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(2017,
issue 2)
BY SEAN CANN-SHEPPARD [field_writer2]
For First Responders

The ever increasing threat of bio-terrorism has led to modernizing the way we prepare for a potential outbreak.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

(français ci-dessous)

Ottawa, ON - 125 public health care advocates from across Canada will be on Parliament Hill today to meet with over 100 Members of Parliament and call for the creation of a National Public Drug Plan.

Canada remains the only country in the world with a universal health care system that doesn't include prescription medication. This leaves 1 in 10 Canadians unable to afford their prescription drugs and almost 1 in 4 Canadians not taking their medications as prescribed.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

For many years, perhaps even for generations, female genital mutilation (FGM) in the U.S. has gone unreported, unsuspected and undetected because of the secretive trafficking of this barbaric practice.

Interview: Dr Jim Anderson
(2016,
issue 4)
[field_writer2]

Dr. Jim Anderson manages the Biological Warfare Threat Medical Countermeasures project at the Deptartment of National Defence (DND). He recently sat down with FrontLine editor Chris MacLean to discuss the challenges and implications of the biological threat and related preparedness requirements.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG RICHARDS, MBA, Ph.D, FCMC [field_writer2]

Many public safety organizations are keenly interested in deriving value from the massive amounts of data currently available to them. In situations were analytic staff are not available to work with this data, or when it makes sense to analyze data in several different ways, organizations are partnering with educational institutions.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

Civilian and military first responders from Simcoe County will converge on Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Borden on Sunday, May 1, 2016, to participate in a joint mass casualty exercise as part of Exercise STOP, DROP AND ROLL, a simulated response to an air show accident.

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) personnel from various CFB Borden units will join over 30 volunteer medical first responders from St. John Ambulance Barrie Simcoe Muskoka, County of Simcoe Paramedic Services, and Emergency Management Ontario staff to work through a simulated mass casualty scenario.

Managing global infectious disease threats
(2015,
issue 3)
BY DR SHANE RENWICK [field_writer2]

The health of a country’s animal population – including livestock, companion animals and wildlife – represents a critical link in supporting public health, healthy ecosystems, economic well-being and the safety and security of the population. Recent trends in globalization of trade and travel, environmental disturbances, political instability and climate change create opportunities for the emergence and spread of disease from animals to humans.

(2015,
[field_writer2]

(2009) Events have illustrated that both under-developed and developed countries can be overwhelmed by climatic events and that people living in Canada may be vulnerable to climate risks.

(2015,
[field_writer2]

(March 2009) AHRQ has developed more than 60 emergency preparedness-related studies, workshops, and conferences to help hospitals and health care systems prepare for public health emergencies. Many of these projects were made possible through collaboration with ASPR and other federal agencies. For more information, contact AHRQ Public Affairs: 301-427-1859 or 301-427-1855.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As I end my nine years as first Executive Editor of this fine magazine, and reflect upon the coming security challenges we face as Canadians in the next half decade and beyond, what has most struck me is the exponential increase in the number and complexity of security challenges and risks brought about by a myriad of important factors, the most prevalent of which is the dominating and increasing presence, influence and dependence upon the internet for everything in our much changed “every day lives”.

(2014,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY CAMERON HEKE

Those of us who live in Western Canada appreciate the traditional spirit of community service that permeates life in the Prairie provinces. One good example is the Shock and Trauma Air Rescue Service (STARS) organization, a non-profit helicopter air ambulance service that provides rapid and specialized emergency care and transportation for critically ill and injured patients. The service’s physicians, nurses, paramedics, and pilots work with a team of dedicated support staff and community partners to save lives.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Interview: Paramedics
(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

FrontLine’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, recently took the opportunity to speak with Dwayne Forsman, the Chief Administrative Officer of the Paramedic Association of Canada and Greg Forsyth, Superintendent Special operations of the Ottawa Paramedic Service some questions about the evolution of their profession over the last years and get their opinions on future general needs and responsibilities. Dwayne has been a Paramedic for 37 years, in both rural and urban environments.

(2013,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MARC DUPUIS

Did you know there are more volunteer firefighters in Canada than there are full time firefighters? More than 127,000
volunteer firefighters
provide services, largely in rural and remote areas, across Canada. Most urban and larger fire ­services began as volunteer services – as the population of the area grew, so did the fire services need, and many of those ­volunteers eventually became full-time members. Volunteer departments are an absolute necessity in areas that cannot afford to staff a full-time department.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Where does Canada stand on the topic of CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) threats – this less likely, most dangerous, and much discussed realm of security and safety threats to humanity? There are a myriad of international treaties and conventions on these matters.

(2012,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY ARTHUR HSIEH

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) defines a relatively young public safety profession in the United States, when compared to law enforcement and fire services. In a scant 50 years, the delivery of pre-hospital care and transportation of the sick and injured has evolved rapidly. This rapid development has challenges as well, frequently stemming from oft-ignored and underlying major structural concerns that have not been fully addressed.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

PREPARE & RESPOND
The worst floods in recorded history occurred in central China between July and November 1931, where as many as four million people died from drowning or related diseases such as cholera and typhus. Of the five deadliest floods on record, all have occurred in China. Most recently, in July 2012, torrential rains hit the central part of the country, causing in devastating floods and mudslides. At least 77 victims perished and millions were forced to evacuate their communities.

(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY PIERRE BILODEAU

View pdf

Enhancing Situational Awareness for Intelligent Emergency Management 
Awareness for Intelligent ­Emergency ManagementWhen a flood, tornado, chemical spill or other disaster occurs, it’s crucial to have a comprehensive view of where the incident happens and how it unfolds in order to deliver effective emergency services.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY JEFFREY KRAEGEL

View PDF

Health care facilities must be able to operate under a variety of potential emergency situations, both natural and man-made. This reality creates significant challenges for those who plan, design, build or renovate these facilities. Now, in a landmark standard recently published by CSA Group, best practices for addressing the complexities of health care facilities have been collected into a single, comprehensive document.

(2012,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY PIERRE BILODEAU

View PDF

During a disaster, decisions need to be made quickly - using complete, accurate and up-to-date information. This was the challenge faced by  Manitoba Health's Office of Disaster Management (ODM)during the spring of 2009, when the province experienced its second worst flood in over 100 years.

(2012,
[field_writer2]

(2011) Health care facilities need to develop an Emergency Water Supply Plan (EWSP) to prepare for, respond to, and recover from a total or partial interruption of the facilities' normal water supply because water supplies can, and do, fail. The objective of this Planning Guide is to help health care facilities develop a robust EWSP as part of its overall facility EOP and to meet the published standards set forth by the Joint Commission and the CMS. The guide is intended for use by any health care facility, regardless of size or patient capacity.

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

We are closing in on 15 years since the infamous Ice Storm crippled much of Eastern Ontario, Western ­Quebec, and the Northeastern States. Many remember the feeble briefings provided by authorities during the first few days – when power pole numbers, rather than geographical locations, were used to describe power outages to a troubled and doubly confused public. The worrying was shared by citizens unable to heat, cook, travel, wash or get medical treatment... or even get the flawed information. Are we better prepared now than we were then?

(2011,
issue 4)
BY FRAN HAWTHORNE [field_writer2]

The spraying of the deadly Ebola virus into a crowded subway, for example, could kill or injure hundreds of civilians. Or, as in the movies “Contagion” and “Outbreak,” entire towns might be quarantined and millions infected by a virulent, mutated bat virus or an Ebola-like virus, respectively.

(2011,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY NANCY BEARG

Our hearts go out to all these people, and we want to help. Often, we tweet $10 to the Red Cross or write a check to our favourite charity; this is valuable help and indicative of a community of caring coming together.


Red Cross volunteer out in New Jersey.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY PASCAL RODIER [field_writer2]

While the phrase “a once in a lifetime opportunity” often makes us think of a marketing scam or timeshare pressure sales, in this case it is very true. Emergency responders have a once in a lifetime opportunity to obtain 700 MHz broadband spectrum from Industry Canada. This will allow responders the needed spectrum to transfer mission critical data to and from scenes. Once this spectrum is gone it will be gone forever.

One Last Thing
(2010,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]
Time for a Lesson Learned Analysis

With the latest, but by no means last, chapter now concluded in the long running Omar Khadr saga following his guilty pleas and sentencing, it’s a good idea to reflect on how these events came about and why so we might be able to prevent them in the future.


U.S. Defence Press Operations, Pentagon, on Oct 31, 2010 shows a file photo of Omar Khadr constructing an IED.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY HAL NEWMAN

After the earthquake struck Haiti, my colleague, Andrew Fielden, and I worked with our partners at Igloo Software to put a wisdom-sharing community online. We called it The Crisis Kitchen because we believed the best way to share ideas, opinions and pragmatic pearls of wisdom is in a warm and inviting kitchen – real or metaphysical. Thus, I’ve spent the past couple of weeks working as a sous-chef in The Crisis Kitchen.

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

The flu season is upon us and the new ­vaccine is arriving as we go to press. We are grateful again to Dr. David Butler-Jones, Canada’s Chief Medical Officer, (whom we interviewed in our last edition), for his hard work and calm preparation. We also salute the public health workers across the country for their dedication and help in keeping the effects of this pandemic to a minimum in our communities.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr [field_writer2]

Darwinian principles today constitute the driving intellectual force behind the technology of a number of biotech companies, guiding a wide range of clinical applications that have already been developed or are on the drawing boards. On the forefront of this technology is Evolva, a Swiss company that seeks to use the ­principles of natural selection to propel their drug discovery program.

Dr David Butler-Jones
(2009,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In our Spring 2006 issue, Dr. David Butler-Jones, then recently appointed Public Health Officer of Canada, expressed to FrontLine Security, the goals and aspirations of his newly minted agency.  Since then, many public health issues have come to the fore, such as the ongoing H1N1 swine flu and the recent Listeriosis outbreak, to name but two.

(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY JENNIFER GIROUX

The 21st century has kicked off with a bang and opened the gates to an interconnected world where domestic and international borders are increasingly blurred. The last decade has witnessed the rise of transnational security threats posed by violent non-state actors, pandemics, climate change, ballooning economies, strains placed upon strategic, non-renewable energy resources, and significant technological advancements.

(2009,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

Vancouver will undoubtedly be swarming with people in February and March 2010. In addition to the 2.1 million existing residents in the metropolitan area, an additional 1.2 million athletes, media and spectators are expected to find their way to the lower mainland for the Winter Olympics and Paralympics.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(June 2009) Conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this report summarizes the relative importance of identified releases in terms of potential health risks at Los Alamos. The Los Alamos facility had a single mission – perfection of the design and manufacture of the first atomic bombs.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(February 2009) Although the consequences of a radiologic dispersal device are substantial, and the detonation of a modest-sized (10 kiloton) improvised nuclear device is catastrophic, it is both possible and imperative that a medical response be planned.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(April 2009) A Chatham House Briefing Paper by Cleo Paskal on environment-related disruptions to hydroelectric installations, offshore oil and gas production, pipelines, electrical transmission and nuclear power generation.

(2009,
[field_writer2] By Canadian Institutes of Health Research

As part of the Government of Canada's Avian Influenza and Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Strategy, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Infection and Immunity was charged with developing and supporting pandemic influenza preparedness research programs. The CIHR supports research intended to improve Canada's ability to prevent and/or respond to an influenza pandemic. This document presents the findings of a formative, midterm evaluation of the research initiative.

(2009,
[field_writer2] By the National Association of State EMS Officials

(July 2009) This Gap Analysis Template is intended for use by governments, educators and others as they begin to define the specific differences at the state and local level between current and future EMS education delivery. It is useful to consider gaps between an existing scope of practice compared to what may be implemented under the new SOP model and the Education Standards. This document can be used to begin identifying educational content that will need to be accounted for in the transition of existing EMS personnel as well as the delivery of future programs.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(2009) The World Health Organization has retained the use of a six-phased approach for easy incorporation of new recommendations and approaches into existing national preparedness and response plans.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ALAN BURKE [field_writer2]
Report from the UN Climate Change Conference

Climate change, resource depletion, health, security, economics, and politics are ­inextricably intertwined.


Air pollution in the Valley of Mexico. (Photo: C. Mcnaughton. U. of Hawaii)

Supt Michel Aubin
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In the Drug Situation Report – 2006, the RCMP presented for the first time the troubling fact that: “Within a two year period, Canada has reversed its Ecstasy supply pattern status from an import and ­consumer nation to a major ­production and export country.” ­Continued smuggling of the MDMA precursor chemical MDP2P from China to Canada in 2006 confirmed heightened domestic Ecstasy manufacture.

(2008,
issue 1)
[field_writer2]

History reminds us that the advent of freedom is regularly confronted by campaigns of terror. Today’s elevated levels of terrorism, in my view, are largely the result of the increasing availability of information to nations where information has long been censored or unavailable. This block of nations is a ­disparate agglomeration of states with serious internal struggles. Let’s examine some current terrorist trends and relate them to our own counter-­terrorism strategy in the War on Terror.

(2008,
[field_writer2] By the Transportation Research Board, Washington

(2008) Transportation and evacuation professionals are part of emergency management teams in some urban areas, but the potential for transportation in general and transit in particular to play a more significant role in emergency response and evacuation is far from being realized.

(2008,
[field_writer2] Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

(2009) Home Health Care During an Influenza Pandemic: Issues and Resources, a report identifying home health care as a critical component in providing care during a pandemic influenza event and offering resources to home health care providers and community planners to prepare for such an event, was released today by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) in collaboration with the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR).

(2008,
[field_writer2]

The Transportation Research Board of the National Academies just published this study on transit and its role in emergency evacuation. "The purpose of this study, which was requested by Congress and funded by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and the Transit Cooperative Research Program, is to evaluate the potential role of transit systems in accommodating the evacuation, egress, and ingress of people from or to critical locations in times of emergency.

(2007,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY RICHARD CULVER

The Olympic Games have become one of the world’s largest sporting events where visitors congregate from many different ­cultures and languages. For the host country, it is an opportunity to showcase itself internationally. All eyes will be on the scenery and the facilities, with even more scrutiny placed on how well the games are organized and executed.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Watching from the fenceline as Emirates Flight EK207 touches down on Toronto’s runway 24L at the end of its ­nonstop, 15-hour run from Dubai, aircraft enthusiast Andy Cline is thoroughly enjoying his hobby. As he closely observes the taxiing Boeing 777-300ER he (and about 150 other Airport Watch volunteers that regularly “spot” ­aircraft at Toronto-Pearson airport) is contributing to the safety and security of a major Canadian airport.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY TONY BAUMGARTNER

As the nation reassesses its response to large scale disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and its preparedness for the threat of H5N1 flu pandemic, planners must also begin thinking about and preparing for the inevitable – mass fatality management. A mass fatality incident is defined as “any incident where the number of fatalities is greater than normal local arrangements can manage.” Any plan for dealing with fatalities needs to be integrated with all aspects of the response to and recovery from such incidents.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY DOUG HARRISON [field_writer2]

Although it is difficult to actually pinpoint when emergency management emerged as a recognizable and distinct profession, it can safely be said that the idea or concept of practitioners schooled in risk management started to evolve in the 1990’s. By the early 2000’s, emergency management was both the buzzword and the business!

(2007,
issue 2)
BY MARK EGENER [field_writer2]

THE ALBERTA EXPERIENCE FOLLOWING THE AUGUST 2005 DERAILMENT AT LAKE WABAMUN
Regions and municipalities deal with crises on a somewhat regular basis and therfore tend to maintain their readiness levels, however, major disasters that call for special resources do not happen very often. The tendency then, especially as events fade into the past, is to let our preparedness guards down. This is perhaps more true at the federal and provincial/state ­levels that are further removed from first response demands.

(2006,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY JACK E. SMITH

A year ago, the Science and Technology Foresight Directorate of the Office of the National Science Advisor (ONSA) was asked to assist the new Public Security Technical Program (PSTP), a joint security technology initiative of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) and Defence Research & Development Canada (DRDC).

(2006,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

When the FedEx driver reported what he was carrying when he became involved in a car accident, people paid attention. His March 2, 2005 shipment included samples of anthrax, tuberculosis, E. coli, influenza and salmonella – all deadly viruses.

Interview: Dr David Butler-Jones
(2006,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Dr. David Butler-Jones has presided over Canadian and North American professional associations, and participates in international professional work sessions and has worked in many parts of Canada. As Canada’s Chief Public Health Officer, he heads the newly created Public Health Agency of Canada, providing leadership on the government’s efforts to protect the health and safety of all Canadians. After 18 months in this position, FrontLine Security had the opportunity to interview him about his responsibilities with the new Public Health Agency.

(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY DR UGIS BICKIS

Beware of an alarming illiteracy in Canada! This problem is evident among health officials tasked with protecting the public. It appears that they have not read, or possibly not understood, the science – we know they have disregarded it. Their lack of understanding is egregious. They also have not called upon the cadre of professionals who are well versed in the science and art of protecting people from disease, particularly airborne disease.

(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY JAY N. ROSENBLATT

GOOD BUSINESS SENSE
Greg Pellegrino, Global Managing Director, Public Sector, at Deloitte Research, in a Study entitled: “Prospering in the Secure Economy” explains the new secure economy, and the opportunity for enhancing business value by responding through investment in responsible approaches to security.

(2006,
[field_writer2]

(November 2006) This primer is intended to serve as a quick reference in the event of a radiation disaster. It summarizes information on preparing for a radiation emergency, handling contaminated persons, dose assessment and radiation exposure health effects. It also includes information on radiological findings related to agents of biological and chemical terrorism because radiologists may be involved in the diagnosis of conditions associated with such exposures.

(2001,
[field_writer2]

(March 2001) The MHMI series is a three volume set of pdfs (with a video) comprised of recommendations for on-scene (prehospital), and hospital medical management of patients exposed during a hazardous materials incident. Vol I: Emergency Medical Services; Vol II: Hospital Emergency Departments; Vol III: Medical Management Guidelines.The MHMI series is a three volume set of pdfs (with a video) comprised of recommendations for on-scene (prehospital), and hospital medical management of patients exposed during a hazardous materials incident.