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(2017,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF
A new approach for addressing complex projects and procurements

At FrontLine, we search out new ideas and concepts that could help enhance safety and security.

Port Security
(2017,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS , KILEY SAMPSON and DARRYL ANDERSON

Is the present security regime sufficiently robust and resilient when it comes to marine terminals? Ranging in size from small passenger docks to large, sophisticated multimillion-dollar cargo loading facilities, they are often situated near urban areas or sensitive marine environments, and may involve a variety of dangerous goods.


Port of Vancouver

(2017,

 

As reported in "The Independent"
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/smoking-out-the-cowboy-indians-a7494456.html

With Donald Trump only weeks away from his inauguration, talk of walls along the Mexican border have – for the moment at least – fallen from the agenda. But another border is fast becoming a problem.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JAMES NORRIE and STEPHANIE NESBITT
Into the Cyber Breach Go the U.S. Government Regulators

Has cybersecurity evolved to become a true profession, with a requirement for regulatory standards? If so, who will make those decisions? Cyber security efforts clearly fulfill an undeniably critical function in contributing to protection of our ever-expanding global online world, and in this article, we argue that recent U.S. court decisions signal the global arrival of the cybersecurity profession at an important crossroads.

Data Breach

SPECIAL REPORT
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Canada bears the general strain and impact of illicit tobacco the same as many communities and countries around the world, and yet the conditions in Canada are somewhat unique in that the black market for illegal smokes is largely self-imposed.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

Why are conference events so good for intelligence? Because they bring the experts together customers, competitors, government regulators, suppliers, ­academics and so forth – experts with information. From a collection perspective, people attend events with the objective of exchanging information, so they are keen to talk.

(2015,

(Aug 2009) CDFAI Fellow, Colin Robertson describes how the Canadian banking system and good government initiatives have helped the nation weather the economic recession and garner the rare distinction as the only country in the industrialized world that has not faced a single bank failure, nor called for bailouts or government intervention in financial and mortgage sectors. CDFAI is now called the Canadian Global Affairs Institute.

(2014,
By the World Economic Forum
One Last Thing
(2013,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

One of the most important issues in policy development is to make sure that the subject being scrutinized is accurately identified so the right questions can be asked to help get the most effective answers. This is critical because the converse is also true; ask the wrong questions and you will get the wrong answers.

Interview: Dr Michael Kempa
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Dr Michael Kempa is an Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa, and a freelance journalist who enjoys diving into the messy reality of the politics and economics of policing and security. Editor Clive Addy talks to him about the current situation of rising costs without the benefit of rising budgets.

RCMP C/Supt Joe Oliver
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1986, Chief Superintendent Oliver became Director General Border Integrity in April 2009. He was responsible for overseeing the delivery of five law enforcement programs that contribute to the national security of Canada, and the protection of Canadians from terrorism, orga­nized crime, and other ­border-related criminality.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY RAY BOISVERT

He was an award-winning horticulturalist successfully growing the rarest of orchids. He was an expert fly fisher and a documenter of river systems. He was a poet and ­publisher, as well as a long time correspondent of T.S. Eliot. He was schooled in the art of New Criticism while attending Yale, and later studied law at Harvard. But more than anything, he was the unrelenting hunter of “moles” within the CIA and, by extension, many governments and agencies of the Western world during the height of the Cold War.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY GUY CHAMBERLAIN

James Arden Barnett
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

An interview with Rear Admiral (Ret) James Arden Barnett, Chief, Federal Communications Commission,U.S. Bureau of Public Safety and Homeland Security,discussing the 700MHz bandwidth situation in the USA.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY
A Strategic Overview

Seldom do Canadians, as a nation, look much beyond next week, next month or next year. We tend to be laid-back and blasé about our future. We engage in a game of self-deception by assuming that the threat of any major harm is restricted solely to a major environmental event, such as blizzards, hurricanes or flooding, created by climate change.

(2011,
issue 1)

In the first week following Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s ousting from office, the residents of Cairo celebrated the promise of a new and democratic state. In a country that has known a central government for 6000 years, the aftermath of the February Revolution marks the first time in Egypt’s political history that the people may have the opportunity to elect their own leader. In this crucial and delicate post-revolutionary phase, the military’s Supreme Council of the Armed Forces has taken control of the country.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY MARIO D'ANGELO

Post September 11, 2001, an increased sense of urgency has been paid to the threat of terrorism; more specifically, to the possibility that terrorists might resort to the use of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear resources in a deliberate act of aggression. This notion was certainly reinforced when, in 2001, a domestic terrorist(s) mailed letters containing anthrax through the United States Postal System.

(2010,
By FinTrac

(Dec 2010) This report Summarizes relevant group-based, activity-based and country-based money laundering and terrorist activity financing issues. It alerts readers to new developments that could possibly be exploited for money laundering or terrorist activity financing purposes in Canada.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY JENNIFER GIROUX

The 21st century has kicked off with a bang and opened the gates to an interconnected world where domestic and international borders are increasingly blurred. The last decade has witnessed the rise of transnational security threats posed by violent non-state actors, pandemics, climate change, ballooning economies, strains placed upon strategic, non-renewable energy resources, and significant technological advancements.

(2009,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS

A Strategic Imperative

(2009,
By the World Economic Forum

(Sept 2009) Issued by the Geneva-based World Economic Forum, this year's Report profiles a total of 133 economies, providing the most comprehensive assessment of its kind, with an extensive section of data tables and global rankings covering over 100 indicators.

(2009,
The World Bank

(Jan 2009) Grim descriptions of the long‐term consequences of climate change have given the impression that the climate impacts from greenhouse gases threaten long‐ term economic growth. However, the impact of climate change on the global economy is likely to be quite small over the next 50 years. Severe impacts even by the end of the century are unlikely. The greatest threat that climate change poses to long‐term economic growth is from potentially excessive near‐term mitigation efforts.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ADRIAN KING

Piracy on the high seas has been making the news headlines; most notably with the audacious hijacking in November of the Saudi-owned super tanker Sirius Star. At present the vessel, together with its multinational crew, languishes off the Somali coastal town of Hardeheere while negotiators attempt to reach an agreement with the present illegal custodians over a ransom payment for its release. The Sirius Star is just one of many vessels hijacked in recent times by pirates operating from Somali coastal towns and ports.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ALAN BURKE
Report from the UN Climate Change Conference

Climate change, resource depletion, health, security, economics, and politics are ­inextricably intertwined.


Air pollution in the Valley of Mexico. (Photo: C. Mcnaughton. U. of Hawaii)

Public and Private Information Sharing
(2007,
issue 4)
BY JIM ROBBINS

Motivated partially by self-preservation, but also by a “carrot & stick” combination of grants and threats of litigation – the public and private sector “information sharing and analysis” that occurred prior to Y2K was unprecedented.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY DOUG HARRISON

Although it is difficult to actually pinpoint when emergency management emerged as a recognizable and distinct profession, it can safely be said that the idea or concept of practitioners schooled in risk management started to evolve in the 1990’s. By the early 2000’s, emergency management was both the buzzword and the business!

(2007,
issue 2)
BY MARK EGENER

THE ALBERTA EXPERIENCE FOLLOWING THE AUGUST 2005 DERAILMENT AT LAKE WABAMUN
Regions and municipalities deal with crises on a somewhat regular basis and therfore tend to maintain their readiness levels, however, major disasters that call for special resources do not happen very often. The tendency then, especially as events fade into the past, is to let our preparedness guards down. This is perhaps more true at the federal and provincial/state ­levels that are further removed from first response demands.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY TANYA ELLIOT

Across the world and across the street, on the battlefield or at the scene of disaster, where there are signs of trouble you will see one of the most recognized symbols in the world: the Red Cross. With a legislated role as “auxiliary to the public authorities,” in addition to its non-profit status, humanitarian mission, volunteer-driven structure, and long history in disaster management, the Red Cross has a unique vantage point to gain knowledge from lessons learned and promote best practices in disaster management for the volunteer, non-profit sector.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY GORDON McBEAN

Weather-related hazardous events have always affected responders but the frequency of these natural ­disasters has been increasing – from 2-4 per year in earlier decades to about 12 per year in the last decade (with considerable year-to-year variability).


May 2007 - Lake City, Florida. The Florida Bugaboo Fire rages out of control as firefighters wait for a helicopter to bring a load of water. (Photo: Mark Wolfe/FEMA)

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Over four and a half years have passed since 9/11, over two since the creation of Canada’s Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, over two from the Madrid train bombings, and nearly one since the London subway attacks. Spurred into action by these horrific events, over $9.5 billion was announced by the past government in our first National Security Policy, aimed at improving the overall security of Canadians.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD COHEN
Government can't do it alone

After 9/11, governments around the globe sprang to respond to the new threat. In Canada, the federal government implemented major structural changes and ­allocated billions of dollars to strengthen National Security and Public Safety. As well, recent natural catastrophes and ­public health scares have reminded us that terrorism is not the only danger we face. Although most governments have reacted energetically to these new challenges, the rest of society, including the business community, have for the most part, been sitting on the sidelines.

By the International Labour Organization

Economic security promotes happiness, and is beneficial for growth and social stability. This is a central finding of a new ILO report, which attempts for the first time to measure social and economic security of individuals and countries around the world.