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(2017,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG FYFFE [field_writer2]

The Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS) recently held a Symposium entitled “The Cyber Challenge.” Although the speakers focused on the national and international, and non-criminal aspects of the threat, the implications for those on the front lines of public safety are unmistakable.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]
– the Public Safety Connection

Cyber is a Team Game. Cyber is pervasive. It is a common thread that runs throughout the national security portfolio, defence & foreign policy, public safety’s security strategy, and critical infrastructure protection mandates.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY WARREN TKACHUK [field_writer2]

According to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, in its 2007 Fire Prevention in Aboriginal Communities report: “Fire incidence rates for First Nations are 2.4 times higher than for the rest of Canada. First Nations residents are also 10 times more likely to die in a house fire. The victims are often young children.”

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

By Eric Baculinao, NBC News
 
China has unveiled a proposal for a $50 trillion global electricity network that would help fight pollution and the effects of climate change.

The plan envisions linking existing and future solar farms, wind turbines and electricity plants in Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas, according to the head of State Grid Corporation of China.

(2016,
[field_writer2]
Lessons from the Fort McMurray blaze
(2015,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE [field_writer2]


Canadians should take warning from the events in Paris on 13 November. Too often, Canadians dismiss terrorist threats, warnings and close calls with the usual attitude that “Canada is not important enough to attract terrorism,” or that “it can’t happen here.” That kind of thinking is dangerous. It can happen here, and it has happened here.

(2015,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY ETTORE CONTESTABILE

Efforts in infrastructure protection in Canada existed to different degrees before the Sept 11 tragedies, but this event brought to the forefront the need to better define critical infrastructure.

Critical Infrastructure
(2015,
issue 2)
BY PHILIP J. BOYLE [field_writer2]

Despite its ambitious mission, will the revived National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure be able to sidestep long-standing problems associated with private sector ownership of critical infrastructure and the limits of emergency management in a federal system that may undermine it’s effectiveness while also raising fresh questions regarding the strategic concept of resilience?

(2015,
issue 2)
BY MARTIN LISIUS [field_writer2]

My journey with storms began some 40 years ago, and I have learned many lessons that can help others protect themselves, their friends, and their families from the hazards of severe weather.

Editor's Corner
(2015,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]
A Request to FrontLine Readers

It has been an interesting first few months for me as the new editor of Frontline Safety and Security. I have spent the last few months meeting with organizations tasked with, or interested in, keeping the public safe – let’s call them partners in safety and security. These have included various intelligence organizations, associations, first responders, and Universities.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As we reflect upon the broad  perspectives offered in this of FrontLine Security, particularly their varied input into the ­vulnerabilities of the many infrastructures upon which modern life, its governance and economies, rely – we are struck by the growing potential and increasing numbers of attacks upon their cyber component, the very life blood of much of our critical infrastructure. This is not just occurring in the western world – it is indeed global, in its targets, victims and perpetrators.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]

“The nature of strategy is paradoxical and does not follow a linear pattern.”
– Edward N. Luttwak

(2014,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY NATHANIEL BOWLER
Only as Strong as Our Weakest Link

The British Virgin Islands (BVI) House of Assembly passed the Computer Misuse and Cybercrime Act on 13 March 2014. This Bill stiffens penalties for crimes related to both the ­distribution of child pornography and also the publication of confidential data. The Bill was deemed necessary after an embarrassing incident last year in which 2.5 million confidential files were leaked from two national trust companies.

Editor's Corner
(2014,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
A Key Strategic Goal

This edition of Frontline Security is dedicated primarily to the international impact of cyber attacks upon the reliability and security of all critical infrastructure ­systems. You will be reminded that tremendous risks are being taken in this field, and that we face great complexity in effectively mitigating these, be they in public, private or joint sectors. In my own examination of present government policy and public-private coordination, I have found the measures wanting, and the pace of adjustments glacial, as the threats evolve at jet speed. 

(2014,
[field_writer2] By Natural Resources Canada

Our understanding of climate change impacts and adaptation in Canada has increased, both as a result of new research and through practical experience. Led by Natural Resources Canada, the development of this report involved over 90 authors and 115 expert reviewers, and synthesized over 1500 recent publications.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Q1: Following the severe flooding in Southern Alberta in June, you have been appointed by the Alberta Government as the Chief Assistant Deputy Minister for the Alberta Flood Recovery Task Force. What preparations had been in place for mitigating such an event, and what improvements are you now working on?

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]

Newspapers were full with stories of how the RCMP, supported by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), had just prevented a “terrorist attack” at the BC Legislature on July 1st (Canada Day) 2013. These unfolding events provided a revealing background to my inquiries about Canada’s maritime security infrastructure, and were relevant to my inquiries on how culturally different federal departments work together efficiently.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]
Surveillance, Censorship, Intolerance and Violence

Implications for privacy at the Sochi Olympics
Athletes train their entire lives to compete in their sport at the Olympics. But in Sochi, our athletes, their coaches, sports organization representatives, spectators and dignitaries may find themselves competing in a different sort of games… that have already begun (without an opening ceremony).

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE [field_writer2]

The warning was unequivocal: Canadians must confront the steadily increasing numbers of technological traps, trip-wires and hazards that await the unprepared, the careless and the unaware.

In October, Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) president Tim Page opened SecureTech 2013, by describing Canada’s security environment. “Serious risks to pubic safety, threats to our eco systems, traditional way of life and national security challenges abound, and are growing in complexity, impact and cost.”

(2013,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY COLIN ROBERTSON

Margaret Atwood once remarked that if the national mental illness of the United States is megalomania, that of Canada is paranoid schizophrenia.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

View PDF

In April 2009, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported that computer hackers thought to be Chinese or Russian had breached a key computer network of U.K. defence giant BAE Systems in 2007 and 2008 and stolen several terabytes of data related to the United States' F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). BAE has been a major industrial partner on the $382-billion aerospace program during the past eight years. Not surprisingly, U.S. officials downplayed the story.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

View PDF

As this issue of FrontLine Security forcefully demonstrates, when it comes to security related matters, co-ordination of activities is an essential element of success. This is so because the subject matter frequently involves both the private and public sector, all three levels of government and multiple inter-connected infrastructures or activities.

Gina Wilson
(2011,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE [field_writer2]

ICE could be the Inescapable Canadian Element, one that demands cooperation for survival. ICE could also be an Implacable ­Climatic Experience, which presents formidable challenges to governments, industry and individuals – as demonstrated by the 1998 ice storm that essentially shut down major parts of Eastern Canada and the ­northeastern United States.

(2011,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY DORON BERGERBEST-EILON
From Corporate Espionage

We know that attacks on critical infrastructures from criminal threats, corporate or industrial espionage and/or politically motivated sabotage, could threaten public safety, impact national security, or even create economic upheaval or environmental disaster. What we may not know is that a large percentage of critical infrastructures is actually privately owned and that private security forces are becoming the primary protectors of vital infrastructure.

(2011,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY JEAN LOUP Le ROUX

Canada and the United Kingdom both enforce similar export regulations through the Controlled Goods Directorate (CGD) and the Export Control Organisation (ECO). Domestic laws restricting exports are known as “Export Control” (EC). A broad range of commercial goods, including ­certain off-the-shelf valves, gauges, electronics, computers, optics, ­sensors, software, and other items of a seemingly commercial nature are EC-regulated. Many of these items do not have to be solely of U.S. origin to be subject to ITAR/EC.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

With a long history of defence trade show success with behind it, the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) was challenged with how to do the same for the security industry. CANSEC has rapidly grown over the years to be the largest defence trade show in Canada.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2] and DAVID MUGRIDGE

With globalization, many national economies, including Canada’s, are dependent on global trade – and maritime transportation is the strongest link in the international supply chain. International shipping has become a fundamental contributor and facilitator of economic growth; but it is increasingly susceptible to events that could result in the full or partial closure of ports or associated critical infrastructure.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY TIM DUNNE [field_writer2]

The marine industry is an essential lifeline for so many of our daily needs. Annually, Canada’s commercial marine industry ­generates $10 billion in economic activity and $117 billion in international trade. It is responsible for 100,000 jobs that manage and move the 456 million tonnes of cargo annually.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

After more than 12 years in operation, Airport Watch has become a North American-wide concept. Its early beginnings date back to 1999 when a partnership was formed at the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport between members of the Ottawa Police Service, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the airport authority, and a newly formed group of aircraft enthusiasts turned citizen volunteers.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY PASCAL RODIER [field_writer2]

While the phrase “a once in a lifetime opportunity” often makes us think of a marketing scam or timeshare pressure sales, in this case it is very true. Emergency responders have a once in a lifetime opportunity to obtain 700 MHz broadband spectrum from Industry Canada. This will allow responders the needed spectrum to transfer mission critical data to and from scenes. Once this spectrum is gone it will be gone forever.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

“There is a new world emerging above the Arctic Circle. It is this world, a new world for all the peoples of the Arctic regions that we in Canada are working to build”
– Stephen Harper, August 2008, Inuvik, NWT

(2011,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY PAUL KOVACS

Some day a large earthquake will strike Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa or another large urban centre in Canada. Such an event has the potential to cause loss of life, property damage and economic disruption unprecedented for Canada. The tragic and contrasting experiences last year in Haiti and Chile show that appropriate investments in preparedness and resilience can help prevent future earthquakes from becoming disasters.

One Last Thing
(2011,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

As this issue of FrontLine Security forcefully demonstrates, when it comes to security related matters, coordination of activities is an essential element of success. This is so because the subject matter involved frequently involves both the private and public sector, all three levels of government and multiple inter-connected infrastructures or activities. Put differently, notwithstanding the wishes of some for a single, all powerful, government entity that is in charge of everything, that’s not reality – nor, thankfully, is it ever going to be.

(2011,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY PTSC-ONLINE

PTSC-Online is Canada’s virtual on line community for emergency manage­ment, business continuity and critical infrastructure protection professionals. It is also a source of emergency management related information for the Canadian public. This report underlines key points of its operation as a test project since mid-year 2010. It also highlights the ­benefits of using and supporting PTSC-Online, identifies the financial needs for its continued operation, and offers options for continued financial support.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

At the beginning of 2010, the government had just published its Critical Infrastructure Strategy and Action Plan and published this October another major ­document, its Cyber Security Strategy. Mr Justice Major revealed the findings of his inquiry on the Air India intelligence and other law enforcement shortcomings. Canada had the Olympics, the G8 and G20 to secure in an ever more visibly terror-laden world.

Vic Toews
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

This year has been very productive at the Department of Public Safety, from both the legislative and policy implementation points of view. As well, there has been a greater degree of coordination and integration with our U.S. neighbour in many security domains.


Minister Vic Toews delivers a speech at the CentrePort Construction milestones event in Winnipeg, June 18, 2010.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY SEAN A. TRACEY [field_writer2]

When considering protection of key infrastructure, big companies come easily to mind. The energy grid, telecommunications networks, and the big banks are all a part of Canada’s Critical Infrastructure ­Protection (CIP) strategy. The fact is, however, that smaller companies can contribute enormously to the ­necessary resiliency of this very same CIP strategy.

(2010,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY WILLIAM F. MacKAY
From a Vision to Reality

A few months ago, the concept of a nationwide Canadian emergency management network was just that – a concept, a dream. Today, ­Partnerships Towards Safer Communities Online (PTSC-Online) is a reality. Its growing membership has a good grasp on current issues facing Canadian emergency managers and are deriving value from their participation in this program.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY TYSON MACAULAY [field_writer2]
Metrics-Based Assessment and Policy Indications

Most research into Critical Infrastructure Interdepen­dency (CII) is based upon ad hoc observations, anecdotes and partial incident-accounts which describe some but not all Critical Infrastructure (CI) sectors and their conditions after the incident. ­Metrics-based systems for understanding, mapping and modeling of CII have been evolving slowly.  

(2010,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] A SOLUTIONS SHOWCASE

In today’s electronic world, criminals routinely use sophisticated means to steal personal identity data from both public and private organizations. As the stability of identification credentials is breached, one response is to turn to the collection of biometrics. Biometric identity solutions are emerging on a global scale as nations and industry recognize the integral role it will play in non-transferable, unique identification.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As promised, this Summer 2010 edition deals with criminal financing and its effects on our security. To open, we called upon the expert perspectives of two former RCMP authorities well-versed in the subject of what we call ‘Dirty Money,’ for our first look on this specific topic.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Since that time, then Senator has indeed become President Obama and has launched (in March) the National Cybersecurity Initiative with a $40 billion budget.

William J. Lynn III
Deputy Director of Defense

"The reality is that we cannot defend our networks by ourselves. We need a shared defense.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2] and DR RAFAL ROHOZINSKI

Espionage has been described as “the second oldest profession, and just as honourable as the first.” The practice of intercepting wireless signals existed at the time of the Russo-Japanese War of 1904. The disciplines of electronic warfare (EW) and signals intelligence (SIGINT) evolved over the years. The doctrine of Information Warfare (IW) reached its peak in 1994, and cyber espionage then emerged in nation states. China and Russia were quick to add the concepts to their arsenal, which evolved throughout the 20th century into “the last, best-kept secret of the state.”

Lt-General Michael Jeffery
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
Canada Must Face the Potential for Domestic and Global Threats!

Brian Rexrod
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Q:How much damage can be mitigated if major companies such as Microsoft, AT&T, or, in Canada, Rogers, Bell and Telus provide the security before it reaches the user as your Chief of Security suggested last year?

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY HAL NEWMAN

After the earthquake struck Haiti, my colleague, Andrew Fielden, and I worked with our partners at Igloo Software to put a wisdom-sharing community online. We called it The Crisis Kitchen because we believed the best way to share ideas, opinions and pragmatic pearls of wisdom is in a warm and inviting kitchen – real or metaphysical. Thus, I’ve spent the past couple of weeks working as a sous-chef in The Crisis Kitchen.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

To ensure common objectives such as public safety and security stay at the forefront of an ever-changing global environment, all moving parts of a nation’s security force need to be working in sync and constantly communicating. This, however, is much easier said than done.
 

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

We need a National Security Policy with teeth, now. Particularly its Emergency ­Preparedness and Critical Infrastructure ­Protection elements, and one which allies, neighbours, businesses, provinces and municipalities can, with confidence, know is indeed protecting our citizens and resources reliably… as most, incorrectly, expect we now do.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2] and DOUG HALES

In a way, the “Brampton 18” is also an indicator of the change we have seen since 9/11. In one corner, we have seen civil liberties be reaffirmed with the demise of the vague and damaging security certificate; in the other corner we see the Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Anti-Terrorism Act in triumph with the pleas of guilty to terrorism charges that three of the 18 have made.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr [field_writer2]

What happens when one or more of the complex systems that keep our civilization running break down? As unpleasant as it is to contemplate, this question dominates the thinking of Dr. Wolfgang Kröger, ­Professor and Director of the Laboratory for Safety Analysis of ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology).

(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LAUREN WALTON

An Awakening

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Much has been occurring in the world of FrontLine Security this spring… some fresh, some less. We are pleased that the federal government has awakened to the seriousness and broad scope of Cyber Security threats and is preparing a policy (hopefully P-3) on this matter, as recently announced by Minister Peter Van Loan. We wish him well with this, and trust that it won’t fall into the “never-ending-meeting-resolve-nothing” route of the “Working Towards” strategy on Critical Infrastructure Security released last year.

(2009,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

Vancouver will undoubtedly be swarming with people in February and March 2010. In addition to the 2.1 million existing residents in the metropolitan area, an additional 1.2 million athletes, media and spectators are expected to find their way to the lower mainland for the Winter Olympics and Paralympics.

(2009,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY FRONTLINE STAFF

In the wake of recent cyber security threats such as the Conficker virus scare and reports that the U.S. electrical grid was penetrated by cyber spies earlier this month, a former top U.S. cybersecurity official is sending out a reminder that no one is protected in this new, heavily-interconnected world, and that the best defense to the ever-increasing threat of cyber attack is a comprehensive response plan.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(May 2009) The global LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) shipping, handling and storage infrastructure is extremely vulnerable to a terrorist attack which, if successful, could have catastrophic results – both in terms of lives lost and economic impact. Securing this infrastructure is quickly becoming a top national security priority.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(April 2009) A Chatham House Briefing Paper by Cleo Paskal on environment-related disruptions to hydroelectric installations, offshore oil and gas production, pipelines, electrical transmission and nuclear power generation.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Putting this Border Security edition together, in the wake of the world-wide recession, increased tension in the Middle East, and much turbulence in both Canada and the U.S. over government regimes, was indeed a wonderfully stimulating challenge. Yet, it turns out, the real challenge remains to secure our borders without isolating ourselves (which would reduce our chances of mutual prosperity)… the same issue we have tackled for over 50 years.

(2008,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY MIKE TODDINGTON

As identified by the Canada Council, competing ports in the U.S. have a much better foundation under which to work. American ports are publicly owned, and port officials are elected locally, therefore, port developments in the local public interest receive grants derived from local taxation. Alternatively, limited human and financial resources continue to present a significant disadvantage for Canadian ports.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY JILL OLEN [field_writer2]

Natural and man-made disasters don’t recognize political boundaries; the path of a radiological plume will not respect a port of entry. Border communities share many of the same concerns, but there are also some unique conditions that require innovative initiatives from multiple partners. Increased security requirements have heightened ­tensions at the borders that prior to 9/11/01 were easily resolved with local cooperation.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As our renewed government faces new and major economic readjustments on a global scale, I am pleased to present this issue on Cyber Security.  


Constable Les Gramantik, of the Firearms Training Unit, demonstrates the new rifle power. (Photo courtesy of the Calgary Police Service)

(2008,
issue 3)
BY BRIAN PHILLIPS [field_writer2]

So often, for those of us who deal daily with the vulnerability of our critical infrastructures, what we do for a living feels like selling insurance to people who are just trying to survive day to day.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

While preparing for this edition, I wanted to improve my own knowledge of cyber security. In my search, I discovered some rather interesting facts and some downright scary issues. As is usual in many matters related to security, I found the usual industry trick, which is to scare the customer, define the problem and sell your product to avoid it, and, eventually, improve upon this protection with even more costly technical fixes.

(2008,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY JOHN BANTA

Is it possible for an unincorporated hamlet with a population of about 250 to establish and maintain a full-fledged volunteer fire department? In 1979, a group of forward thinking citizens in Fauquier, BC thought so, and the seed they planted 30 years ago has gone on to bear plentiful fruit.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Spring issue on Terrorism and Critical Infrastructure Protection ­generated much interest and comment. As we embark on the key trial of Momin Khawaja, the first Canadian-born to be charged under the new ­terrorist legislation, the issues brought up in our last edition by Howie Marsh and Tom Quiggin will surely resonate in the minds of our readers.

(2008,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY DR SHAHRZAD RAHBAR
Critical Infrastructure Security

Today, the threats to industry vary from those of a decade ago. The natural gas ­distribution industry has responded to the challenge – we have improved our understanding of new threats; and we have taken steps to ensure the continued reliability of the critical infrastructure that delivers 24% of Canada’s end-use energy to Canadian industry, businesses and homes, and exports half of our production over 3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas to the U.S.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY TYSON MACAULAY [field_writer2]

Novice SCUBA divers first learn to find “up”– where the­ ­surface and safety lie, basically the direction of ­bubbles – knowing “up” enables them to maintain normal orientation and control. While this may seem obvious and intuitive, it is not. When you are 60 feet down (3 atmospheres) and lose visibility and orientation, it is easy to panic and make fatally bad decisions.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY WAYNE L. PICKERING [field_writer2] and PETER JOHNSTON

Introduction
Critical Infrastructure consists of those ­physical and information technology facilities, networks, services and assets which, if disrupted or  destroyed, would have a serious impact on the health, safety, security or economic well-being of Canadians or the effective functioning of government.  

(2008,
issue 2)
BY ERNEST MACGILLIVRAY [field_writer2]

New Brunswick is a relatively small jurisdiction, the third smallest in Canada, with a population of just 750,000. The lead provincial agency for emergency management is the New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization (NB-EMO), with a permanent staff of nine people. On reflection, the province performed quite well during this year’s flood – far better than during a similar flood in 2005. We examine some of the interesting reasons why, and explain how the province is incorporating recent lessons learned to improve its emergency program for the future..

(2008,
issue 2)
[field_writer2]

Today, mobile field camps are versatile, deployable facilities for both civil and military operations. After a short assembly time, they provide comfortable living and working conditions designed to ease some of the strain of an extended period of deployment. Field camps with sufficient infrastructure can provide the basis for continuous ­operational readiness, sustainability and motivation.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]

In their November 2007 report entitled, A Resilient Canada: Governance for National Security and Public Safety, by Trevor Munn-Venn and Andrew Archibald, the Conference Board of Canada has produced an insightful analysis of how Canadians formulate and implement governance in their national security and public safety ­organizations. Interestingly, after interviewing public and private sector leaders and experts in this subject area, the Board found that the greatest threat to national security perceived by these experts is “a lack of clarity around governance.”

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our main theme for this edition is on Critical Infrastructure Protection. The protection of these essential assets (80% of which are privately owned) is a major government responsibility that requires proper legislation and ­coordination. It is saddening how little progress and attention seems to have been brought to this real safety concern for all Canadians. The pleas go ­unanswered, but we continue – it is that important!

(2008,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY STUART BRINDLEY
Do Government and Critial Infrastructure Sectors Communicate?

In the Spring 2007 edition of FrontLine Security, I described the work underway to develop ­voluntary partnerships between those who own and operate our critical infrastructures and their U.S. and Canadian governments. These partnerships will help establish trusted ­mechanisms to share information between governments and the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors; information that is essential to address the threats and hazards that could disrupt the reliable delivery of basic services such as telecommunications, electricity, water, fuel, and natural gas.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]

Proactive Cyber Defence doctrine compels an ­enterprise to act by interdicting and disrupting an attack preemptively in self-defence to oppose an attack against their computer infrastructure.

(2008,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY GIULIO MAFFINI

It’s on CNN
Watching a recent CNN video of a staged Cyber attack showing a large turbine generator self destructing, may have caused some to dismiss the story as yet another attempt to sensationalize and shock an increasingly desensitized TV audience. As the report unfolds, however, one learns that the video was created by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in a training experiment, code named Aurora. It’s time to pay closer attention.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In our winter issue, we have chosen to examine security for the upcoming 2010 Winter Olympics and have a first glance at how preparations are ­progressing since the official unveiling in September 2006 in Whistler.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Few post 9/11 security challenges are as daunting as the one facing Canada when it considers what is generically described as maritime security. The sheer size of the Canadian maritime environment is mind numbing. The coastline alone, including Newfoundland and PEI, is almost 72,000 kilometers long with frontage on the Arctic, Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Add in the hundreds of islands and that coastline more than triples.

Public and Private Information Sharing
(2007,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY JIM ROBBINS

Motivated partially by self-preservation, but also by a “carrot & stick” combination of grants and threats of litigation – the public and private sector “information sharing and analysis” that occurred prior to Y2K was unprecedented.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY SUNIL RAM [field_writer2]

In the wake of independence in 1962, Algeria came under the growing authoritarian governance of the socialist National Liberation Front (FLN). Tensions exploded in 1988 when a series of youth riots, which left over 500 dead, set off a new Islamic revolt in Algeria. The government subsequently acquiesced to the first multiparty election, however, when the Islamic Salvation Front (Front Islamique du Salut – FIS) won a round of parliamentary elections for local councils in 1990, the FLN changed the electoral laws so it could win in the future.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY DOUG HARRISON [field_writer2]

Although it is difficult to actually pinpoint when emergency management emerged as a recognizable and distinct profession, it can safely be said that the idea or concept of practitioners schooled in risk management started to evolve in the 1990’s. By the early 2000’s, emergency management was both the buzzword and the business!

One Last Thing
(2007,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

As this issue of FrontLine Security illustrates, the marine component of domestic security measures has never been as important for Canada as it is today. The reasons for this is, of course, are fairly obvious.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY MARK EGENER [field_writer2]

THE ALBERTA EXPERIENCE FOLLOWING THE AUGUST 2005 DERAILMENT AT LAKE WABAMUN
Regions and municipalities deal with crises on a somewhat regular basis and therfore tend to maintain their readiness levels, however, major disasters that call for special resources do not happen very often. The tendency then, especially as events fade into the past, is to let our preparedness guards down. This is perhaps more true at the federal and provincial/state ­levels that are further removed from first response demands.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY JAY C. HOPE [field_writer2]
Practical Advice from Ontario’s Commissioner of Community Safety

Natural disasters can strike with ­little or no notice, causing large numbers of casualties and devastating local infrastructure. Impacts may include widespread power outages, road closures that block emergency response efforts, building collapses and structure fires. As the Com­missioner of Community Safety for Ontario and a for­mer Deputy Com­missioner of the Ontario Provincial Police, I know that within moments of a natural disaster striking, response resources and management systems can be stressed to the limit.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
Idassa 2007 Croatia

IDASSA 2007 is the second Natural Disaster exercise that the Republic of Croatia, in cooperation with NATO’s Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coord­ina­tion Centre (EADRCC), has organized on its territory. The majority of Croatian work for the exercise was organized and conducted by the National Protection and Reserve Directorate.


Croatioan Civil Protection Team on IDASSA exercise. (Photo: Dino Stanin)

(2007,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY TANYA ELLIOT

Across the world and across the street, on the battlefield or at the scene of disaster, where there are signs of trouble you will see one of the most recognized symbols in the world: the Red Cross. With a legislated role as “auxiliary to the public authorities,” in addition to its non-profit status, humanitarian mission, volunteer-driven structure, and long history in disaster management, the Red Cross has a unique vantage point to gain knowledge from lessons learned and promote best practices in disaster management for the volunteer, non-profit sector.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY GORDON McBEAN [field_writer2]

Weather-related hazardous events have always affected responders but the frequency of these natural ­disasters has been increasing – from 2-4 per year in earlier decades to about 12 per year in the last decade (with considerable year-to-year variability).


May 2007 - Lake City, Florida. The Florida Bugaboo Fire rages out of control as firefighters wait for a helicopter to bring a load of water. (Photo: Mark Wolfe/FEMA)

(2007,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Would Canada be able to effectively respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction attack? A cooperative initiative aimed at providing critical equipment and training to First Responders, is needed to enable them to safely intervene in Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) incidents. The solution – let’s call it a First Responder Rebate Program (FRRP) – would provide the equipment and training necessary for effective and efficient First Responder (FR) rescue operations.

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our winter Borders and Biometrics edition was very timely.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

The protection of critical infrastructure is a key national security issue in a way that it has not been since the ‘snakes and ladders’ days of the late 1950s and the early Cold War civil defence program. Today’s threat has changed from Soviet rockets to various state and non-state actors armed with an equally wide variety of weapons. With this revolution in military affairs, has come a renewed interest in asymmetric confrontation of the Superpower and its NATO and Western Allies.

We're In This Together!
(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY STUART BRINDLEY

Professional emergency planners know that even the best plans depend on the extent to which critical infrastructure (CI) services are available to help responders mitigate and recover from the event. While local emergencies such as storms and accidents often disrupt CIs, work-arounds are often possible in short order, and additional materials and labour can be supplied from outside the affected area.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY PHILIP DAWE and KEN MARSHALL

Many threats and hazards have the potential to undermine the security and safety of Canadians. These threats and hazards can be man-made, such as acts of terrorism, or they can be natural, such as floods, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The ability of the public safety and security community to manage these emergencies and disasters can be aided by information technology. In particular, ‘geospatial’ information technology (technology that ties information to a location – a mapping system) is proving increasingly useful to emergency managers.

Ron Moran
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In 2004, the Martin government formed the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) by moving parts of the former Customs and Revenue Agency and parts of Immigration into this entity as a Separate Operating Agency under Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. In August 2006 in Vancouver, Prime Minister Harper reiterated his government’s commitment to reinforce the security along our border with the United States, and in recent months both U.S.

(2006,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY JACK E. SMITH

A year ago, the Science and Technology Foresight Directorate of the Office of the National Science Advisor (ONSA) was asked to assist the new Public Security Technical Program (PSTP), a joint security technology initiative of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) and Defence Research & Development Canada (DRDC).

(2006,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Few would argue that 9/11 changed the world in fundamental ways. The impact in Canada was almost as profound as in the U.S. and the response by governments here and south of here was laudable – lots of scurrying round with new anti-terrorism committees, intergovernmental talks, and cross ­border treaties.

One Last Thing
(2006,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

He has seven separate aliases (that we know of), and is believed to possess American, Guyanese, Trinidadian and Canadian passports as well as pilot training. He is an engineering graduate that the FBI reports attended Ontario’s McMaster University (where he sought to acquire nuclear material) as well as Al Qaeda training camps before 9/11. He speaks English flawlessly having been raised in New York and Florida where his associates included Jose Padilla and Mohammed Atta.

(2006,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY IAN BAYNE

Emergency management is a shared responsibility among all levels of government and all stakeholders. The likelihood of major incidents and the potential consequences are increasing as population density increases, the infrastructure ages, and society’s dependence on technology, information and just-in-time supply chain management grows. This dynamic management environment is becoming more uncertain as people begin to understand that they can no longer rely on historic control models.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]

Canadians have been forced to learn a great deal about National Security in the four years since 9/11. However, it is only since the London bombings in 2005, and the 2006 wartime deaths of a Canadian diplomat and Canadian soldiers by the al Qaeda-affiliated Taliban in Afghanistan, that we have collectively (and reluctantly) ventured into the macabre risk-management equation of security against global militant Jihadist terrorism.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]

When Securing an Open Society: Canada’s National Security Policy was promulgated in April 2004, the authors billed it as a “strategic framework and action plan.” It is not a national security strategy. In fact, it would seem that the Canadian government did not feel an urgent need for a national security strategy. Rather, they often seemed to leave this sort of thinking to the U.S. government in the context of North American security strategy.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD COHEN [field_writer2]
Government can't do it alone

After 9/11, governments around the globe sprang to respond to the new threat. In Canada, the federal government implemented major structural changes and ­allocated billions of dollars to strengthen National Security and Public Safety. As well, recent natural catastrophes and ­public health scares have reminded us that terrorism is not the only danger we face. Although most governments have reacted energetically to these new challenges, the rest of society, including the business community, have for the most part, been sitting on the sidelines.