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(2016,
issue 4)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr [field_writer2]

Could powerful molecular methodologies be used to engineer new bioweapons, or will it bring new hope for cures to devastating diseases?

(2015,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

In the immediate aftermath of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, one of the most important realizations by Government was that a society’s crime vulnerabilities were likely national security vulnerabilities with potentially enormously dangerous consequences. 

One Last Thing
(2012,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

It's More Than Gadgets and Gizmos
In the ‘non lab coat’ world of law enforcement, security and first responders, “technology” is a means to an end and not an end unto itself. That ‘end’, of course, is the successful performance of operational duties, which have enormous public safety ramifications as well as real risk to the men and women who perform them on our behalf.

(2010,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] A SOLUTIONS SHOWCASE

In today’s electronic world, criminals routinely use sophisticated means to steal personal identity data from both public and private organizations. As the stability of identification credentials is breached, one response is to turn to the collection of biometrics. Biometric identity solutions are emerging on a global scale as nations and industry recognize the integral role it will play in non-transferable, unique identification.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As promised, this Summer 2010 edition deals with criminal financing and its effects on our security. To open, we called upon the expert perspectives of two former RCMP authorities well-versed in the subject of what we call ‘Dirty Money,’ for our first look on this specific topic.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]
How Secure Are They?

At 6:41 p.m. local time on 19 January 2010, a woman arrived at the luxury Al Bustan Rotana hotel in Dubai, accompanied by a large man in a Panama hat. Unbeknownst to hotel staff or authorities in the popular emirate, the couple were part of a clandestine group sent to Dubai to track and kill Mahmoud al-Mabhouh, a senior Hamas commander.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] A PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE U.S.

The Homeland Security Institute (HSI) was conceived in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 9/11. In its report Making the Nation Safer, the National Academies proposed the creation of a dedicated, not-for-profit technical ­analysis and support institute for homeland security to provide the U.S. Federal Government with much needed analytic capabilities in support of effective counterterrorism-related decision making and program execution.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(May 2009) The report covers in detail existing and evolving markets and products in the following segments: Weapons detection; Explosives detection; Multi-Threat detection including portals and standoff solutions); Biometrics; Profiling; and Behavior Tracking.

Ward Elcock
(2008,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Mr. Elcock is a respected veteran of security matters in the higher levels of the federal Public Service, having headed CSIS and been more recently the Deputy Minister of National Defence. FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, welcomes his perspective as a follow-up to our recent edition on the security of the 2010 Olympics.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD COHEN [field_writer2]

‘Big Ideas’ have long been a feature of Canada-U.S. relations. One recent very Big Idea is the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), launched in 2004 by the Prime Minister of Canada, President Bush, and the Mexican president. Several other Big Ideas co-exist with the SPP and some of them nestle under its wing. But there are many less-grand ideas, most initiated well below national level both by government and the private sector. Several of these smaller ideas may well have just as big an impact in the longer term on our lives and prosperity.

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our winter Borders and Biometrics edition was very timely.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY GARRY FRAPPIER and DAVID SACHS

With the recent convergence of debate on the potential for growth in Canada’s nuclear industry, and renewed terrorist threats directed at this country, it is timely to review the security situation of Canada’s nuclear facilities and materials. After 9/11, Canada’s nuclear regulator – the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) – determined that the entire industry (including its own organization) faced a need for significant enhancements in their approach to security.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

The theme of this issue is very pertinent as it follows on the heels of recent ­pronouncements by Prime Minister Harper in Vancouver this summer and by U.S. President Bush in September. As part of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, there is need for a great and mutual effort on all sides to ensure the free and expeditious flow of legitimate persons and goods between our two countries. This implies a mutual trust in agreed identification systems for these persons and goods.

(2006,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY CARA PREST and DEREK MELLON
Today and Tomorrow

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) processes about 97 million people and a constant flow of goods worth billions of dollars each year — the value of cross-border trade with the United States alone averages $1.9 billion a day. It is a massive responsibility. The task is made all the more challenging by the current post-9/11 environment, fraught as it is with the threat of terrorism and other criminal activities.

One Last Thing
(2006,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

He has seven separate aliases (that we know of), and is believed to possess American, Guyanese, Trinidadian and Canadian passports as well as pilot training. He is an engineering graduate that the FBI reports attended Ontario’s McMaster University (where he sought to acquire nuclear material) as well as Al Qaeda training camps before 9/11. He speaks English flawlessly having been raised in New York and Florida where his associates included Jose Padilla and Mohammed Atta.

(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY KEN DUNLAP

Protecting our passengers and employees with effective and efficient security measures is the highest priority for the aviation industry. However, since the tragic events of September 11, 2001, the airline industry has endured a continuous stream of stopgap security measures – many of these were rushed into effect with little or no industry input. What we are finding, is that a security system designed through hastened reaction to a crisis may not be the best long-term solution for the industry.

(2006,
[field_writer2]

(December 2006) This report uses the National Identity Scheme to strengthen borders of the United Kingdom and enforce compliance within the UK.