Search

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

In one of my early columns, I made the point in that FrontLine needs to look at keeping the general population safe and secure more broadly than we had in the past. Food safety, for example, is important and not just from the perspective of bio-terrorism threats. The animal connection to safety and security was addressed in a prior issue. Manufacturers of safety and security equipment also play an important role through their equipment research and development. Future issues of FrontLine will look at aviation safety and more.

Editor's Corner
(2016,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

In 2010 Police Chief magazine published an article titled: “s”. In it, they wrote about the critical role that needs to be played by local law enforcement in proactively preventing terrorism.

(2015,

(July 2009) This article presents insight to the realistic possibilities of mass Internet surveillance by refuting the common argument is that there is too much traffic to be able to "listen" to all chatter.

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our Roots
We have dedicated this issue to Border Security. It is both timely and important that we do so, for we North American neighbours find ourselves at a critical juncture in this more globally accessible and competitive world where we benefit from reasonably stable governments, are blessed by vast territory, rich resources, significantly intertwined economies and secular institutions open to all members of our society.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As we embark on 2013, it is timely to reflect on the state of the various components of the security sector in Canada including to note progress made and action required. To do that, it’s helpful to reflect on that which happened in 2012…and that which didn’t because for both reasons it was a year of great significance for safety and security issues in Canada. This factual analysis will also demonstrate what needs action now.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY BARBARA McISAAC
Security vs Privacy

“He can either stand with us or with the Child Pornographers.” With those words, in response to a question from Liberal MP Francis Scarpaleggia, Public Safety Minister, Vic Toews may have put an end to Bill C-30, The Investigating and Preventing Criminal ­Electronic Communications Act. The short title of the bill, which no doubt gave rise to Toews comments, is the Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

View PDF

Situational awareness is crucial in a CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear and/or Explosive) incident. 


Instrument View displays live images and data, and replays data stored from a database.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY YVON DESLAURIERS

Technology has made it possible for anybody to buy very sophisticated electronic devices from a local spy shop or simply online. Such low-cost gadgets can cost your company millions of dollars. Industrial Espionage is more common than we tend to believe -- billions of dollars are lost every year. While many things can be done to prevent the theft of information, it is very difficult to guard against listening devices.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON
How Secure Are They?

At 6:41 p.m. local time on 19 January 2010, a woman arrived at the luxury Al Bustan Rotana hotel in Dubai, accompanied by a large man in a Panama hat. Unbeknownst to hotel staff or authorities in the popular emirate, the couple were part of a clandestine group sent to Dubai to track and kill Mahmoud al-Mabhouh, a senior Hamas commander.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

The largest security operation in Canadian history ­successfully wrapped up the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. Main security operations ended 48 hours after the principal sporting events finished. Security needs for the Paralympic Games (March 12-21) were ­significantly reduced.

 

(2009,
issue 4)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER

Video surveillance cameras have been used widely for two or three decades and are now so prevalent that almost every Canadian living in an urban environment is captured on camera at some point in their day.


Video cameras have been widely used for two or three decades and are now so prevalent that almost every Canadian living in an urban environment is captured on camera at some point in their day.

One Last Thing
(2009,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

The purposeful monitoring of activities and actions of persons or things of specified interest has been with us from cavemen watching neighbouring tribes to Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride to chain smoking cops with binoculars on stakeout. What’s changed, and always will change, are the tactics, technologies and targets the ‘good guys’ use in the identified service of the common good. What’s also changed is the sophistication of the ‘bad guy’s’ wilful surveillance of the ‘good guys’ or what’s known in criminal and security circles as counter surveillance.

(2009,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD VINCIGUERRA

Public transportation systems offer significant potential targets for terrorist attack, as the large numbers of people in enclosed environments would contribute greatly to the devastating effects of biological and chemical weapons. However, there are options available to address this type of threat.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY DAVE McMAHON

Proactive Cyber Defence doctrine compels an ­enterprise to act by interdicting and disrupting an attack preemptively in self-defence to oppose an attack against their computer infrastructure.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY TIM LYNCH

Both the United States and Canada are currently engaged in public debates involving intellectual property rights in their defence industries. The Canada’s Standing Committee on Industry is hearing appeals from military experts about the pending acquisition of the information and geospatial divisions of MacDonald Dettwiler and Associates (MDA), a company based in British Columbia. The sale, to U.S.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY NORMA REVELER

Radar surveillance systems have long been proven to be effective security tools in military applications – and now are affordable enough to be used by homeland security and law enforcement agencies that have tight budgets.


Accipter Radar tracks displayed at Operations Centre

One Last Thing
(2007,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As this issue of FrontLine Security illustrates, the marine component of domestic security measures has never been as important for Canada as it is today. The reasons for this is, of course, are fairly obvious.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY R.J. QUINN

With the longest coastline in the world (243,772 km), and a marine area of responsibility of over 11 million square kilo­meters, Canada faces a formidable surveillance challenge! Along these shores are 250 ports and, on a typical day, 1700 ships are in our area of responsibility. It is important to know exactly what is happening in the ocean approaches to our borders. The goal in marine security, therefore, is to obtain “domain awareness” so that we can deal with potential threats before they get too close.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY TIM CONNORS

Chief among their conclusions ought to be that this threat has global reach and is alive and well – and that there is no silver bullet counter measure that will prevent the next attack. Both assessments have profound meaning for how our state and local public safety agencies are organizing and preparing their people for this new age of security.