Search

(2017,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY CHARLES "BUTCH" FARABEE

It’s one thing to be “stuck” in an urban setting with its amenities, resources, and immediate responses. It is quite another when stuck in, on, or under a cliff, river, or snowbank, in the middle of the vertical world of Yosemite Valley, or the expansive, remote areas the park is also famous for. 

Wilderness search and rescue (SAR) is a whole different ball game – unquestionably true for Yosemite National Park

(2017,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY
New algorithms improve reliability

The first big case involving fingerprint evidence in the United States was the murder trial of Thomas Jennings in Chicago in 1911. Jennings had broken into a home in the middle of the night and, when discovered by the homeowner, shot the man dead. He was convicted based on fingerprints left at the crime scene, and for most of the next century, fingerprints were considered, both in the courts and in the public imagination, to be all but infallible as a method of identification.

(2017,
issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Tragedies at Paris, Brussels, Orlando, Nice, Berlin, Manchester, London, and other recent incidents in the West have galvanized a wave of self-reflection for both policymakers and individuals. The grief, confusion, and anger that comes about in the days following such attacks typically brings with it a deeper introspection into the best practices to prevent and respond to acts of terror aimed at ‘soft targets’ of civilian entertainment and daily life. 

(2017,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR GILMORE [field_writer2]

Most would agree that atrocities happening in places like Mali, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and numerous other corners of hell in the world should be stopped. But hard lessons in Afghanistan have taught us that spending precious blood and gold 
may not make the kind of difference needed to set some of these regions firmly towards a path away from lawless anarchy. 

(2017,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]
A Review of the Facts

Canadians recently learned that their federal government had decided to issue an apology to Omar Khadr and to provide him with $10.5M in ‘compensation’. The apology and payment were purportedly made to settle an outstanding civil suit brought by Khadr for alleged violations of his Charter rights by Canada while he was detained by the U.S.

(2017,
issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Primarily as a result of globalization and the democratization of information to the masses, the theory and practice of politics and governance have been undergoing a steady evolution.


Trump delivers Joint Address to Congress. (Official White House Photo: Shealah Craighead)

(2017,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]
Canada’s Anti-Terrorism Bill 2.0

With the return of Parliament on the near horizon, one of the security issues sure to attract attention (apart from the Omar Khadr $10.5M payoff and the Liberal government’s deer-in-the-headlights approach to the flood of persons illegally entering Canada to claim ‘refugee’ status) is what exactly is in Bill C-59 and how is it different from the Conservative’s much maligned C-51?

(2017,
issue 2)
BY SEAN CANN-SHEPPARD [field_writer2]
For First Responders

The ever increasing threat of bio-terrorism has led to modernizing the way we prepare for a potential outbreak.

(2017,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY HAMID KARIMI
A Cause for Insomnia

Imagine you are on a hospital bed attached to devices and sensors that a malintent individual across the world can digitally find and manipulate. This is a nightmare scenario. By some accounts, a typical intensive care bed has more than a dozen sensors, most of which are network connected, and at least few of them are connected to the Internet. 

(2017,
issue 2)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]

Three decades ago, the Cold War was still raging and conflict between states represented the principal threat to international security and nuclear deterrence was the game. Then came the collapse of the Soviet bloc, the rise of transnational terrorism and the Internet. Fast-forward to today and we have a multitude of security challenges that were never envisioned, from cyber-espionage to super-empowered non-state actors.

(2017,
issue 2)
[field_writer2]

Britain’s Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain naïvely described the pre-WWII disputes as being a “quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing”. It seems that Canada’s government is looking at the North Korean (DPRK) problem through the same lens: as a regional conflict that will involve South Korea, Japan and America, but remain peripheral to Canadian interests and security – definitely not an existential threat to Canada.