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(2016,
issue 4)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr

Could powerful molecular methodologies be used to engineer new bioweapons, or will it bring new hope for cures to devastating diseases?

(2016,

 
Canada and the United States came together from April 26 to 28, 2016 to assess technologies that can help their respective emergency management officials and responders communicate and exchange information more efficiently during an emergency situation touching both sides of the border. The experiment provided key insights to inform future investments in cross-border communications technologies and the results will be documented in a joint Canada-U.S. after action report.
 

Editor's Corner
(2015,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

My first 9 months as executive editor of Frontline Safety and Security has been a great learning process that included meeting with and learning from the people and organizations responsible for keeping Canadians Safe and Secure. The purpose of these meetings was to learn more about their issues, about what they wanted – and needed – to read about in the pages of FrontLine.

Editor's Corner
(2015,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF
A Request to FrontLine Readers

It has been an interesting first few months for me as the new editor of Frontline Safety and Security. I have spent the last few months meeting with organizations tasked with, or interested in, keeping the public safe – let’s call them partners in safety and security. These have included various intelligence organizations, associations, first responders, and Universities.

(2015,

(April 2009) In an annual report on terrorism, the State Department says "Al-Qaeda remained the greatest terrorist threat to the United States and its partners" even though its structures have weakened and public support has waned. And it warns that Al-Qaeda "has reconstituted some of its pre-9/11 operational capabilities" by using the Pakistan border areas, replacing key leaders, and restoring some "central control" by its top leadership.

(2015,

(June 2009) This document updates the Secure Border Action Plan from 2006 and reviews other important areas of interest that have emerged and which require investigation and action.

(2015,

(Jan 2010) There are a number of reasons why France has not suffered a terrorist attack in more than a decade. One reason is due to the successes of the country's experienced and well-established counterterrorism apparatus.

(2015,

(Feb 2009) This paper addresses sources of societal tensions and violent conflict involving minority groups of Muslim culture in contemporary Europe. Six country studies are presented: Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Russia and the United Kingdom.

(2015,

(April 2009) This paper by Luis de la Corte and Andrea Gim?nez-Salinas offers a short review of the recent scientific literature about three main issues related to suicide violence.

Editor's Corner
(2014,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

General Clive Addy steered this magazine throughout its first nine formative years; following in his footsteps will be a distinct honour. Throughout the many years of service to his country, he has given much. Upon retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces, he found a unique way to continue to serve his country – he used this magazine as a vehicle to promote awareness of the need to enhance national security. It is with pleasure that I have accepted the position of incoming Executive Editor of FrontLine Security magazine.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH
An Intercontinental Gateway

Much of the “stuff” Canadians have acquired over the past three decades arrived here from Asia in a shipping container. What is important to both the seller and the purchaser is delivery time, which means the logistics governing the movement of containers around the globe serve one key purpose – time to market.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

THE DISASTER
On the 6th of July of this year, Canadians awoke to images of a tremendously dangerous derailment of a Montreal Maine & Atlantic (MMA) freight train and the explosion of its volatile cargo in the Québec town of Lac Mégantic, on its way to Saint John, New Brunswick from Montreal. By mid-July, Transportation Safety Board (TSB) investigators reported that:

Interview: Dr Michael Kempa
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Dr Michael Kempa is an Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa, and a freelance journalist who enjoys diving into the messy reality of the politics and economics of policing and security. Editor Clive Addy talks to him about the current situation of rising costs without the benefit of rising budgets.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

Newspapers were full with stories of how the RCMP, supported by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), had just prevented a “terrorist attack” at the BC Legislature on July 1st (Canada Day) 2013. These unfolding events provided a revealing background to my inquiries about Canada’s maritime security infrastructure, and were relevant to my inquiries on how culturally different federal departments work together efficiently.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

The warning was unequivocal: Canadians must confront the steadily increasing numbers of technological traps, trip-wires and hazards that await the unprepared, the careless and the unaware.

In October, Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) president Tim Page opened SecureTech 2013, by describing Canada’s security environment. “Serious risks to pubic safety, threats to our eco systems, traditional way of life and national security challenges abound, and are growing in complexity, impact and cost.”

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our Roots
We have dedicated this issue to Border Security. It is both timely and important that we do so, for we North American neighbours find ourselves at a critical juncture in this more globally accessible and competitive world where we benefit from reasonably stable governments, are blessed by vast territory, rich resources, significantly intertwined economies and secular institutions open to all members of our society.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY COLIN ROBERTSON

Margaret Atwood once remarked that if the national mental illness of the United States is megalomania, that of Canada is paranoid schizophrenia.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As this issue of Frontline Security demonstrates, a critical part of border security is the detection and interdiction of guns and drugs, and now people, that criminals, and possibly worse, are trying to smuggle into Canada. Getting it right in border security is essential because what gets through at the border inevitably ends up on the streets of our communities, and this means more criminal activity and less public safety.

RCMP C/Supt Joe Oliver
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1986, Chief Superintendent Oliver became Director General Border Integrity in April 2009. He was responsible for overseeing the delivery of five law enforcement programs that contribute to the national security of Canada, and the protection of Canadians from terrorism, orga­nized crime, and other ­border-related criminality.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As we embark on 2013, it is timely to reflect on the state of the various components of the security sector in Canada including to note progress made and action required. To do that, it’s helpful to reflect on that which happened in 2012…and that which didn’t because for both reasons it was a year of great significance for safety and security issues in Canada. This factual analysis will also demonstrate what needs action now.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY JIM PHILLIPS

The Canadian/U.S. relationship in the 21st century demands the facilitation and growth of trade, tourism, and job creation for continued economic strength while protecting the citizens of both countries. Canada and the U.S. must act to make both of our countries safe, secure, and economically viable in a global economy. A trade ­efficient Canada/U.S. border, under whatever levels of necessary security, must become a reality.

Editor's Corner
(2012,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

We are on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the creation of a single Canadian federal department focused on “Public Safety.” After 9-11, an obvious need to form a more robust coordination of our National Security. Thus, from the Solicitor General Branch and the Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Emergency Preparedness (OCIPEP) in the 90’s, the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada was created in 2003, headed by Minister Anne McLellan.

One Last Thing
(2011,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

That same hard truth also exists for much of the world of law enforcement including border security which has been in the news recently in Canada although this time, German arsonists notwithstanding, for some very encouraging reasons, collectively known as the Canada-US ‘Beyond the Border’ Agreement.  

(2011,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Similar to most threats to our public safety and national security, port security involves fundamental principles for staying safe from either natural disruptions or actions by criminals and terrorists. Response, Recovery and Resilience are well known common principles upon which to structure the security of ports, build programs and develop systems to suit the ­specific environment.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

“There is a new world emerging above the Arctic Circle. It is this world, a new world for all the peoples of the Arctic regions that we in Canada are working to build”
– Stephen Harper, August 2008, Inuvik, NWT

Vic Toews
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

This year has been very productive at the Department of Public Safety, from both the legislative and policy implementation points of view. As well, there has been a greater degree of coordination and integration with our U.S. neighbour in many security domains.


Minister Vic Toews delivers a speech at the CentrePort Construction milestones event in Winnipeg, June 18, 2010.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Since that time, then Senator has indeed become President Obama and has launched (in March) the National Cybersecurity Initiative with a $40 billion budget.

William J. Lynn III
Deputy Director of Defense

"The reality is that we cannot defend our networks by ourselves. We need a shared defense.

Intergraph Corporation
(2010,
issue 2)
BY SHANE LOATES


ETS dispatcher uses Integrah CAD to respond to security incidents.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON

For six generations, approximately 95 percent of the Canada-US border was undefended; official crossing points were the chief exception. The boundary between our nation and the United States spans 6,416 kilometres – 2,878 km on land and 3,538 km on water – and includes terrain that is flat, hilly, and mountainous, vast tracks of prairie and forests, and lakes, rivers, creeks, and marshes. For decades, governments on both sides have tried to curtail smuggling and human trafficking.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY FRAN HAWTHORNE

The array of neon colors, glittering on a flimsy strip of foil, is almost blinding. The colours illuminate a vertical row of five 5s, each in a unique set of pastels – green on purple, green on orange, coral on purple, and so on. Tilt the foil 45 degrees, however, and three of the 5s become the symbol for the euro, in different colours than before. Tilt again, and the strip is solid silver, with no colours or neon, with the 5s and euro symbols barely visible.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY RON MORAN

On June 22nd, the Customs and Immigration Union (formerly known as CEUDA) testified before the Senate Committee on National Security and Defense (SCONSAD) in Ottawa. As anyone familiar with border security will appreciate, these are two of the most active and influential groups in this important security area.


A CBSA officer and a traveller at an airport primary inspection line.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Since before Confederation, the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River and other waterways through which the Canada-U.S. border runs have been maritime freeways used by smugglers. Booze, weapons, cigarettes, drugs and other cargoes such as illegal aliens have been transported between Canada and the United States for decades.  


RCMP Photo

(2009,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS

A Strategic Imperative

(2009,
issue 1)
2007/2008 What a Difference a Year and a UDI Makes

Mitrovica is Europe’s most divided city – Belgrade’s last bastion of influence in Kosovo – a thorn in the side of both the newly sovereign Kosovo Assembly in Pristina and the international community overseeing Kosovo’s new status. It is the flashpoint of most post-independence violence and demonstrations, and the seat of power for the illegal ­“parallel-institutions” that divide Kosovo’s internal governance with that of Belgrade’s.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS A. TASS

From 1990, travel restrictions out of the post communist states almost evaporated. Simultaneously entry restrictions were significantly eased in the U.S., Canada and most western European countries.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our common border with the United States stretches across 8,893 kilometers (5,526 miles) of land and three oceans. According to Gov­ernment of Canada statistics, the annual two-way trade in goods and services between Canada and the U.S. in 2007 was worth over C$576 billion. Clearly, border security is a vital component of our ­economic security.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY JILL OLEN

Natural and man-made disasters don’t recognize political boundaries; the path of a radiological plume will not respect a port of entry. Border communities share many of the same concerns, but there are also some unique conditions that require innovative initiatives from multiple partners. Increased security requirements have heightened ­tensions at the borders that prior to 9/11/01 were easily resolved with local cooperation.

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Usually critical of government (in)action on criminal justice and security issues, I was ­uncharacteristically upbeat when asked by FrontLine Security to comment on the state of ­current progress on border security in Canada. Such unusual confidence comes from the simple but unmistakable fact that – despite all the foot dragging, doubletalk, cost over­estimates, institutional rivalries and the ‘we’ve always done it that way’ attitudes – progress has been made, and more is clearly on the way.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY RON MORAN

Many Canadians would be surprised to learn that in today’s heightened security world, Canada has not deployed some kind of mobile patrol capable of interdicting cross border illegal activity. A quick look at a map demonstrates both the challenge and the obvious need for such a capacity. This reality was brought home recently when, during a presentation on the U.S. Secure Border Initiative (SBI), a senior American representative from the SBI prime contractor (Boeing) remarked that, unlike Mexico, SBI Net North would be focused on ­surveillance, ­intelligence and mobile interdiction.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

It was billed as a Transportation Security and Technology Forum with the goal of applying Canadian and global solutions. And it didn’t disappoint. Kicked off by a refreshingly candid analysis of maritime security ­vulnerabilities by Defense Minister Peter MacKay, the Conference Board of Canada’s November 2007 Transportation Security Conference ­featured an impressive array of speakers with detailed ­presentations and a series of ­specific recommendations for improvements.

(2008,

(January 2008) This phrase summarizes the goal of the U.S. federal government charged with interviewing, assessing, processing, analyzing, and welcoming hundreds of millions of international visitors while finding the small numbers of people (the needles in the haystack) intent on using our openness against us. This Committee was tasked with advising the Departments of Homeland Security and State in their mission to protect not only America's security but also U.S. economic livelihood, ideals, image, and strategic relationships with the world.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE

Watching from the fenceline as Emirates Flight EK207 touches down on Toronto’s runway 24L at the end of its ­nonstop, 15-hour run from Dubai, aircraft enthusiast Andy Cline is thoroughly enjoying his hobby. As he closely observes the taxiing Boeing 777-300ER he (and about 150 other Airport Watch volunteers that regularly “spot” ­aircraft at Toronto-Pearson airport) is contributing to the safety and security of a major Canadian airport.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Few post 9/11 security challenges are as daunting as the one facing Canada when it considers what is generically described as maritime security. The sheer size of the Canadian maritime environment is mind numbing. The coastline alone, including Newfoundland and PEI, is almost 72,000 kilometers long with frontage on the Arctic, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Add in the hundreds of islands and that coastline more than triples.

Senator Colin Kenny
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

One of the most knowledgeable and comprehensive examinations of the state of our Maritime Security has been one conducted by the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence. For the last six years, during its study, it has heard testimony, examined data, held regional hearings and visited our ports. The Committee has twice published its recommendations in ominously titled reports: Canada’s Coastlines The longest undefended borders in the World (2003), and a rather damning update of this initial report, entitled simply Coasts (2007).

(2007,
issue 3)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU
Canada-U.S. border partnerships in the St. Lawrence Seaway

On 3 September 2007, at about 6:40 p.m., officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the U.S. Coast Guard spotted an 18-foot boat ­transporting large green plastic bags on the St. Lawrence River. As the authorities approached, the driver abandoned the boat in the water, just off the eastern tip of Cornwall Island, Ontario, and fled on foot.

One Last Thing
(2007,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As this issue of FrontLine Security illustrates, the marine component of domestic security measures has never been as important for Canada as it is today. The reasons for this is, of course, are fairly obvious.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD COHEN

‘Big Ideas’ have long been a feature of Canada-U.S. relations. One recent very Big Idea is the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), launched in 2004 by the Prime Minister of Canada, President Bush, and the Mexican president. Several other Big Ideas co-exist with the SPP and some of them nestle under its wing. But there are many less-grand ideas, most initiated well below national level both by government and the private sector. Several of these smaller ideas may well have just as big an impact in the longer term on our lives and prosperity.

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our winter Borders and Biometrics edition was very timely.

(2007,
U.S. and Canadian Government Report

(2007) This report, published jointly by the U.S. and Canadian governments, examines the current state of illicit drug smuggling across the United States-Canadian border. The report identifies the principal substances which are smuggled in both directions across the border. The authors place special emphasis on the cooperative efforts which law enforcement agencies on both sides of the border engage in and how this has influenced the movement of these illegal substances. (Note: be patient, this link takes a LONG time to load)

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

The theme of this issue is very pertinent as it follows on the heels of recent ­pronouncements by Prime Minister Harper in Vancouver this summer and by U.S. President Bush in September. As part of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, there is need for a great and mutual effort on all sides to ensure the free and expeditious flow of legitimate persons and goods between our two countries. This implies a mutual trust in agreed identification systems for these persons and goods.

Ron Moran
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In 2004, the Martin government formed the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) by moving parts of the former Customs and Revenue Agency and parts of Immigration into this entity as a Separate Operating Agency under Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. In August 2006 in Vancouver, Prime Minister Harper reiterated his government’s commitment to reinforce the security along our border with the United States, and in recent months both U.S.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY CARA PREST and DEREK MELLON
Today and Tomorrow

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) processes about 97 million people and a constant flow of goods worth billions of dollars each year — the value of cross-border trade with the United States alone averages $1.9 billion a day. It is a massive responsibility. The task is made all the more challenging by the current post-9/11 environment, fraught as it is with the threat of terrorism and other criminal activities.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY TANYA MILLER

The length and geography of Canada’s shared border with the United States presents security challenges. To meet those challenges, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s Border Integrity Program tackles cross-border crime by taking an international and ­integrated approach in their investigations.

One Last Thing
(2006,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

He has seven separate aliases (that we know of), and is believed to possess American, Guyanese, Trinidadian and Canadian passports as well as pilot training. He is an engineering graduate that the FBI reports attended Ontario’s McMaster University (where he sought to acquire nuclear material) as well as Al Qaeda training camps before 9/11. He speaks English flawlessly having been raised in New York and Florida where his associates included Jose Padilla and Mohammed Atta.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

I am very pleased to launch FRONTLINE SECURITY in the wake of the change in our national Government. One of the elements that we believe was called for in this change is a clearer and more knowledgeable debate of broader national security issues and their impact on our well-being and democratic society. Our magazine has been designed to offer such a national voice to this debate in a more security-conscious Canadian society. Just as Julian Fantino says of Emergency Preparedness in his interview in this issue, our own magazine is also “a work in progress.”