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(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG FYFFE

The Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS) recently held a Symposium entitled “The Cyber Challenge.” Although the speakers focused on the national and international, and non-criminal aspects of the threat, the implications for those on the front lines of public safety are unmistakable.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT LINDLEY

Most security people are not aware that one of the leading gateways for hackers to attack their cyber systems is through their own physical security systems, especially their wired cameras or contactless card access control systems. Let’s look at the latter.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY HELEN OFOSU

There’s something you ought to know before you spend every spare nickel you have on firewalls and encryption for your iron-clad computer
network – if I wanted to steal your intellectual property, I’d find someone to walk in the front door and take it. Why?

(2016,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES

Are innovations making cities safer as they get smarter? At a recent conference entitled Smart Cities: Shaping the Future, held in the United Kingdom, experts from all over the world shared their stories of how technology is being applied in their cities to create a safer environment.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY PAUL ROGERS
5 Things the C-Suite Needs to Understand

“But... We Have a Very Robust IT Cyber Security System!”

While the typical CEO, IT director, or plant manager feels quite confident that they have a security system that will keep the foxes away from their IT coop, many have no idea that there is a viper, coiled and ready to strike at their unprotected plant, grid, refinery or other critical infrastructure where they deploy Operational Technology (OT). Why? First of all, many aren’t aware that or how their control system innovations can be exploited.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS

Critical issues loom from a national security, foreign policy and overall security perspective in the long term. The brief, but focused, Speech from the Throne on 4 December 2015 laid out broad parameters and included the new federal government’s position on defence:

(2015,
issue 2)
BY DAVID WAITS

(2015,
issue 2)
BY MAX NOMAD

Hackers and cybercriminals are coming up with more and more devious ways to steal every day. Some data breaches are huge, like the attacks on retail store Target and health insurer Anthem, allowing hackers to get access to millions of social security numbers, email address, credit card numbers and other personal information. Some are state-sponsored cyberattacks, like the recent massive data breach that affected virtually every U.S. government agency. The risks of identify theft have increased on a global scale.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY DALE O'GRADY
Lets CSOs Say Yes Instead of No

As Canadians, it’s in our DNA to be helpful and to avoid saying “no.” So why is it that “no” is the typical response from a security-minded IT organization when asked to enable a new application on the network? While it may not be the case everywhere, it is certainly widespread enough that in many organizations the CSO is often referred to as the CS-NO. That said, the CSO should certainly have our sympathies because he/she is confronted with a nearly impossible choice when it comes to balancing network productivity and network security.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY ERIC SPENCE

The Aite Group has published a new research report on consumer fraud around the world. The two-part report questions confidence that consumers have in their financial institutions. The first report, which focuses on attitudes toward fraud, found that 23% of fraud victims changed financial institutions due to dissatisfaction after experiencing fraud.

Global trends

(2013,

(May 2013) Will your organization, or one you work with, suffer a security breach this year? Nobody’s immune, no target is too small, or too large. The methods used by hackers to gain access to data are numerous, wide-reaching and ever-growing. This isn’t a threat you can afford to ignore.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY PETER HILLIER

You don’t need to be reminded that the bulk of security-related incidents that you face are sitting in your own office chairs. Although between the years the 2001-2004 CSI-FBI Computer Crime & Security Survey noted that “unauthorized use of computer systems” was on the decline with regard to financial losses, the same survey has now noted an increase in 2005.  Insider abuses of Net accesses were attributed at 56%, up from 53% the previous year.