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(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG FYFFE [field_writer2]

The Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS) recently held a Symposium entitled “The Cyber Challenge.” Although the speakers focused on the national and international, and non-criminal aspects of the threat, the implications for those on the front lines of public safety are unmistakable.

(2016,
issue 1)
[field_writer2]

Over the past few years, Canada has come under harsh criticism for not doing enough to thwart money-laundering operations that funnel the proceeds of criminal activity, such as  terrorism and the importation and sale of illicit drugs, through seemingly legitimate business operations. The Paris-based Financial Action Task Force (FATF) has cited Canada’s reporting of illegal financial activity as weak, and its record of prosecutions and convictions as low.

Is Canada’s money laundering enforcement system really deficient?

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2015,
[field_writer2]

Your guide to understanding insurance coverage of damage from natural catastrophes including hail, flood, storms, wildfires, wind, lightning and earthquakes.

(2014,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY DR PAULA STEWART

“A Healthy and Active society is a Secure society.”
This outcome depends on the availability and support for training, education and physical fitness and the availability of proper employment, remuneration and accommodation for all.

(2014,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY ERIC SPENCE

The Aite Group has published a new research report on consumer fraud around the world. The two-part report questions confidence that consumers have in their financial institutions. The first report, which focuses on attitudes toward fraud, found that 23% of fraud victims changed financial institutions due to dissatisfaction after experiencing fraud.

Global trends

(2014,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

You’re a hard-working, tax-paying citizen who has never been in trouble with the law. You have always paid your bills, and used credit wisely. Moreover, your employment record is solid. As a result, you think you have a good credit rating. In fact, you don’t, but not because of anything you’ve done or neglected to do. A fabricated person, someone who has never existed except in government and credit bureau databases, has damaged your credit record without your knowledge.

(2011,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY DORON BERGERBEST-EILON
From Corporate Espionage

We know that attacks on critical infrastructures from criminal threats, corporate or industrial espionage and/or politically motivated sabotage, could threaten public safety, impact national security, or even create economic upheaval or environmental disaster. What we may not know is that a large percentage of critical infrastructures is actually privately owned and that private security forces are becoming the primary protectors of vital infrastructure.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As promised, this Summer 2010 edition deals with criminal financing and its effects on our security. To open, we called upon the expert perspectives of two former RCMP authorities well-versed in the subject of what we call ‘Dirty Money,’ for our first look on this specific topic.

(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY BANK OF CANADA

The Scenario
You walk into a store and hand the cashier a $20 bill in exchange for some groceries. The cashier takes your note and looks at it, and then tells you, 'Sorry, I'll need another $20. I think this one's a fake.'

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In a recent book entitled Tainted Money, author Avi Jorisch states: ‘As Washington reaches out to financial and foreign ministries around the globe, policymakers and laymen alike should be keenly aware of the financial dangers we will need to counter – whether they stem from rouge regimes like Iran and North Korea, the Osama bin Laden’s of the world, or criminals that are engaged in illicit activity.

Defending Against the Threat of
(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY NICK CATRANTZOS

Businesses of all types and sizes face the risk of insider fraud. This can be for corrupt personal gain, criminal or terrorist extortion or combinations of these. Responsible and successful organizations anticipate and take measures to mitigate such risk. For instance, one must realize that organized crime is first and foremost a business. As such, it has objectives, a management structure, financial performance goals, and metrics. Given this framework, anticipation and mitigation demand that you think like a predator.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY YIAGADEESEN SAMY [field_writer2]

Terrorism financing is a global problem requiring effective and coordinated solutions at the national, regional and multilateral levels. Fighting it, however, is costly; and measuring success is challenging.

One Last Thing
(2010,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

This issue of FrontLine Security provides a fascinating look into the full spectrum of financial issues in the security and crime investigation worlds. These subjects are frequently overlooked especially by our increasingly sound byte-driven media and political decision makers.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

In July, two rookie police officers of the Edmonton Police Service spotted a car with stolen license plates and pulled it over. As they searched the vehicle, the officers found 80 illegal credit cards as well as drugs and fake driver licenses. The occupants, a man and woman, were arrested.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY DAVID GEWIRTZ [field_writer2]

When it comes to protecting their identities, consumers are being threatened and pressured from all sides. It’s not just scam artists who are doing everything they can to separate you from your birth date and social security number, it’s often the online Web sites you choose to use, and – most troubling – those in authority as well.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ALAN BURKE [field_writer2]
Report from the UN Climate Change Conference

Climate change, resource depletion, health, security, economics, and politics are ­inextricably intertwined.


Air pollution in the Valley of Mexico. (Photo: C. Mcnaughton. U. of Hawaii)

Mark Camillo
(2007,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
Of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver

After meeting Mark Camillo at a recent Conference Board of Canada event covering the Transportation Security Challenges of the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, contacted him again in Washington for a more in-depth ­discussion of his insights on this topic. His ­extensive experience in these matters provides an objective view of the security challenges facing Canada, the Province of British Columbia, the City of Vancouver... and beyond.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

The protection of critical infrastructure is a key national security issue in a way that it has not been since the ‘snakes and ladders’ days of the late 1950s and the early Cold War civil defence program. Today’s threat has changed from Soviet rockets to various state and non-state actors armed with an equally wide variety of weapons. With this revolution in military affairs, has come a renewed interest in asymmetric confrontation of the Superpower and its NATO and Western Allies.

We're In This Together!
(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY STUART BRINDLEY

Professional emergency planners know that even the best plans depend on the extent to which critical infrastructure (CI) services are available to help responders mitigate and recover from the event. While local emergencies such as storms and accidents often disrupt CIs, work-arounds are often possible in short order, and additional materials and labour can be supplied from outside the affected area.