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(2016,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

The Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) recently sponsored a conference entitled "Are We Prepared?" April, 2016.

(2016,

Tanju Bilgiç, spokesperson for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Turkey, responds to the issue of the Open Skies treaty observation flight over Turkey that could not be conducted by the Russian Federation.

(2016,

 

After violent clashes in Ankara and Istanbul leave 161 dead, the government was able to quickly regain control and Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says plotters are being arrested and will be tried for treason. He publicly assured the nation that the government is in charge.

See timeline of events:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/16/turkey-coup-president-erdogan-says-military-elements-guilty-of-t/

(2016,

Backgrounder, as provided by the Embassy for Turkey in Canada:

"The developments unfolded in Turkey was a bloody coup attempt by a group of plotters in the military, linked to the Fethullah Gülen Terrorist Organization (FETÖ), to overthrow the democratically-elected Government and the constitutional order in Turkey.

(2016,

 

The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National of Defence, yesterday made the following statement about the truck attack that killed four Israeli solders in Jerusalem:

“As a partner, friend and ally of Israel, Canada fully supports the right of Israelis to live in peace and security, free from the threat of terrorism and incitement to violence.

“Canada condemns this terrorist attack that targeted Israel’s defence forces and expresses our deepest condolences to the victims and their families.”

(2015,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE
Minsk I, Minsk II, and the Security Council

With at least 5,820 dead and 15,270 wounded between April 2014 and March 2015, the War in the Donbass region of Ukraine has elevated geopolitical tensions between Russia and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to heights not seen since the Cold War. What began as the “Euromaidan” protests to oust then-President Viktor Yanukovych, promptly evolved into mass unrest and subsequently armed conflict between the post-revolution government in Kiev and pro-Russian insurgents in the eastern and southern regions of the country.

One Last Thing
(2014,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Like beauty, a covert security threat is often defined through the eye of the beholder. As such, it’s probably time to modernize what we consider as threats, and recognize that traditional statesponsored ‘espionage’, wherein military or political secrets are acquired, no longer uniquely defines the issue.


“Perceived increased corporate profit is not a substitute for public security.”

(2014,
issue 1)
BY AVI JORISCH

Human rights and liberal values are under threat in a small, little-known country most people would be hard-pressed to find on a map. Following the radical vision of Usama bin Laden and his followers, Brunei Darussalam became an Islamic state under strict Sharia law this past week, with punishments of death by stoning for ­adulterers and severing of limbs for thieves.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY DAVID GEWIRTZ

Highway 99, the Sea-to-Sky Highway, runs from ­Vancouver to Squamish along the Howe Sound on the way to Whistler, and is one of my favorite drives in all of North America. For 17 days this coming February, the Sea-to-Sky Highway is going to be swamped with millions of travelers traversing the 120 miles from Olympic venues in Vancouver to the slopes in Whistler.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ANGUS SMITH

Should we have been surprised by the terrorist siege of Mumbai? Probably not.
In a January 2005 article in The Atlantic, former White House security official Richard A. Clarke posited an “alternate future” for the post-9/11 decade. Clarke chronicled a series of terrorist attacks on the US homeland. The first wave consisted of simultaneous assaults on hotels and amusement parks; the second of a series of carefully planned shooting and bombing rampages in America’s largest shopping malls. In both ­scenarios, thousands died.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY TIM LYNCH

On November 27, 2008, while vacationing in Goa, India, I checked my email to discover a message from a friend in Toronto; he was inquiring if I was affected by events in Mumbai, 600 km up the road. Instinctively, I switched on CNN and immediately became aware that the city was under siege. Terrorists were killing innocent bystanders, destroying some of Mumbai’s landmarks, attacking Jewish ­residents and seeking out holders of British and American passports.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT HUEBERT

The Arctic is changing. Combined factors of climate change, resource development and changing geo-political concerns create an Arctic that is becoming more accessible – and thus coveted – by the outside world. The increased tempo of southern penetration of the north will provide opportunities for Canadians, but, at the same time, create difficult challenges to solve. The uncertainty of how this will manifest itself is perhaps the greatest difficulty now facing Government officials.