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(2017,

Seaspan Ferries Corporation (SFC) officially welcomed two new, state-of-the-art dual-fuelled/hybrid (liquefied natural gas, diesel and battery) vessels to its fleet today during a double commissioning ceremony held at SFC’s Tilbury Terminal.
 

(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG FYFFE

The Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS) recently held a Symposium entitled “The Cyber Challenge.” Although the speakers focused on the national and international, and non-criminal aspects of the threat, the implications for those on the front lines of public safety are unmistakable.

(2016,

Experts are meeting today and tomorrow at Carleton University to discuss “the challenges of dealing with natural resource development projects and activism" - or, in the words of one participant, how to protect Canada's infrastructure from "domestic extremists".

(2016,

Jim Carr, the federal natural resources minister says his government will use police and military forces for ensure opposition to new pipelines remains peaceful. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and Line 3 replacement both received approval Tuesday.

Surveillance-to-Intelligence
(2014,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Great progress has been made since 2007 when Frontline Security first reported on radar surveillance technology designed for use in the homeland by public safety organizations, whose responsibilities include border security, search and rescue, transportation security, and law enforcement.


Typical radar node.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY DEPARTMENT of FISHERIES and OCEANS STAFF

OPERATION DRIFTNET – Charged with monitoring and protecting the state of the vulnerable resources that lay below, Frank Snelgrove (below) hovers above the North Pacific Ocean in a CP-140 Aurora aircraft, monitoring the endless expanse of water for hours on end.


Frank Snelgrove stands near a CP-140 Aurora preparing for duty.

(2014,
By Natural Resources Canada

Our understanding of climate change impacts and adaptation in Canada has increased, both as a result of new research and through practical experience. Led by Natural Resources Canada, the development of this report involved over 90 authors and 115 expert reviewers, and synthesized over 1500 recent publications.

(2012,

(2011) Health care facilities need to develop an Emergency Water Supply Plan (EWSP) to prepare for, respond to, and recover from a total or partial interruption of the facilities' normal water supply because water supplies can, and do, fail. The objective of this Planning Guide is to help health care facilities develop a robust EWSP as part of its overall facility EOP and to meet the published standards set forth by the Joint Commission and the CMS. The guide is intended for use by any health care facility, regardless of size or patient capacity.

(2010,

(Jan 2010) As crude oil prices climbed back over US$80.00 per barrel during 2009 (after the dramatic spike to $147 and subsequent collapse to $35) U.S. politicians and regulators knew who to blame.

(2009,
By the Centre for Contemporary Conflict

(Dec 2009) The capability for global resource competition to serve as a driver for conflict has established the need to more fully examine the relationship between energy resources and conflict. In particular, oil resources have emerged as a potential driver for both internal and external conflict. By James E. McGinley.

(2009,

(May 2009) The global LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) shipping, handling and storage infrastructure is extremely vulnerable to a terrorist attack which, if successful, could have catastrophic results – both in terms of lives lost and economic impact. Securing this infrastructure is quickly becoming a top national security priority.

(2009,

(April 2009) A Chatham House Briefing Paper by Cleo Paskal on environment-related disruptions to hydroelectric installations, offshore oil and gas production, pipelines, electrical transmission and nuclear power generation.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

The protection of critical infrastructure is a key national security issue in a way that it has not been since the ‘snakes and ladders’ days of the late 1950s and the early Cold War civil defence program. Today’s threat has changed from Soviet rockets to various state and non-state actors armed with an equally wide variety of weapons. With this revolution in military affairs, has come a renewed interest in asymmetric confrontation of the Superpower and its NATO and Western Allies.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY JUDY BRADT

Follow the Money
Most first responder activities are carried out at the state and local government level, but the majority of funding for programs and equipment come from ­federal grants.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

Canadians have been forced to learn a great deal about National Security in the four years since 9/11. However, it is only since the London bombings in 2005, and the 2006 wartime deaths of a Canadian diplomat and Canadian soldiers by the al Qaeda-affiliated Taliban in Afghanistan, that we have collectively (and reluctantly) ventured into the macabre risk-management equation of security against global militant Jihadist terrorism.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY JAMES COX

Some analysts have noted inadequacies in certain Canadian national security strategies. The fault may lie elsewhere. Any strategy, no matter how robust and well thought out, will not be fully effective in a policy vacuum, because strategy is derived from policy, or at least it should be. Without a sound policy to provide guidance and context, strategy is like the Maple Leafs at the end of the regular hockey season – lots of activity, but going nowhere.