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(2016,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

After years of talk but little action from its predecessors, it appears that the new Canadian Government is recognizing that if we want to preserve the sovereignty of our vast Arctic territory we need to do more than have politicians use the phrase ‘from sea to sea to sea’ when describing Canada.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

In a ministerial mandate letter dated 13 November 2015, Canada’s Prime Minister, the Right Honourable Justin Trudeau, made it clear to the Honourable Hunter Tootoo, his Minister of Fisheries and the Coast Guard, that developing Canada’s Coast Guard fleet is a priority.

(2015,
By Environment Canada

(Ongoing Updates) Environment Canada has prepared numerous reports on the Arctic Ecosystem in relation to Climate Change and Conservation Strategies.

(2015,

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2015,

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS and MARK DUNCAN and MICHAEL DOREY
The Urgent Need for Search and Rescue

THE CHALLENGE
Canada has both marine and aviation search and rescue (SAR) requirements and obligations that have been agreed to by longstanding binding international agreements. That is not in dispute. The question is, in view of increasing commercial and cruise ship activity, are current SAR capabilities adequate?

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Across the vast expanse of the Arctic coast, on Great Slave Lake and in the Mackenzie Delta, boaters in distress look to members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) for assistance. In the Northwest Territories, the all-volunteer CCGA has units in Aklavik, Inuvik, Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Resolution, Fort Chipewyan and Fort McMurray. In Nunavut, the eastern Arctic, CCGA units are in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet and Pangnirtung.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Across the vast expanse of the Arctic coast, on Great Slave Lake and in the Mackenzie Delta, boaters in distress look to members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) for assistance. In the Northwest Territories, the all-volunteer CCGA has units in Aklavik, Inuvik, Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Resolution, Fort Chipewyan and Fort McMurray. In the eastern Arctic, Nunavut, there are units in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet and Pangnirtung.

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Tsunamis, earthquakes and nuclear crises in Japan, droughts in China, the “Arab Spring” upheavals, Osama dead, Ratko captured, tornadoes in southern U.S., floods in Australia and, at home, fires in Alberta, floods in Manitoba and Quebec ... These and other situations force us to focus on the question: “What is the state of our emergency preparedness and security?”

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

“There is a new world emerging above the Arctic Circle. It is this world, a new world for all the peoples of the Arctic regions that we in Canada are working to build”
– Stephen Harper, August 2008, Inuvik, NWT

Lt-General Michael Jeffery
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Canada Must Face the Potential for Domestic and Global Threats!

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

Effective Understanding for Decision-Making
We can see from the definitions offered in Part 1 of this article (see Winter 2009/2010 edition) that an “effective understanding” of the Maritime Domain must come from a knowledge of the facts -- whether they originate from geo-spatial surveillance and reconnaissance data or intelligence analysis and assessment.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY DAVID GEWIRTZ

Highway 99, the Sea-to-Sky Highway, runs from ­Vancouver to Squamish along the Howe Sound on the way to Whistler, and is one of my favorite drives in all of North America. For 17 days this coming February, the Sea-to-Sky Highway is going to be swamped with millions of travelers traversing the 120 miles from Olympic venues in Vancouver to the slopes in Whistler.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY ALAN BURKE


A severe tornado ripped through the city centre of Atlanta, Georgia in March 2008.

(2009,

(January 2009) This report provides a qualitative analysis of risk factors for five potential marine incidents likely to happen as shipping, tourism, exploration and development of natural resources (e.g., oil, gas, minerals) occur with the retreating Arctic ice cover.

(2009,
By the Senate Standing Committee

(May 2009) Senate Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans calls for a stronger Coast Guard to assert Canada?s presence in the North.

(2009,
By the Government of Canada

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2009,
By the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans

(June 2009) Fourth Report from the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans calls for more attention to the future role and capability of the Coast Guard.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In our winter issue, we have chosen to examine security for the upcoming 2010 Winter Olympics and have a first glance at how preparations are ­progressing since the official unveiling in September 2006 in Whistler.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT HUEBERT

The Arctic is changing. Combined factors of climate change, resource development and changing geo-political concerns create an Arctic that is becoming more accessible – and thus coveted – by the outside world. The increased tempo of southern penetration of the north will provide opportunities for Canadians, but, at the same time, create difficult challenges to solve. The uncertainty of how this will manifest itself is perhaps the greatest difficulty now facing Government officials.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Few post 9/11 security challenges are as daunting as the one facing Canada when it considers what is generically described as maritime security. The sheer size of the Canadian maritime environment is mind numbing. The coastline alone, including Newfoundland and PEI, is almost 72,000 kilometers long with frontage on the Arctic, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Add in the hundreds of islands and that coastline more than triples.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY R.J. QUINN

With the longest coastline in the world (243,772 km), and a marine area of responsibility of over 11 million square kilo­meters, Canada faces a formidable surveillance challenge! Along these shores are 250 ports and, on a typical day, 1700 ships are in our area of responsibility. It is important to know exactly what is happening in the ocean approaches to our borders. The goal in marine security, therefore, is to obtain “domain awareness” so that we can deal with potential threats before they get too close.