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(2017,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]
A new approach for addressing complex projects and procurements

At FrontLine, we search out new ideas and concepts that could help enhance safety and security.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

In one of my early columns, I made the point in that FrontLine needs to look at keeping the general population safe and secure more broadly than we had in the past. Food safety, for example, is important and not just from the perspective of bio-terrorism threats. The animal connection to safety and security was addressed in a prior issue. Manufacturers of safety and security equipment also play an important role through their equipment research and development. Future issues of FrontLine will look at aviation safety and more.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Providing information that will help our frontline responders keep us safer and more secure is the overriding objective of FrontLine Safety and Security. To this end, I am always on the lookout for ideas, research, and other materials that can be presented to our readers. In our Winter edition of the magazine, we will be focusing on police analytics.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

The recent summit of the “three amigos” – hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and involving U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto – brought considerable excitement to the Ottawa area. The wide ranging topics discussed and agreements signed during the short 1-day event are a testament to the strength of the relationships.

SPECIAL REPORT 2016
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
It’s a Big Deal

Introduction

Editor's Corner
(2016,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

In 2010 Police Chief magazine published an article titled: “s”. In it, they wrote about the critical role that needs to be played by local law enforcement in proactively preventing terrorism.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

No doubt there is much pressure to re-examine on your election pledge regarding Canada’s role in the fight against ISIS and we at FrontLine add our voice to this request, ­particularly in light of recent and escalating events.

Editor's Corner
(2015,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]
A Request to FrontLine Readers

It has been an interesting first few months for me as the new editor of Frontline Safety and Security. I have spent the last few months meeting with organizations tasked with, or interested in, keeping the public safe – let’s call them partners in safety and security. These have included various intelligence organizations, associations, first responders, and Universities.

Editor's Corner
(2014,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

General Clive Addy steered this magazine throughout its first nine formative years; following in his footsteps will be a distinct honour. Throughout the many years of service to his country, he has given much. Upon retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces, he found a unique way to continue to serve his country – he used this magazine as a vehicle to promote awareness of the need to enhance national security. It is with pleasure that I have accepted the position of incoming Executive Editor of FrontLine Security magazine.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As I end my nine years as first Executive Editor of this fine magazine, and reflect upon the coming security challenges we face as Canadians in the next half decade and beyond, what has most struck me is the exponential increase in the number and complexity of security challenges and risks brought about by a myriad of important factors, the most prevalent of which is the dominating and increasing presence, influence and dependence upon the internet for everything in our much changed “every day lives”.

Editor's Corner
(2014,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
A Key Strategic Goal

This edition of Frontline Security is dedicated primarily to the international impact of cyber attacks upon the reliability and security of all critical infrastructure ­systems. You will be reminded that tremendous risks are being taken in this field, and that we face great complexity in effectively mitigating these, be they in public, private or joint sectors. In my own examination of present government policy and public-private coordination, I have found the measures wanting, and the pace of adjustments glacial, as the threats evolve at jet speed. 

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As we head into 2014, FrontLine Security offers some very pertinent ­reflections on the complex challenges of policing and disaster management. I trust that our articles will stimulate the additional discussion and debate.

First, Dr. Michael Kempa, a most respected researcher in his field, gives us a broad but comprehensive perspective on challenges in modern Canadian Policing in this more complex, and interconnected global environment, and the correspondingly changing face of Canadian community policing.

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Roots
We have dedicated this issue to Border Security. It is both timely and important that we do so, for we North American neighbours find ourselves at a critical juncture in this more globally accessible and competitive world where we benefit from reasonably stable governments, are blessed by vast territory, rich resources, significantly intertwined economies and secular institutions open to all members of our society.

Editor's Corner
(2012,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

We are on the eve of the 10th anniversary of the creation of a single Canadian federal department focused on “Public Safety.” After 9-11, an obvious need to form a more robust coordination of our National Security. Thus, from the Solicitor General Branch and the Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Emergency Preparedness (OCIPEP) in the 90’s, the Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada was created in 2003, headed by Minister Anne McLellan.

Editor's Corner
(2012,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Frontline Security continues its thrust to influence national security policies – to enable citizens, first responders and government officials to protect Canadians as we would expect in today’s world. One of the major determinants of this world is the rise in overall influence, for good and bad, of the cyber presence. This edition includes many articles on technology and the sharing of information to elicit better responses to safety and security challenges.

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

We are closing in on 15 years since the infamous Ice Storm crippled much of Eastern Ontario, Western ­Quebec, and the Northeastern States. Many remember the feeble briefings provided by authorities during the first few days – when power pole numbers, rather than geographical locations, were used to describe power outages to a troubled and doubly confused public. The worrying was shared by citizens unable to heat, cook, travel, wash or get medical treatment... or even get the flawed information. Are we better prepared now than we were then?

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Tsunamis, earthquakes and nuclear crises in Japan, droughts in China, the “Arab Spring” upheavals, Osama dead, Ratko captured, tornadoes in southern U.S., floods in Australia and, at home, fires in Alberta, floods in Manitoba and Quebec ... These and other situations force us to focus on the question: “What is the state of our emergency preparedness and security?”

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

We need a National Security Policy with teeth, now. Particularly its Emergency ­Preparedness and Critical Infrastructure ­Protection elements, and one which allies, neighbours, businesses, provinces and municipalities can, with confidence, know is indeed protecting our citizens and resources reliably… as most, incorrectly, expect we now do.

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

The flu season is upon us and the new ­vaccine is arriving as we go to press. We are grateful again to Dr. David Butler-Jones, Canada’s Chief Medical Officer, (whom we interviewed in our last edition), for his hard work and calm preparation. We also salute the public health workers across the country for their dedication and help in keeping the effects of this pandemic to a minimum in our communities.

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

First, Canada’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. David Butler-Jones, provides a ­snapshot of his current challenges, reflects on pandemic preparedness, and gives sound advice on our individual responsibilities with H1N1 on the immediate horizon.

Jennifer Giroux from the Centre for Security Studies in Zurich, highlights the importance of community involvement in preparation for a pending natural disaster. She notes that, with proper training,  we can all have a local role to play.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our common border with the United States stretches across 8,893 kilometers (5,526 miles) of land and three oceans. According to Gov­ernment of Canada statistics, the annual two-way trade in goods and services between Canada and the U.S. in 2007 was worth over C$576 billion. Clearly, border security is a vital component of our ­economic security.

Mark Camillo
(2007,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
Of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver

After meeting Mark Camillo at a recent Conference Board of Canada event covering the Transportation Security Challenges of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, contacted him again in Washington for a more in-depth ­discussion of his insights on this topic. His ­extensive experience in these matters provides an objective view of the security challenges facing Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver... and beyond.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

The theme of this issue is very pertinent as it follows on the heels of recent ­pronouncements by Prime Minister Harper in Vancouver this summer and by U.S. President Bush in September. As part of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, there is need for a great and mutual effort on all sides to ensure the free and expeditious flow of legitimate persons and goods between our two countries. This implies a mutual trust in agreed identification systems for these persons and goods.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In this fickle Canada of six-month business plans and two-year governments influenced by the latest polls or stock-market prices, and where “second quarter results” are used as an indication of long term profitability, and “reality” TV is ­distracting us from the dangerously true reality, are we ready for a necessary, ­difficult and prolonged commitment to... anything? Is there the pragmatic ­realization that we are now at war… really?

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Over four and a half years have passed since 9/11, over two since the creation of Canada’s Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, over two from the Madrid train bombings, and nearly one since the London subway attacks. Spurred into action by these horrific events, over $9.5 billion was announced by the past government in our first National Security Policy, aimed at improving the overall security of Canadians.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

I am very pleased to launch FRONTLINE SECURITY in the wake of the change in our national Government. One of the elements that we believe was called for in this change is a clearer and more knowledgeable debate of broader national security issues and their impact on our well-being and democratic society. Our magazine has been designed to offer such a national voice to this debate in a more security-conscious Canadian society. Just as Julian Fantino says of Emergency Preparedness in his interview in this issue, our own magazine is also “a work in progress.”