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(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

In one of my early columns, I made the point in that FrontLine needs to look at keeping the general population safe and secure more broadly than we had in the past. Food safety, for example, is important and not just from the perspective of bio-terrorism threats. The animal connection to safety and security was addressed in a prior issue. Manufacturers of safety and security equipment also play an important role through their equipment research and development. Future issues of FrontLine will look at aviation safety and more.

Interview: Dr Jim Anderson
(2016,
issue 4)

Dr. Jim Anderson manages the Biological Warfare Threat Medical Countermeasures project at the Deptartment of National Defence (DND). He recently sat down with FrontLine editor Chris MacLean to discuss the challenges and implications of the biological threat and related preparedness requirements.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr

Could powerful molecular methodologies be used to engineer new bioweapons, or will it bring new hope for cures to devastating diseases?

(2016,
issue 4)
PAUL ROMEO

OFFICER TRAINING

(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG RICHARDS, MBA, Ph.D, FCMC

Many public safety organizations are keenly interested in deriving value from the massive amounts of data currently available to them. In situations were analytic staff are not available to work with this data, or when it makes sense to analyze data in several different ways, organizations are partnering with educational institutions.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

Police analytics can be extremely valuable in the fight against terrorism and crime. By identifying which events are most likely to escalate, predictive techniques can both improve prevention capability and control costs by deploying officers before escalation and where they are needed most.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

Police analytics has been gaining more and more attention (which means FrontLine readers will see more on this topic in future editions). When the Ottawa Police Services began looking into it, they identified some 150 police analytics centers in the United States alone.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY FRONTLINE STAFF
Closing the Public Safety and Security Technology Gap

As the complexity and reach of global threats continues to increase, the demands on public safety and first responders are also growing.
Recent reports – including studies by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and public safety organizations around the world – have confirmed that first responders want timelier mission-critical information to decrease response times and detect and mitigate threats before they happen. Interestingly, this is similar to what militaries around the world need for the battlefield.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG FYFFE

The Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS) recently held a Symposium entitled “The Cyber Challenge.” Although the speakers focused on the national and international, and non-criminal aspects of the threat, the implications for those on the front lines of public safety are unmistakable.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JAMES NORRIE and STEPHANIE NESBITT
Into the Cyber Breach Go the U.S. Government Regulators

Has cybersecurity evolved to become a true profession, with a requirement for regulatory standards? If so, who will make those decisions? Cyber security efforts clearly fulfill an undeniably critical function in contributing to protection of our ever-expanding global online world, and in this article, we argue that recent U.S. court decisions signal the global arrival of the cybersecurity profession at an important crossroads.

Data Breach

One Last Thing
(2016,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

The issue of national security oversight and review has re-emerged following the recent scathing judgement of M. Justice Noel (2016 FC 1105) regarding CSIS’ deliberate cover up of its ‘metadata’ gathering and retention of personal information of Canadians.