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(2017,

 

Terror map reveals danger of segregation
by Andrew Gilligan and Sian Griffiths
The Sunday Times (London)
March 5 2017

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/terror-map-reveals-danger-of-segregation-k33jddhk0

(2016,

 

Airbus Defence and Space is designing and building a new constellation of optical satellites, comprising four identical and very agile sensors delivering very high-resolution imagery. The highly responsive dual VHR constellation will offer state-of-the art service to the Airbus Defence and Space imagery user’s community for the next decade.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS
Transport Canada’s National Aerial Surveillance Program

Canada takes a risk-based management approach to ship-source pollution response, and seeks to prevent marine pollution ­incidents. This prevention and response ­capability to deal with marine pollution incidents arising from ships is buttressed by the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). Administered by the Canadian Coast Guard from its inception in 1991 until 2003 when Transport Canada took on the responsibility, the NASP is an integral element of Canada’s ocean management.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY TIM DUNNE

The marine industry is an essential lifeline for so many of our daily needs. Annually, Canada’s commercial marine industry ­generates $10 billion in economic activity and $117 billion in international trade. It is responsible for 100,000 jobs that manage and move the 456 million tonnes of cargo annually.

Hugh Segal
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Canadians, generally, are concerned about the threat of ­terrorist activities. With the potential return of Omar Kadhr, the recent sentencing of a Toronto 18 member, and other events around the world, most realize that we are not immune to “home grown” terrorism.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Much has happened since our last edition. Three events in particular deserve mention here. First, I must commend Minister Toews for finally releasing the government’s first Federal Emergency Response Plan (FERP). With the Minister’s announcement of the FERP, Public Safety Canada has successfully responded to the call from many, including the Auditor General, to take the lead in setting policy and procedures for a robust response to any national emergency.

Lt-General Michael Jeffery
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Canada Must Face the Potential for Domestic and Global Threats!

(2010,
issue 1)
BY INDUSTRY SHOWCASE
Safeguard personnel from all types of hazards

Securing Canadian military installations is essential to fighting terrorism. ­However, base commanders understand that their force protection security ­system must also safeguard military personnel, their families, and civilian contractors from all types of hazards. To accomplish this, security planning must anticipate intelligent, adaptive adversaries and large-scale emergencies that ­create terror and confusion, and complicate response by causing multiple, simultaneous incidents.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

Effective Understanding for Decision-Making
We can see from the definitions offered in Part 1 of this article (see Winter 2009/2010 edition) that an “effective understanding” of the Maritime Domain must come from a knowledge of the facts -- whether they originate from geo-spatial surveillance and reconnaissance data or intelligence analysis and assessment.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON

For six generations, approximately 95 percent of the Canada-US border was undefended; official crossing points were the chief exception. The boundary between our nation and the United States spans 6,416 kilometres – 2,878 km on land and 3,538 km on water – and includes terrain that is flat, hilly, and mountainous, vast tracks of prairie and forests, and lakes, rivers, creeks, and marshes. For decades, governments on both sides have tried to curtail smuggling and human trafficking.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

In a way, the “Brampton 18” is also an indicator of the change we have seen since 9/11. In one corner, we have seen civil liberties be reaffirmed with the demise of the vague and damaging security certificate; in the other corner we see the Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Anti-Terrorism Act in triumph with the pleas of guilty to terrorism charges that three of the 18 have made.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY SHANE LOATES
Increase Awareness and Decrease Response Times

Today’s security environment demands integrated solutions that minimize risks by maximizing the available information to security personnel. Fortunately, software solutions can help to tie legacy systems together into a common operational picture to help you get the most from your investments.

Dr. Ed Amoroso
(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Dr. Ed Amoroso, AT&T’s Chief Security Officer, with over 20 years in this field, was in Ottawa recently, speaking at a Cyber Security Conference by the ­Conference Board of Canada on Proactive Defence of Critical Systems and Information.

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In this our Fall issue, we have chosen to focus on Canada’s Maritime Security – ­primarily because of concerns following recent Senate Committee reports, and the obvious impact that a continued lack of reasonable maritime security would have on our safety and prosperity.

Senator Colin Kenny
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

One of the most knowledgeable and comprehensive examinations of the state of our Maritime Security has been one conducted by the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence. For the last six years, during its study, it has heard testimony, examined data, held regional hearings and visited our ports. The Committee has twice published its recommendations in ominously titled reports: Canada’s Coastlines The longest undefended borders in the World (2003), and a rather damning update of this initial report, entitled simply Coasts (2007).

(2007,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS
Canadian Maritime Domestic Security

National Security – The Sea Matters
Over the last six years, in the changed global security environment, Canadians have learned that National Security is a modern imperative that requires profound thought, development, investment, resourcing, and, most of all, government leadership and action. The new threat environment includes globalized threats such as terrorism, multi-national crime organizations, disease epidemics, and ­natural disasters – not simply traditional, state-oriented threats.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY R.J. QUINN

With the longest coastline in the world (243,772 km), and a marine area of responsibility of over 11 million square kilo­meters, Canada faces a formidable surveillance challenge! Along these shores are 250 ports and, on a typical day, 1700 ships are in our area of responsibility. It is important to know exactly what is happening in the ocean approaches to our borders. The goal in marine security, therefore, is to obtain “domain awareness” so that we can deal with potential threats before they get too close.