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(2017,
issue 1)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

Some startling research findings were presented at the recent 2017 British Psychological Society’s Occupational Psychology Conference. For Air Traffic Controllers (ATCs) were singled out as having one of the most stressful and high-risk vocations. Dr. Nicola Davies spoke to Geoff Trickey, Chartered Psychologist and MD of Psychological Consultancy Limited, about his ATC research and how personality Risk Types affect performance.

(2017,
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(2017,
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Today, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement about flooding in Quebec:

“I have spoken with my provincial counterpart, Public Safety Minister Martin Coiteux, regarding the flooding situation. On behalf of the Government, the Minister of National Defence, the Honourable Harjit Sajjan, and I have accepted his formal request for federal assistance to help citizens in need.

(2017,
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Yesterday, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement about flooding in Eastern Ontario:

(2017,
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(2017,
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Mission Critical Push-To-Talk (MCPTT) fosters a faster response and enhanced situational awareness in the event of a disaster
 

(2017,
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(2017,
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(2017,
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OTTAWA, September 1, 2017 – The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement about the flooding situation in the States of Texas and Louisiana:

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the people of Texas, Louisiana and the surrounding areas, who have been displaced or directly affected by the disastrous effects of Hurricane Harvey.

(2016,
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(2016,
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Civilian and military first responders from Simcoe County will converge on Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden on Sunday, May 1, 2016, to participate in a joint mass casualty exercise as part of Exercise STOP, DROP AND ROLL, a simulated response to an air show accident.

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) personnel from various CFB Borden units will join over 30 volunteer medical first responders from St. John Ambulance Barrie Simcoe Muskoka, County of Simcoe Paramedic Services, and Emergency Management Ontario staff to work through a simulated mass casualty scenario.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Community leaders are justifiably worried that the probe will be too limited; they urge authorities to consider all possible federal and state criminal charges against officers who were caught on video killing a man who was already pinned to the ground by multiple police officers in Baton Rouge, and another killed in Minnesota after a traffic stop.

Timeline

(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

In what is being described in local media reports as a terrorist attack, a truck driver sped along Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France, plowing through and over people in the crowd – using his truck as a weapon.

Initial reports estimated more than 30 dead, but that has been recently updated to up tp 73 killed.

The large crowd was celebrating the French national day, Bastille Day, along the waterfront, and the calamity took place as the fireworks were ending, which added to the confusion when gunfire was heard. 

(2016,
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(2016,
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The video shows a (large black) man lying on his back in the street, holding his hands in the air. "All he has is a toy truck," the man shouts, worried that the police may harm his autistic (white male) patient who had run away from the group. "I am a behavior therapist at a group home." Inexplicably, the caregiver is shot in the leg by police as he lays on the pavement with his patient sitting at his feet (like a protective puppy).

(2016,
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(2016,
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The Honourable Stéphane Dion, Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, and the Honourable Harjit Sajjan, Minister of National Defence, have announced that the Government of Canada has deployed the Canadian Disaster Assessment Team (CDAT) to Haiti and set aside up to $3 million as an initial humanitarian response for those in Haiti and other countries in the region affected by Hurricane Matthew.

RCMP members at risk
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Right on the heels of the Independent Review into the Moncton Shooting, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) suffered another violent gun attack on their stretched line of ­operational officers – this time near ­Edmonton – killing Const. David Wynn, and seriously injuring an unarmed Auxiliary officer.

(2015,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY CHIEF RHEAUME CHAPUT and SCOTT DAVIS

EM-COP: the New Reality of First Responder ­Technologies

(2015,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS [field_writer2]

The so-called “hard” landing  of an Air Canada A320 Airbus on final approach to Runway 05 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport (YHZ), on March 28th, has called into question airport emergency response capabilities at the airport, and the larger issue of provision of navaids to strengthen international aviation safety.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

The mind is the most powerful tool we have at our disposal, and its abilities shouldn’t be taken for granted. Memories stored in our brain constitute a large part of who we are, and our long-term memory allows us to memorize not only facts, but also repetitive physical movements. This is known as muscle memory, or motor learning, a type of procedural memory that is developed by programming a specific motor task or movement into the brain’s memory through repetition.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As I end my nine years as first Executive Editor of this fine magazine, and reflect upon the coming security challenges we face as Canadians in the next half decade and beyond, what has most struck me is the exponential increase in the number and complexity of security challenges and risks brought about by a myriad of important factors, the most prevalent of which is the dominating and increasing presence, influence and dependence upon the internet for everything in our much changed “every day lives”.

(2014,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY CAMERON HEKE

Those of us who live in Western Canada appreciate the traditional spirit of community service that permeates life in the Prairie provinces. One good example is the Shock and Trauma Air Rescue Service (STARS) organization, a non-profit helicopter air ambulance service that provides rapid and specialized emergency care and transportation for critically ill and injured patients. The service’s physicians, nurses, paramedics, and pilots work with a team of dedicated support staff and community partners to save lives.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY LANCE VALCOUR [field_writer2] and CHIEF JEFF BROOKS

Much activity and improvement in the realm of public safety communications interoperability have occurred since the horrific events of September 11th, 2001. One very promising area is that of wireless paramedicine, the ability to get paramedics, and the health community they support, the information they need when needed.

Interview: Paramedics
(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

FrontLine’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, recently took the opportunity to speak with Dwayne Forsman, the Chief Administrative Officer of the Paramedic Association of Canada and Greg Forsyth, Superintendent Special operations of the Ottawa Paramedic Service some questions about the evolution of their profession over the last years and get their opinions on future general needs and responsibilities. Dwayne has been a Paramedic for 37 years, in both rural and urban environments.

(2014,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LT. COL STEVEN SOLOMON

Civil Air Patrol’s rich history of protecting America will come full circle when the U.S. Air Force auxiliary ­officially ­celebrates its 75th anniversary in 2016.


Tow Target Unit No. 2 (1944)

(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 1)
BY STEVE ROWLAND [field_writer2]
(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY JENNIFER GIROUX

The 21st century has kicked off with a bang and opened the gates to an interconnected world where domestic and international borders are increasingly blurred. The last decade has witnessed the rise of transnational security threats posed by violent non-state actors, pandemics, climate change, ballooning economies, strains placed upon strategic, non-renewable energy resources, and significant technological advancements.

(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY GREG OULAHEN

There are people in Ontario who can’t sleep when it rains heavily at night because they have experienced a flooded basement too often. Homeowners in British Columbia are reminded of the fear and reality of ­losing their home and possessions each time they see televised images of uncontrolled wildfires in the U.S. and Australia. Many in the elderly and infirm population are nervous that summer heat waves may strain the electrical power system, threatening another disruptive blackout.

(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LAUREN WALTON

An Awakening

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]

In their November 2007 report entitled, A Resilient Canada: Governance for National Security and Public Safety, by Trevor Munn-Venn and Andrew Archibald, the Conference Board of Canada has produced an insightful analysis of how Canadians formulate and implement governance in their national security and public safety ­organizations. Interestingly, after interviewing public and private sector leaders and experts in this subject area, the Board found that the greatest threat to national security perceived by these experts is “a lack of clarity around governance.”

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY TONY BAUMGARTNER

As the nation reassesses its response to large scale disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and its preparedness for the threat of H5N1 flu pandemic, planners must also begin thinking about and preparing for the inevitable – mass fatality management. A mass fatality incident is defined as “any incident where the number of fatalities is greater than normal local arrangements can manage.” Any plan for dealing with fatalities needs to be integrated with all aspects of the response to and recovery from such incidents.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY JAY C. HOPE [field_writer2]
Practical Advice from Ontario’s Commissioner of Community Safety

Natural disasters can strike with ­little or no notice, causing large numbers of casualties and devastating local infrastructure. Impacts may include widespread power outages, road closures that block emergency response efforts, building collapses and structure fires. As the Com­missioner of Community Safety for Ontario and a for­mer Deputy Com­missioner of the Ontario Provincial Police, I know that within moments of a natural disaster striking, response resources and management systems can be stressed to the limit.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
Idassa 2007 Croatia

IDASSA 2007 is the second Natural Disaster exercise that the Republic of Croatia, in cooperation with NATO’s Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coord­ina­tion Centre (EADRCC), has organized on its territory. The majority of Croatian work for the exercise was organized and conducted by the National Protection and Reserve Directorate.


Croatioan Civil Protection Team on IDASSA exercise. (Photo: Dino Stanin)