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(2017,
issue 1)
BY MARTHA J. LAGUARDIA-KOTITE
Newest flagships enhance National Security

It is July 2013 and U.S. Coast Guard deck hands take in the mooring lines aboard Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a Legend-class National Security Cutter. Stratton slowly drifts away from the San Diego pier, sounding three short blasts to alert nearby maritime traffic that the 418-foot steel vessel was backing out. The engines shift, increasing speed ahead, and USCGC Stratton is outbound for sea.

(2017,
issue 1)
Maritime Extended Border Security

The USCG is currently part of the Department of Homeland Security and is also part of the Department of Defense, through Title X of the National Defense Act. It is a hybrid agency that works maritime security in the broad sense of the word – from the low end to the higher end of the threat environment.

(2017,

 

GE’s Marine Solutions announced that the United States Coast Guard commissioned Munro, a new National Security Cutter (NSC), on April 1 in Seattle, Washington. All of these new Legend class cutters use the same reliable COmbined Diesel And Gas turbine (CODAG) propulsion system featuring one GE LM2500 gas turbine and two diesel engines.

(2016,
issue 3)

The Canadian Coast Guard, which became a Special Operating Agency in 2005, accomplishes its work with resources at its disposal, but there are undeniable ­deficiencies, some of which undoubtedly prompted Prime Minister Trudeau to prioritize the needs of the Coast Guard in his mandate letter to the Minister.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

After years of talk but little action from its predecessors, it appears that the new Canadian Government is recognizing that if we want to preserve the sovereignty of our vast Arctic territory we need to do more than have politicians use the phrase ‘from sea to sea to sea’ when describing Canada.

(2016,

The Canadian Coast Guard would like to inform the public that its seasonal search and rescue bases in Québec City, Tadoussac, Kegaska, Rivière-au-Renard, Havre-Saint-Pierre and Cap-aux-Meules will open on or around April 1st, 2016.

The Canadian Coast Guard’s seasonal bases are strategically located to provide rapid assistance and reduce the number and severity of maritime incidents and risks to the environment. The bases are open from April to November.

(2016,

 
Brian Carter, President – Seaspan Shipyards, announced today the start of construction on Seaspan’s second National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) ship, the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG)’s second Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel (OFSV).
 

(2016,

 

The Canadian Coast Guard has transferred a fast rescue craft to the Maritimes branch of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary.

The fast rescue craft was previously used by the staff of the CCGS Courtenay Bay at the Coast Guard SAR lifeboat station based in Saint John, New Brunswick.

The Auxiliary will use the vessel for search and rescue training and missions, and to increase their presence at marine-related events in the region.

(2016,

The Kitsilano Coast Guard Base on the BC coast was shut down by the former Harper government more than three years ago. Operational response started up quietly in May, but today was the official re-opening, complete with a First Nations ceremony. The Liberal government pledges to improve the search and rescue capacity and expand the role to include an incident command post for environmental response on the water.

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(2016,

 

Over the next two days, Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships (HMCS) Brandon, Edmonton and Kingston are departing to participate in Operation Caribbe, Canada’s contribution the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking by transnational criminal organizations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

This year has been busy one for Canadian Search and Rescue (SAR) professionals (paid and unpaid), as well as First Nations on Canada’s West Coast and in the Arctic. 

(2014,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES

The mind is the most powerful tool we have at our disposal, and its abilities shouldn’t be taken for granted. Memories stored in our brain constitute a large part of who we are, and our long-term memory allows us to memorize not only facts, but also repetitive physical movements. This is known as muscle memory, or motor learning, a type of procedural memory that is developed by programming a specific motor task or movement into the brain’s memory through repetition.

Surveillance-to-Intelligence
(2014,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Great progress has been made since 2007 when Frontline Security first reported on radar surveillance technology designed for use in the homeland by public safety organizations, whose responsibilities include border security, search and rescue, transportation security, and law enforcement.


Typical radar node.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

Questions are being asked – yet again – about the federal government’s procurement processes after it was confirmed that Bell Helicopter Textron Canada (BHTC) of Mirabel, Quebec, has effectively been sole-sourced to supply one fleet of Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) light-lift helicopters, despite an ongoing lawsuit, and is likely to be awarded the ­contract to renew a second medium-lift CCG helicopter fleet.

RCMP C/Supt Joe Oliver
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1986, Chief Superintendent Oliver became Director General Border Integrity in April 2009. He was responsible for overseeing the delivery of five law enforcement programs that contribute to the national security of Canada, and the protection of Canadians from terrorism, orga­nized crime, and other ­border-related criminality.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

The motto of Toronto’s Harbour Square Park is “The world in one place.” This phrase pertinently describes the diversity of people, activities and festivals celebrating Toronto’s multicultural society in the restaurants, shops, concerts, exhibitions and parks that straddle Toronto City inner harbour. With the proliferation of high rise condominiums, the area is one of Canada’s higher density residential locations. During the summer, the population expands by thousands as tourists flock to participate in the city’s many festivities.

(2012,
issue 3)


(Also see: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/decades-long-mission-to-replace-sea-kings-hits-another-snag/article4384407/)

(2012,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

A Globe and Mail editorial of 5 June 2012 proclaimed that a sea change is needed in Canada’s Armed Forces as priorities change from land fighting in Afghanistan to preparing for this era defined by the Royal Canadian Navy as the "maritime century.”

(2012,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Engineers at Eurocopter set out to prove that it was possible to create a ‘low cost’ helicopter that could attain high speeds. This summer the company brought its new ‘proof of concept’ X3 helicopter to tour the United States. One year previously, the X3 had flown at 232 knots in level flight at 80% of available power – substantially faster than a conventional helicopter’s 150-160 knots. Speaking in Grand Prairie, Texas at the X3’s U.S. debut in June, Dr.

Editor's Corner
(2012,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In this issue we have focused on Emergency Response, primarily medical, and reflect on some serious proposals such as those by Steve Rowland on Emergency Medical Services in Ontario and Edward R Myers on both the OPP Medical Services and the Culture of Safety Richard Bray and Sean Tracy expose some other responder safety challenges and innovations in their articles dealing with CBRN and electric vehicle accident response.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Across the vast expanse of the Arctic coast, on Great Slave Lake and in the Mackenzie Delta, boaters in distress look to members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) for assistance. In the Northwest Territories, the all-volunteer CCGA has units in Aklavik, Inuvik, Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Resolution, Fort Chipewyan and Fort McMurray. In Nunavut, the eastern Arctic, CCGA units are in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet and Pangnirtung.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS
Transport Canada’s National Aerial Surveillance Program

Canada takes a risk-based management approach to ship-source pollution response, and seeks to prevent marine pollution ­incidents. This prevention and response ­capability to deal with marine pollution incidents arising from ships is buttressed by the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). Administered by the Canadian Coast Guard from its inception in 1991 until 2003 when Transport Canada took on the responsibility, the NASP is an integral element of Canada’s ocean management.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Across the vast expanse of the Arctic coast, on Great Slave Lake and in the Mackenzie Delta, boaters in distress look to members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) for assistance. In the Northwest Territories, the all-volunteer CCGA has units in Aklavik, Inuvik, Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Resolution, Fort Chipewyan and Fort McMurray. In the eastern Arctic, Nunavut, there are units in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet and Pangnirtung.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY DAVID MUGRIDGE
Bringing Together Law and Technology

Weaknesses and Threats
Most serious security practitioners recognize the Western world’s vulnerability to ­maritime-based terrorist violence and that its inability to combat serious criminal activity at sea is increasing. Traditionally, global financial crises, like today’s, have resulted in marked deterioration of national and personal security. The need for flexibility in our national responses to maritime security challenges has never been greater, and with that flexibility comes the clear need for technology.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY DAVID GEWIRTZ

Highway 99, the Sea-to-Sky Highway, runs from ­Vancouver to Squamish along the Howe Sound on the way to Whistler, and is one of my favorite drives in all of North America. For 17 days this coming February, the Sea-to-Sky Highway is going to be swamped with millions of travelers traversing the 120 miles from Olympic venues in Vancouver to the slopes in Whistler.

(2009,
By the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans

(June 2009) Fourth Report from the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans calls for more attention to the future role and capability of the Coast Guard.

(2009,
By the Senate Standing Committee

(May 2009) Senate Standing Committee on Fisheries and Oceans calls for a stronger Coast Guard to assert Canada?s presence in the North.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY MIKE TODDINGTON

As identified by the Canada Council, competing ports in the U.S. have a much better foundation under which to work. American ports are publicly owned, and port officials are elected locally, therefore, port developments in the local public interest receive grants derived from local taxation. Alternatively, limited human and financial resources continue to present a significant disadvantage for Canadian ports.

Supt Michel Aubin
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In the Drug Situation Report – 2006, the RCMP presented for the first time the troubling fact that: “Within a two year period, Canada has reversed its Ecstasy supply pattern status from an import and ­consumer nation to a major ­production and export country.” ­Continued smuggling of the MDMA precursor chemical MDP2P from China to Canada in 2006 confirmed heightened domestic Ecstasy manufacture.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

In their November 2007 report entitled, A Resilient Canada: Governance for National Security and Public Safety, by Trevor Munn-Venn and Andrew Archibald, the Conference Board of Canada has produced an insightful analysis of how Canadians formulate and implement governance in their national security and public safety ­organizations. Interestingly, after interviewing public and private sector leaders and experts in this subject area, the Board found that the greatest threat to national security perceived by these experts is “a lack of clarity around governance.”

(2007,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Few post 9/11 security challenges are as daunting as the one facing Canada when it considers what is generically described as maritime security. The sheer size of the Canadian maritime environment is mind numbing. The coastline alone, including Newfoundland and PEI, is almost 72,000 kilometers long with frontage on the Arctic, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Add in the hundreds of islands and that coastline more than triples.

Senator Colin Kenny
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

One of the most knowledgeable and comprehensive examinations of the state of our Maritime Security has been one conducted by the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence. For the last six years, during its study, it has heard testimony, examined data, held regional hearings and visited our ports. The Committee has twice published its recommendations in ominously titled reports: Canada’s Coastlines The longest undefended borders in the World (2003), and a rather damning update of this initial report, entitled simply Coasts (2007).

(2007,
issue 3)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU
Canada-U.S. border partnerships in the St. Lawrence Seaway

On 3 September 2007, at about 6:40 p.m., officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the U.S. Coast Guard spotted an 18-foot boat ­transporting large green plastic bags on the St. Lawrence River. As the authorities approached, the driver abandoned the boat in the water, just off the eastern tip of Cornwall Island, Ontario, and fled on foot.

One Last Thing
(2007,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As this issue of FrontLine Security illustrates, the marine component of domestic security measures has never been as important for Canada as it is today. The reasons for this is, of course, are fairly obvious.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

I am very pleased to launch FRONTLINE SECURITY in the wake of the change in our national Government. One of the elements that we believe was called for in this change is a clearer and more knowledgeable debate of broader national security issues and their impact on our well-being and democratic society. Our magazine has been designed to offer such a national voice to this debate in a more security-conscious Canadian society. Just as Julian Fantino says of Emergency Preparedness in his interview in this issue, our own magazine is also “a work in progress.”

(2005,
By the Library of Congress

(2005) Marine shipments of hazardous chemical cargo may be attractive terrorist targets because of their large volume and inherent toxicity or flammability. The Maritime Transportation Security Act and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code give the U.S. Coast Guard far-ranging authority over the security of hazardous marine shipping. The agency has developed port security plans addressing how to deploy federal, state, and local resources to prevent terrorist attacks.