Search

(2016,

After protesters shut down five oil pipelines carrying Canadian crude oil, police and energy companies say preventing a disruption is 'near impossible'.  After the attacks, police, pipeline companies and government officials on both sides of the Canada-US border addressed the threat.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY ETTORE CONTESTABILE

Efforts in infrastructure protection in Canada existed to different degrees before the Sept 11 tragedies, but this event brought to the forefront the need to better define critical infrastructure.

(2015,

(2009) Marsh's Chemical Practice has produced a 2009 benchmark study that compares the risk management and insurance programs of more than 220 chemical industry buyers in the United States.Marsh's Chemical Practice has produced a 2009 benchmark study that compares the risk management and insurance programs of more than 220 chemical industry buyers in the United States.

(2014,

(Feb 2009) This report describes existing and upcoming technologies, markets, business and funding opportunities related to producing, using, and/or stockpiling Chemical, Biological, Nuclear and Radiological (CBRN) decontamination equipment and materials for the purpose of decontaminating people, as well as indoor and outdoor environments. The need to decontaminate people, buildings and infrastructures after CBRN incidences will lead to an $8.3 billion market by 2020 for CBRN Decontamination equipment sales & maintenance.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY PIERRE PORIER

First Responders strive to keep the public safe during emergencies. Such careers often put their own safety at risk, and yet we regularly hear ­stories of courage in the face of those ­perils.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Where does Canada stand on the topic of CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) threats – this less likely, most dangerous, and much discussed realm of security and safety threats to humanity? There are a myriad of international treaties and conventions on these matters.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

View PDF

Situational awareness is crucial in a CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear and/or Explosive) incident. 


Instrument View displays live images and data, and replays data stored from a database.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY FRAN HAWTHORNE

The spraying of the deadly Ebola virus into a crowded subway, for example, could kill or injure hundreds of civilians. Or, as in the movies “Contagion” and “Outbreak,” entire towns might be quarantined and millions infected by a virulent, mutated bat virus or an Ebola-like virus, respectively.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY
When Common Sense and Courage Are No Longer Enough

First responders are on the front lines of counter-terrorism. When terrorists attack, emergency services personnel have no choice but to react. That makes police, fire and medical personnel vulnerable to attackers that can strike anonymously, from a distance, with invisible weapons.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY MARIO D'ANGELO

Post September 11, 2001, an increased sense of urgency has been paid to the threat of terrorism; more specifically, to the possibility that terrorists might resort to the use of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear resources in a deliberate act of aggression. This notion was certainly reinforced when, in 2001, a domestic terrorist(s) mailed letters containing anthrax through the United States Postal System.

Lt-General Michael Jeffery
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Canada Must Face the Potential for Domestic and Global Threats!

(2010,
issue 1)
BY WILLIAM F. MacKAY

A disciplined approach to emergency response (DA) is a data gathering and decision making process to aid responders in handling hazardous materials emergencies in a logical and methodical manner. For over 30 years this method, which is summarized on a Disciplined Approach to Emergency Response chart, has been used by industry response teams and public sector first responders to effectively respond to incidents involving dangerous goods.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY WILLIAM F. MacKAY

Determined to avoid such a disaster in Canada, and concluding that there was a need for governments and industry to work “interdependently” to prevent an industrial accident of the Bhopal sort federal and provincial government departments and industry formed the Major Industrial Accidents Council of Canada (MIACC). One of MIACC’s major programs was Partnerships Toward Safer Communities (PTSC).

(2010,
issue 1)
BY CRAIG S. GALBRAITH and CHRISTY DIFELICE

The range of highly advanced technology available to first responders is truly astounding. From cognitive radios to real-time field draw screens, record fire perimeters and 3-D personal tracking devices, first responder agencies are inundated with technological choices. Many of these technologies are being developed as spin-outs from defense contracts and grants. Others are entrepreneurial inventions targeted directly toward the primary response market. But what really are the needs of first responders?

(2009,
issue 3)
BY DR JAMES YOUNG

The H1N1 virus is here in Canada and it is a pandemic. Given these facts, it offers us the opportunity to see if we have learned some key lessons from our experience with severe acute ­respiratory syndrome (SARS).

A pandemic, by definition, is the global spread of a new virus by human-to-human contact and for which humans have no resistance.

Dr David Butler-Jones
(2009,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In our Spring 2006 issue, Dr. David Butler-Jones, then recently appointed Public Health Officer of Canada, expressed to FrontLine Security, the goals and aspirations of his newly minted agency.  Since then, many public health issues have come to the fore, such as the ongoing H1N1 swine flu and the recent Listeriosis outbreak, to name but two.

(2009,

(June 2009) Conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this report summarizes the relative importance of identified releases in terms of potential health risks at Los Alamos. The Los Alamos facility had a single mission – perfection of the design and manufacture of the first atomic bombs.

(2009,

(February 2009) Although the consequences of a radiologic dispersal device are substantial, and the detonation of a modest-sized (10 kiloton) improvised nuclear device is catastrophic, it is both possible and imperative that a medical response be planned.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY STEVEN DE LISI

Most firefighters today receive training that meets the objectives of the First Responder Operational level. Among the many tasks assigned to personnel at this training level are establishing scene control, initiating an incident management system, and performing defensive control functions and emergency decontamination procedures. Training involves classroom and hands-on skills to ensure students are fully capable of performing these and many more vital tasks necessary to ensure that the initial stages of a hazardous materials (hazmat) incident are handled safely and effectively.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY RON MEYERS

The Canadian Standards Association (CSA), and the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) as the lead Federal organization, in cooperation with other stakeholders, have begun to collaboratively develop the first Canadian national standard for personal protective equipment for first responders (fire, police, paramedic, and hospital first receivers) in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) incident.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY MARK EGENER

THE ALBERTA EXPERIENCE FOLLOWING THE AUGUST 2005 DERAILMENT AT LAKE WABAMUN
Regions and municipalities deal with crises on a somewhat regular basis and therfore tend to maintain their readiness levels, however, major disasters that call for special resources do not happen very often. The tendency then, especially as events fade into the past, is to let our preparedness guards down. This is perhaps more true at the federal and provincial/state ­levels that are further removed from first response demands.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Idassa 2007 Croatia

IDASSA 2007 is the second Natural Disaster exercise that the Republic of Croatia, in cooperation with NATO’s Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coord­ina­tion Centre (EADRCC), has organized on its territory. The majority of Croatian work for the exercise was organized and conducted by the National Protection and Reserve Directorate.


Croatioan Civil Protection Team on IDASSA exercise. (Photo: Dino Stanin)

(2007,
issue 2)
BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Would Canada be able to effectively respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction attack? A cooperative initiative aimed at providing critical equipment and training to First Responders, is needed to enable them to safely intervene in Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) incidents. The solution – let’s call it a First Responder Rebate Program (FRRP) – would provide the equipment and training necessary for effective and efficient First Responder (FR) rescue operations.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY DOUG SILVER and CAROL-LYNN CHAMBERS

Heavy Urban Search and Rescue (HUSAR) teams are multi-disciplinary in nature. Personnel and equipment used by these teams can be deployed locally, provincially, and across Canada to provide the specialized search and rescue to free and recover trapped victims.


Toronto HUSAR team members work to remove heavy debris and secure safe positions within a collapsed structure.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

The protection of critical infrastructure is a key national security issue in a way that it has not been since the ‘snakes and ladders’ days of the late 1950s and the early Cold War civil defence program. Today’s threat has changed from Soviet rockets to various state and non-state actors armed with an equally wide variety of weapons. With this revolution in military affairs, has come a renewed interest in asymmetric confrontation of the Superpower and its NATO and Western Allies.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY MARK EDMONDS

Hospitals have a long history of ­participation in emergency preparedness. Historically, it would have two types of emergency plans; one to respond to a mass casualty situation, and a second to evacuate the building in the case of a catastrophic event. Emergency planning for hospitals has evolved in the post 9-11 world, with CBRN (chemical, biological, radiation and nuclear) incident training and preparation becoming more wide spread.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

When the FedEx driver reported what he was carrying when he became involved in a car accident, people paid attention. His March 2, 2005 shipment included samples of anthrax, tuberculosis, E. coli, influenza and salmonella – all deadly viruses.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY SHELDON DICKIE, CAM BOULE and SUSAN McINTYRE

In the fall of 2001, Canada’s federal government took steps to enhance preparedness through new programs and funding aimed specifically at countering terrorism.  In its budget of December 12, 2001, the government committed $7.7 billion to bolster defences against terrorism which could have devastating affects on national security, the economy and collective psyche.  Of this funding, $170 million was given to the federal S&T community to address Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) hazards or weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

(2006,
issue 1)
BY RODGER B. SLOAN

While the risk of a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) attack is small, the consequences of such an attack are enormous: the public’s perception of personal security, and the enormous costs associated with detection, identification, treatment of affected persons and cleanup ensures that this risk must be mitigated by preparation. Timely and reliable identification of suspect areas and materials is also essential to minimize risks of exposure, costs of cleanup and threat to public security.

(2006,

(November 2006) This primer is intended to serve as a quick reference in the event of a radiation disaster. It summarizes information on preparing for a radiation emergency, handling contaminated persons, dose assessment and radiation exposure health effects. It also includes information on radiological findings related to agents of biological and chemical terrorism because radiologists may be involved in the diagnosis of conditions associated with such exposures.

(2005,
By the Library of Congress

(2005) Marine shipments of hazardous chemical cargo may be attractive terrorist targets because of their large volume and inherent toxicity or flammability. The Maritime Transportation Security Act and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code give the U.S. Coast Guard far-ranging authority over the security of hazardous marine shipping. The agency has developed port security plans addressing how to deploy federal, state, and local resources to prevent terrorist attacks.

(2001,

(March 2001) The MHMI series is a three volume set of pdfs (with a video) comprised of recommendations for on-scene (prehospital), and hospital medical management of patients exposed during a hazardous materials incident. Vol I: Emergency Medical Services; Vol II: Hospital Emergency Departments; Vol III: Medical Management Guidelines.The MHMI series is a three volume set of pdfs (with a video) comprised of recommendations for on-scene (prehospital), and hospital medical management of patients exposed during a hazardous materials incident.