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(2017,
issue 1)
BY MARTHA J. LAGUARDIA-KOTITE
Newest flagships enhance National Security

It is July 2013 and U.S. Coast Guard deck hands take in the mooring lines aboard Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a Legend-class National Security Cutter. Stratton slowly drifts away from the San Diego pier, sounding three short blasts to alert nearby maritime traffic that the 418-foot steel vessel was backing out. The engines shift, increasing speed ahead, and USCGC Stratton is outbound for sea.

(2017,

(français ci-dessous)
 
Now is your chance to recognize someone’s selfless and amazing devotion to Veterans!

Ottawa, ON - February 6, 2017

(2016,
issue 4)
PAUL ROMEO

OFFICER TRAINING

(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG RICHARDS, MBA, Ph.D, FCMC

Many public safety organizations are keenly interested in deriving value from the massive amounts of data currently available to them. In situations were analytic staff are not available to work with this data, or when it makes sense to analyze data in several different ways, organizations are partnering with educational institutions.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

Police analytics can be extremely valuable in the fight against terrorism and crime. By identifying which events are most likely to escalate, predictive techniques can both improve prevention capability and control costs by deploying officers before escalation and where they are needed most.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY FRONTLINE STAFF
Closing the Public Safety and Security Technology Gap

As the complexity and reach of global threats continues to increase, the demands on public safety and first responders are also growing.
Recent reports – including studies by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and public safety organizations around the world – have confirmed that first responders want timelier mission-critical information to decrease response times and detect and mitigate threats before they happen. Interestingly, this is similar to what militaries around the world need for the battlefield.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

Providing information that will help our frontline responders keep us safer and more secure is the overriding objective of FrontLine Safety and Security. To this end, I am always on the lookout for ideas, research, and other materials that can be presented to our readers. In our Winter edition of the magazine, we will be focusing on police analytics.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY VALARIE FINDLAY

The boiling anger in the U.S. over police ‘use of force’, and charges of racism and racial-bias can’t help but spill over into Canada, and its affect has been profound as we wrestle with our own issues. True, the challenges in policing can vary distinctly between the U.S. and Canada, but the public reacts with the same mistrust when things go awry.

SPECIAL REPORT
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Canada bears the general strain and impact of illicit tobacco the same as many communities and countries around the world, and yet the conditions in Canada are somewhat unique in that the black market for illegal smokes is largely self-imposed.

SPECIAL REPORT
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

THE 360° APPROACH

Editor's Corner
(2016,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

In 2010 Police Chief magazine published an article titled: “s”. In it, they wrote about the critical role that needs to be played by local law enforcement in proactively preventing terrorism.

(2016,
issue 1)

There is a war going on in South Africa. It doesn’t, for the most part, involve armies or large battles, but it is a tough, dirty and vicious war nonetheless. Special forces, intelligence gathering, air operations, dog teams, covert surveillance, crime scene management, and many other experts are involved in this war, and at the forefront are the rangers of the national and private parks and the hunting and game reserves.

(2016,

Senator Bob Runciman has introduced a bill in the Senate to ensure judges have all the facts before they release violent or habitual criminals on bail.

Bill S-217, introduced on February 3rd, requires the prosecutor to make it known at the bail hearing if the accused has a criminal record, is currently facing other criminal charges or has failed to appear in court in the past. This may result in repeat offenders not getting any pre-trial credit at sentencing when they are deservedly denied bail because of their record.

(2016,

Senator Bob Runciman is pushing the federal government to institute a scholarship fund for the families of federal public safety officers killed in the line of duty.

In a statement in the Senate last week, Runciman urged Finance Minister Bill Morneau to put the measure in his upcoming budget.

(2016,

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, has offered condolences on behalf of the Government of Canada following the death of police officer Thierry Leroux in the community of Lac-Simon, on Saturday February 13, 2016.

(2016,

This past weekend, the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) “If You See Something, Say Something™” public awareness campaign materials were on display for the 2016 NBA All-Star Game in Toronto, through a new partnership with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. This is the first time the Department’s “If You See Something, Say Something™” materials have been used internationally.

(2016,

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has issued a statement on the review of workplace harassment within the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). This is the full text of his statement:

"The Prime Minister has given me a clear mandate to ensure that the RCMP is a healthy workplace, free from harassment and sexual violence.

(2016,

The Government of Canada has introduced legislation to create a new labour relations regime for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) members and reservists.

The legislation would address the Supreme Court of Canada decision on the Mounted Police Association of Ontario (MPAO) v. Attorney General of Canada case, which found key parts of the current RCMP labour relations regime to be unconstitutional.

(2016,

 

The video shows a (large black) man lying on his back in the street, holding his hands in the air. "All he has is a toy truck," the man shouts, worried that the police may harm his autistic (white male) patient who had run away from the group. "I am a behavior therapist at a group home." Inexplicably, the caregiver is shot in the leg by police as he lays on the pavement with his patient sitting at his feet (like a protective puppy).

(2016,

The Canadian Armed Forces’ (CAF) Judge Advocate General (JAG) is launching consultations with Canadians as part of the ongoing comprehensive review of the court martial system.

(2016,

In October 1986, 15 year old Kerrie Ann Brown of Thompson. Manitoba  was raped and murdered after she left a party. Now, the RCMP is using Twitter to recreate her day in words she might have used, to revive old memories and create new leads.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY VIKRAM KULKARNI
Significant contributions by real people

Globally, Canadians have earned a reputation as devoted humanitarians. As one of the most secure countries in the world, Canada, for the most part, enjoys sufficient flows of capital, labour, goods and services. The evolution of ‘Human Security’ practices is directly related to the values of democracy, tolerance, dignity, and respect.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

In the immediate aftermath of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, one of the most important realizations by Government was that a society’s crime vulnerabilities were likely national security vulnerabilities with potentially enormously dangerous consequences. 

(2015,
issue 1)
BY KEVIN HAMPSON

When four Alberta Mounties were gunned down on a farm just outside the small town of Mayerthorpe in March 2005, it sent shock waves through the RCMP. A fatalities inquiry in 2011 concluded that there was no way such an event could have been foreseen. A decade later, however, some observers say the RCMP still haven’t learned the lessons of Mayerthorpe – even after the similar tragedy in Moncton in June of 2014. These two tragic incidents have become intertwined, both indicative of the inertia that exists when it comes to making changes within the RCMP.

RCMP members at risk
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE

Right on the heels of the Independent Review into the Moncton Shooting, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) suffered another violent gun attack on their stretched line of ­operational officers – this time near ­Edmonton – killing Const. David Wynn, and seriously injuring an unarmed Auxiliary officer.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY CHIEF RHEAUME CHAPUT and SCOTT DAVIS

EM-COP: the New Reality of First Responder ­Technologies

One Last Thing
(2015,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

One of the most alarming aspects of the recent and growing terrorism attacks within domestic Western societies is their Islamist ideological motivation and the assurances from the bad guys that there will be more to come. The people who ‘lead’ these death cults have also figured out that they can advance their perceived cause by inspiring and instructing susceptible people in those same Western countries not simply to travel abroad to join them but rather to commit their horrific crimes in their own neighbourhoods so as to generate maximum fear value.

(2015,

The need for proper recognition, collection, and preservation of physical evidence is apparent to all who are involved in the criminal justice system. Physical evidence can directly or indirectly lead to the solution of a crime. Charging and prosecution decisions may be affected by the quality of the physical evidence supporting the case. The Wisconsin State Crime Laboratories provide an important link between collection and court presentation of such evidence. This handbook is offered in the belief that increased knowledge leads to understanding and that understanding leads to excellence.

(2015,

(April 2009) Striking a Balance Between Immigration Enforcement and Civil Liberties. This report presents findings and recommendations from the Police Foundation's year-long national effort that examined the implications of immigration enforcement at the local level. The project brought together law enforcement executives, policy makers, elected officials, scholars, and community representatives in a series of focus groups across the country and at a national conference in Washington.

(2015,

(Executive Summary) In addition to outlining the results of an investigation into the Toronto Transit Commission?s plans for the expansion of its video surveillance system, the report provides a review of the literature into the effectiveness of video surveillance, as well as an assessment of the role that Privacy-Enhancing Technologies play in protecting privacy.

(2015,

Her Majesty's Canadian Ships (HMC Ships) Brandon and Whitehorse recently concluded their participation in Operation CARIBBE 2015 with a substantial contribution to the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

One Last Thing
(2014,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Since 2006, FrontLine Security magazine has promoted the concept of intelligence-led enforcement in a variety of operational applications including matters related to border security. The success of that approach is detailed in this edition with the article regarding the deployment of the Accipiter Radar automated, analytical surveillance systems in the St. Lawrence and Great Lakes.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER

Arriving at Calgary’s City Hall C-Train platform, it is bustling as usual as I wait for Vikram Kulkarni, a Peace Officer with the Public Safety and Enforcement Section of Calgary Transit.

Interview: Dr Michael Kempa
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Dr Michael Kempa is an Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa, and a freelance journalist who enjoys diving into the messy reality of the politics and economics of policing and security. Editor Clive Addy talks to him about the current situation of rising costs without the benefit of rising budgets.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

Newspapers were full with stories of how the RCMP, supported by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), had just prevented a “terrorist attack” at the BC Legislature on July 1st (Canada Day) 2013. These unfolding events provided a revealing background to my inquiries about Canada’s maritime security infrastructure, and were relevant to my inquiries on how culturally different federal departments work together efficiently.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

The warning was unequivocal: Canadians must confront the steadily increasing numbers of technological traps, trip-wires and hazards that await the unprepared, the careless and the unaware.

In October, Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) president Tim Page opened SecureTech 2013, by describing Canada’s security environment. “Serious risks to pubic safety, threats to our eco systems, traditional way of life and national security challenges abound, and are growing in complexity, impact and cost.”

(2013,
issue 2)
BY MATHIEU DEFLEM

AMERICAN PERCEPTIONS OF TERRORISM

(2013,
issue 2)
BY LEAH WEST SHERRIFF

Though it may be cliché to comment on the way wireless technology has changed the modern world, today, mobile devices allow us to express ourselves through social media in real time, help us navigate our daily lives, enable us to bank, trade, buy and sell on the move, and allow us to carry the internet’s unlimited information resources in our back pocket.

RCMP C/Supt Joe Oliver
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1986, Chief Superintendent Oliver became Director General Border Integrity in April 2009. He was responsible for overseeing the delivery of five law enforcement programs that contribute to the national security of Canada, and the protection of Canadians from terrorism, orga­nized crime, and other ­border-related criminality.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

On April 22nd, CBC News broke a story about the RCMP arresting “two men accused of conspiring to carry out an ‘al-Qaeda supported’ attack targeting a Via [Rail] passenger train in the Greater Toronto Area.” The two suspects, Chiheb Esseghaier, 30, of Montreal, and Raed Jaser, 35, from Toronto, were charged with “conspiring to murder persons unknown for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with a terrorist group.”

(2013,

(2013) This is a planning primer was created by the US Bureau of Justice Assistance for law enforcement agencies at the local level. When law enforcement executives are tasked with managing a large event, they can maximize their efforts by learning from other agencies and adopting proven practices. Too often, however, past lessons learned are not documented in a clear and concise manner. To address this information gap, the U.S.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
A Compilation of FrontLine Articles

In the murky world of criminal behaviour and clandestine side deals, there lurks a menace to economic fairness and good government – and this is especially evident in the debate on how to deal with the illicit trade in smokes. Public safety and national security are important social issues that are negatively affected by the prevalence of illicit trade in tobacco in Canada (and the world). The complexity of the contraband tobacco issue has provided much fodder for FrontLine Security’s detailed exposé on the topic over the past year.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from Illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

The motto of Toronto’s Harbour Square Park is “The world in one place.” This phrase pertinently describes the diversity of people, activities and festivals celebrating Toronto’s multicultural society in the restaurants, shops, concerts, exhibitions and parks that straddle Toronto City inner harbour. With the proliferation of high rise condominiums, the area is one of Canada’s higher density residential locations. During the summer, the population expands by thousands as tourists flock to participate in the city’s many festivities.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY ARTHUR HSIEH

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) defines a relatively young public safety profession in the United States, when compared to law enforcement and fire services. In a scant 50 years, the delivery of pre-hospital care and transportation of the sick and injured has evolved rapidly. This rapid development has challenges as well, frequently stemming from oft-ignored and underlying major structural concerns that have not been fully addressed.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

View pdf

Canadian Cops Pioneer Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) give public agencies new ‘eyes in the sky’ and Canadian law enforcement is leading the way.

One Last Thing
(2012,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

It's More Than Gadgets and Gizmos
In the ‘non lab coat’ world of law enforcement, security and first responders, “technology” is a means to an end and not an end unto itself. That ‘end’, of course, is the successful performance of operational duties, which have enormous public safety ramifications as well as real risk to the men and women who perform them on our behalf.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

View PDF

The Strategy for a National EMS Culture of Safety asserts that "Emergency medical service (EMS) provider organizations nationwide potentially expose patients, practitioners and members of the public to preventable risk of serious harm, in contrast with advances in safety practices that have been broadly implemented in many other healthcare settings in recent years."

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

View PDF

Canadians see Mexico on a split screen. On one side, they see a tourist paradise that attracts 1.5 million Canadians every year. On the other: a drug war that has claimed 50,000 lives in five years...


Canadian Military meets with Mexican Army

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Across the vast expanse of the Arctic coast, on Great Slave Lake and in the Mackenzie Delta, boaters in distress look to members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) for assistance. In the Northwest Territories, the all-volunteer CCGA has units in Aklavik, Inuvik, Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Resolution, Fort Chipewyan and Fort McMurray. In Nunavut, the eastern Arctic, CCGA units are in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet and Pangnirtung.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

View PDF

As this issue of FrontLine Security forcefully demonstrates, when it comes to security related matters, co-ordination of activities is an essential element of success. This is so because the subject matter frequently involves both the private and public sector, all three levels of government and multiple inter-connected infrastructures or activities.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS
Transport Canada’s National Aerial Surveillance Program

Canada takes a risk-based management approach to ship-source pollution response, and seeks to prevent marine pollution ­incidents. This prevention and response ­capability to deal with marine pollution incidents arising from ships is buttressed by the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). Administered by the Canadian Coast Guard from its inception in 1991 until 2003 when Transport Canada took on the responsibility, the NASP is an integral element of Canada’s ocean management.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER
Leading a Modern Day Cavalry During Large-Scale Disasters

Fortunately, help was on the way. Well over 300 firefighters from more than 30 towns, cities and counties arrived to help battle nature’s inferno. Municipal officials were amazed and relieved. Mayor Karina Pillay-Kinnee remarked, “It was like the ­cavalry arrived.” More than 100 Alberta RCMP officers were also dispatched as part of the emergency response effort.

One Last Thing
(2011,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

That same hard truth also exists for much of the world of law enforcement including border security which has been in the news recently in Canada although this time, German arsonists notwithstanding, for some very encouraging reasons, collectively known as the Canada-US ‘Beyond the Border’ Agreement.  

One Last Thing
(2011,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

My introduction to the world of state espionage in Canada began in the mid 90’s with a phone call from a Liberal Cabinet Minister looking for help. The Minister had been alerted to some extremely serious, and substantiated, evidence of coordinated hostile activity by a foreign ­government within Canada. The evidence actually came from dedicated Canadian government officials and it exposed an incredibly complex web of organized crime, “business” investment, deliberate infiltration of institutions and disturbing political associations.

(2011,
issue 2)
A SOLUTIONS SHOWCASE

When it comes to providing the public safety system with all the resources it needs to protect the public and provide a secure and resilient community, all hands must be on deck to help. For all levels of government, this means creating policy that balances risk and public cost. For industries that have capabilities relating to public safety, this means being able to provide solutions that balance profitability and competitiveness.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY W.H. (BUD) GARRICK

Since 9/11, marine port security has been the subject of increased scrutiny as it is clear that contraband flows – undetected and uninterrupted – through access and egress points of both Canada and the United States. Numerous reviews initiated by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Canadian Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence have clearly articulated that ports are a haven for criminal activity and organized crime, as well as targets for potential terrorist activity.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Are North America’s ports vulnerable to attack that would cripple our economy or annihilate our society? The answer is no to both, but the safety of our economy from port ­disruption needs closer scrutiny. Threats to airports involve people and the potential use of aircraft as WMDs. Seaports, on the other hand, normally involve very little in the way of transporting people, though cruise boating continues to grow at double-digit rates.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY CRAIG S. LOSTY

COP – Common Operating (or Operational) Picture – includes relevant operational information such as ­command post, snipers, enemies, buildings, and terrain. It can be also represented visually, such as with maps, photos, pictometry, diagrams and charts. An effective COP will be simultaneously available to all ­participants while the action is occurring.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE

After more than 12 years in operation, Airport Watch has become a North American-wide concept. Its early beginnings date back to 1999 when a partnership was formed at the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport between members of the Ottawa Police Service, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the airport authority, and a newly formed group of aircraft enthusiasts turned citizen volunteers.

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Tsunamis, earthquakes and nuclear crises in Japan, droughts in China, the “Arab Spring” upheavals, Osama dead, Ratko captured, tornadoes in southern U.S., floods in Australia and, at home, fires in Alberta, floods in Manitoba and Quebec ... These and other situations force us to focus on the question: “What is the state of our emergency preparedness and security?”

(2011,
issue 1)
BY PASCAL RODIER

While the phrase “a once in a lifetime opportunity” often makes us think of a marketing scam or timeshare pressure sales, in this case it is very true. Emergency responders have a once in a lifetime opportunity to obtain 700 MHz broadband spectrum from Industry Canada. This will allow responders the needed spectrum to transfer mission critical data to and from scenes. Once this spectrum is gone it will be gone forever.

Chris Lewis
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

The Ontario Provincial Police is led by Commissioner Chris Lewis. With a 32-year career behind him (four of these as Deputy Commissioner), Lewis has significantly contributed to the OPP’s history of successful leadership.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY MICHAEL R. BOUCHARD

In October 2002, one year after the Washington D.C. terrorist attack on the Pentagon, residents of the area once again found themselves under assault. This time, the attack lasted 23 days when two individuals randomly shot and killed 10 innocent people and wounded three more. This was the first major multi-jurisdictional crisis that many public officials faced. Officials later found the pair had shot several other people across the U.S.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY
A Strategic Overview

Seldom do Canadians, as a nation, look much beyond next week, next month or next year. We tend to be laid-back and blasé about our future. We engage in a game of self-deception by assuming that the threat of any major harm is restricted solely to a major environmental event, such as blizzards, hurricanes or flooding, created by climate change.

One Last Thing
(2011,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As this issue of FrontLine Security forcefully demonstrates, when it comes to security related matters, coordination of activities is an essential element of success. This is so because the subject matter involved frequently involves both the private and public sector, all three levels of government and multiple inter-connected infrastructures or activities. Put differently, notwithstanding the wishes of some for a single, all powerful, government entity that is in charge of everything, that’s not reality – nor, thankfully, is it ever going to be.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

At the beginning of 2010, the government had just published its Critical Infrastructure Strategy and Action Plan and published this October another major ­document, its Cyber Security Strategy. Mr Justice Major revealed the findings of his inquiry on the Air India intelligence and other law enforcement shortcomings. Canada had the Olympics, the G8 and G20 to secure in an ever more visibly terror-laden world.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY BLAIR WATSON

“Mayday” is the internationally-recognized term used by pilots to communicate an emergency situation to the outside world – from the French word, m’aidez (meaning “Help me”). Of course, According to regulations, Nav Canada Air Traffic Controllers and Flight Service Station Specialists must respond to any statement by a pilot indicating that the crew or aircraft is experiencing difficulties and requires assistance. When a pilot declares an emergency, the aviation system responds as quickly as ­possible.

(2010,
issue 3)
By FrontLine Staff

Concerns surrounding children and teens sending sexual messages, nude photos and videos via text messaging is on the rise, yet the vast majority of kids are unaware of the short-term costs and the long-term ramifications associated with their actions. Since adolescents are less inhibited by technology, it’s important they are aware of the risks and know how to deal with situations these new technologies present.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Since that time, then Senator has indeed become President Obama and has launched (in March) the National Cybersecurity Initiative with a $40 billion budget.

William J. Lynn III
Deputy Director of Defense

"The reality is that we cannot defend our networks by ourselves. We need a shared defense.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY STEVEN HUTCHINSON
A Look at the Legal Landscape

“Financial and material gains from criminal activity should not be enjoyed by criminals. ­Not even after they have served prison terms.”

(2010,
issue 2)
BY KIM R MANCHESTER

Innovative South American narco-traffickers have recently expanded their cocaine smuggling repertoire with the use of diesel-electric submarines capable of handling ten-ton loads, replete with conning tower, periscope and air-conditioning. Such stealthy shipping vessels demonstrate clearly that well-funded drug cartels can approach the transportation of their product imaginatively.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY STEPHEN I LANDMAN

‘Within three to five years, Al-Qaeda will be utilizing the Internet and mobile phones to centralize their fundraising.’ This sobering assessment from Richard Barrett of the United Nations is a stark reminder of the threat posed by terrorist use of developing technologies – the virtualization of terrorism.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY YIAGADEESEN SAMY

Terrorism financing is a global problem requiring effective and coordinated solutions at the national, regional and multilateral levels. Fighting it, however, is costly; and measuring success is challenging.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Much has happened since our last edition. Three events in particular deserve mention here. First, I must commend Minister Toews for finally releasing the government’s first Federal Emergency Response Plan (FERP). With the Minister’s announcement of the FERP, Public Safety Canada has successfully responded to the call from many, including the Auditor General, to take the lead in setting policy and procedures for a robust response to any national emergency.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

If you talk to Alison Redford about what it takes to do her job as Alberta’s Attorney General, her answer isn’t what you would expect from the province’s top lawyer. Crime rates have eased since she was appointed in 2008 but Attorney General Redford would not attribute this success to any one development alone. And, she makes the point that getting tough on crime takes more than just getting tough – it takes getting smart.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT WRIGHT

Have you thought about your “digital shadow” recently? Whether you’ve thought about it or not, yours is probably growing. Unless you were born in a barn and live off the land, it’s hard not to have a digital footprint these days.

Brian Rexrod
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Q:How much damage can be mitigated if major companies such as Microsoft, AT&T, or, in Canada, Rogers, Bell and Telus provide the security before it reaches the user as your Chief of Security suggested last year?

(2010,
issue 1)
BY STEVEN MacLEAN

A year ago, Lieutenant Mike Parker, Unit Commander of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) EBD Unit presented a seminar on Education-Based Discipline (EBD) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia. The concept of education-based discipline challenged every notion of workplace discipline that had been ingrained in me during my 20 years in public safety and security.

(2010,
issue 1)
A PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE U.S.

The Homeland Security Institute (HSI) was conceived in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 9/11. In its report Making the Nation Safer, the National Academies proposed the creation of a dedicated, not-for-profit technical ­analysis and support institute for homeland security to provide the U.S. Federal Government with much needed analytic capabilities in support of effective counterterrorism-related decision making and program execution.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Secrets may be meant to be kept, but when it comes to ­solving crimes, police organizations need to share information. When it comes to breaking organized crimes and destroying criminal networks, real “intelligence” needs to be shared securely.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

Effective Understanding for Decision-Making
We can see from the definitions offered in Part 1 of this article (see Winter 2009/2010 edition) that an “effective understanding” of the Maritime Domain must come from a knowledge of the facts -- whether they originate from geo-spatial surveillance and reconnaissance data or intelligence analysis and assessment.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON

The largest security operation in Canadian history ­successfully wrapped up the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. Main security operations ended 48 hours after the principal sporting events finished. Security needs for the Paralympic Games (March 12-21) were ­significantly reduced.

 

(2010,
issue 1)
BY CRAIG S. GALBRAITH and CHRISTY DIFELICE

The range of highly advanced technology available to first responders is truly astounding. From cognitive radios to real-time field draw screens, record fire perimeters and 3-D personal tracking devices, first responder agencies are inundated with technological choices. Many of these technologies are being developed as spin-outs from defense contracts and grants. Others are entrepreneurial inventions targeted directly toward the primary response market. But what really are the needs of first responders?

(2010,
issue 1)
BY FRONTLINE STAFF
Sneak Preview

Coming in the next edition of FrontLine Security is an examination of the interworkings of organized criminal networks – what are the threats, and what can we do about them. Topics will be targeted at all security stakeholders, including first responders, government security policy managers and every business and individual who is concerned about or has experienced any fraudulent activity or identity theft.  

(2010,

(Feb 2010) This report provides policymakers, law enforcement executives, resource planners, and counterdrug program coordinators with strategic intelligence regarding the threat posed to the United States by the trafficking and abuse of illicit drugs. The assessment highlights strategic trends in the production, transportation, distribution, and abuse of illegal and controlled prescription drugs.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON

For six generations, approximately 95 percent of the Canada-US border was undefended; official crossing points were the chief exception. The boundary between our nation and the United States spans 6,416 kilometres – 2,878 km on land and 3,538 km on water – and includes terrain that is flat, hilly, and mountainous, vast tracks of prairie and forests, and lakes, rivers, creeks, and marshes. For decades, governments on both sides have tried to curtail smuggling and human trafficking.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

In a way, the “Brampton 18” is also an indicator of the change we have seen since 9/11. In one corner, we have seen civil liberties be reaffirmed with the demise of the vague and damaging security certificate; in the other corner we see the Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Anti-Terrorism Act in triumph with the pleas of guilty to terrorism charges that three of the 18 have made.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY FRAN HAWTHORNE

The array of neon colors, glittering on a flimsy strip of foil, is almost blinding. The colours illuminate a vertical row of five 5s, each in a unique set of pastels – green on purple, green on orange, coral on purple, and so on. Tilt the foil 45 degrees, however, and three of the 5s become the symbol for the euro, in different colours than before. Tilt again, and the strip is solid silver, with no colours or neon, with the 5s and euro symbols barely visible.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY BLAIR WATSON

In July, two rookie police officers of the Edmonton Police Service spotted a car with stolen license plates and pulled it over. As they searched the vehicle, the officers found 80 illegal credit cards as well as drugs and fake driver licenses. The occupants, a man and woman, were arrested.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON

Since before Confederation, the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River and other waterways through which the Canada-U.S. border runs have been maritime freeways used by smugglers. Booze, weapons, cigarettes, drugs and other cargoes such as illegal aliens have been transported between Canada and the United States for decades.  


RCMP Photo

(2009,
issue 2)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

Programs created by the federal, provincial and municipal govoernments have proven inadequate and a sense of hopelessness reigns both in Ottawa and on every reserve across the country.


Hobbema Cadets visit RCMP Training Centre in Regina, Saskatchewan.

Commissioner Bud Mercer
(2009,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Vancouver 2010

Q:As Chief Operating Officer responsible for the security 2010 Games, what is the scope and role of your challenge as you see it since your arrival in November 2007?

(2009,
issue 1)
BY FRONTLINE STAFF

In the wake of recent cyber security threats such as the Conficker virus scare and reports that the U.S. electrical grid was penetrated by cyber spies earlier this month, a former top U.S. cybersecurity official is sending out a reminder that no one is protected in this new, heavily-interconnected world, and that the best defense to the ever-increasing threat of cyber attack is a comprehensive response plan.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS A. TASS

From 1990, travel restrictions out of the post communist states almost evaporated. Simultaneously entry restrictions were significantly eased in the U.S., Canada and most western European countries.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY MIKE TODDINGTON

As identified by the Canada Council, competing ports in the U.S. have a much better foundation under which to work. American ports are publicly owned, and port officials are elected locally, therefore, port developments in the local public interest receive grants derived from local taxation. Alternatively, limited human and financial resources continue to present a significant disadvantage for Canadian ports.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ANGUS SMITH

Should we have been surprised by the terrorist siege of Mumbai? Probably not.
In a January 2005 article in The Atlantic, former White House security official Richard A. Clarke posited an “alternate future” for the post-9/11 decade. Clarke chronicled a series of terrorist attacks on the US homeland. The first wave consisted of simultaneous assaults on hotels and amusement parks; the second of a series of carefully planned shooting and bombing rampages in America’s largest shopping malls. In both ­scenarios, thousands died.

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Normally, when I’m asked to organize an event, I ensure that the subject matter is something in which I have some expertise. I made an exception to that rule earlier this year when the Conference Board of Canada asked me to put together a program for one of their highly regarded security conferences.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY DR SHAHRZAD RAHBAR
Critical Infrastructure Security

Today, the threats to industry vary from those of a decade ago. The natural gas ­distribution industry has responded to the challenge – we have improved our understanding of new threats; and we have taken steps to ensure the continued reliability of the critical infrastructure that delivers 24% of Canada’s end-use energy to Canadian industry, businesses and homes, and exports half of our production over 3 trillion cubic feet of natural gas to the U.S.

Supt Michel Aubin
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In the Drug Situation Report – 2006, the RCMP presented for the first time the troubling fact that: “Within a two year period, Canada has reversed its Ecstasy supply pattern status from an import and ­consumer nation to a major ­production and export country.” ­Continued smuggling of the MDMA precursor chemical MDP2P from China to Canada in 2006 confirmed heightened domestic Ecstasy manufacture.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY STEVEN DE LISI

Most firefighters today receive training that meets the objectives of the First Responder Operational level. Among the many tasks assigned to personnel at this training level are establishing scene control, initiating an incident management system, and performing defensive control functions and emergency decontamination procedures. Training involves classroom and hands-on skills to ensure students are fully capable of performing these and many more vital tasks necessary to ensure that the initial stages of a hazardous materials (hazmat) incident are handled safely and effectively.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

In their November 2007 report entitled, A Resilient Canada: Governance for National Security and Public Safety, by Trevor Munn-Venn and Andrew Archibald, the Conference Board of Canada has produced an insightful analysis of how Canadians formulate and implement governance in their national security and public safety ­organizations. Interestingly, after interviewing public and private sector leaders and experts in this subject area, the Board found that the greatest threat to national security perceived by these experts is “a lack of clarity around governance.”

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our main theme for this edition is on Critical Infrastructure Protection. The protection of these essential assets (80% of which are privately owned) is a major government responsibility that requires proper legislation and ­coordination. It is saddening how little progress and attention seems to have been brought to this real safety concern for all Canadians. The pleas go ­unanswered, but we continue – it is that important!

(2008,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

It was billed as a Transportation Security and Technology Forum with the goal of applying Canadian and global solutions. And it didn’t disappoint. Kicked off by a refreshingly candid analysis of maritime security ­vulnerabilities by Defense Minister Peter MacKay, the Conference Board of Canada’s November 2007 Transportation Security Conference ­featured an impressive array of speakers with detailed ­presentations and a series of ­specific recommendations for improvements.

AComm Bud Mercer
(2008,
issue 1)
BY J.K.M. BAMBI

Canadians are looking forward to celebrating and participating in the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and Paralympics Winter Games.

Ward Elcock
(2008,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Mr. Elcock is a respected veteran of security matters in the higher levels of the federal Public Service, having headed CSIS and been more recently the Deputy Minister of National Defence. FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, welcomes his perspective as a follow-up to our recent edition on the security of the 2010 Olympics.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In our winter issue, we have chosen to examine security for the upcoming 2010 Winter Olympics and have a first glance at how preparations are ­progressing since the official unveiling in September 2006 in Whistler.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY ALICE D'ANJOU

Over the past several years, a series of previously unthinkable events have caused the RCMP to consider its state of operational readiness. Sept 11th, Hurricane Katrina, and massive bombings in Madrid and London required extra­ordinary efforts from a wide range of responding agencies. Here at home, reports of flooding, forest fires, severe weather, blackouts, terrorist threats, and warnings of an inevitable flu pandemic arrive from all quarters on a regular basis.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE

Watching from the fenceline as Emirates Flight EK207 touches down on Toronto’s runway 24L at the end of its ­nonstop, 15-hour run from Dubai, aircraft enthusiast Andy Cline is thoroughly enjoying his hobby. As he closely observes the taxiing Boeing 777-300ER he (and about 150 other Airport Watch volunteers that regularly “spot” ­aircraft at Toronto-Pearson airport) is contributing to the safety and security of a major Canadian airport.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY DARLENE BLAKELY and RCMP NEWS REPORT

For more than a year and a half, investigators of the Montreal and Halifax RCMP Drug Sections carefully worked out every detail of this international sting operation. Project Chabanel was carried with the Canadian Navy and RCMP liaison officers in England, Morocco, Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates and Spain.

Senator Colin Kenny
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

One of the most knowledgeable and comprehensive examinations of the state of our Maritime Security has been one conducted by the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence. For the last six years, during its study, it has heard testimony, examined data, held regional hearings and visited our ports. The Committee has twice published its recommendations in ominously titled reports: Canada’s Coastlines The longest undefended borders in the World (2003), and a rather damning update of this initial report, entitled simply Coasts (2007).

(2007,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS
Canadian Maritime Domestic Security

National Security – The Sea Matters
Over the last six years, in the changed global security environment, Canadians have learned that National Security is a modern imperative that requires profound thought, development, investment, resourcing, and, most of all, government leadership and action. The new threat environment includes globalized threats such as terrorism, multi-national crime organizations, disease epidemics, and ­natural disasters – not simply traditional, state-oriented threats.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU
Canada-U.S. border partnerships in the St. Lawrence Seaway

On 3 September 2007, at about 6:40 p.m., officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the U.S. Coast Guard spotted an 18-foot boat ­transporting large green plastic bags on the St. Lawrence River. As the authorities approached, the driver abandoned the boat in the water, just off the eastern tip of Cornwall Island, Ontario, and fled on foot.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY MIKE TODDINGTON
Has Canada dropped the ball?

Canada has experienced a long and tortuous history of policing our Ports.


At the end of the First World War, the port police in Montreal are believed to have had more than 100 officers but in 1920 they numbered three individuals with limited responsibilty.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY NORMA REVELER

Radar surveillance systems have long been proven to be effective security tools in military applications – and now are affordable enough to be used by homeland security and law enforcement agencies that have tight budgets.


Accipter Radar tracks displayed at Operations Centre

(2007,
issue 2)
BY JAY C. HOPE
Practical Advice from Ontario’s Commissioner of Community Safety

Natural disasters can strike with ­little or no notice, causing large numbers of casualties and devastating local infrastructure. Impacts may include widespread power outages, road closures that block emergency response efforts, building collapses and structure fires. As the Com­missioner of Community Safety for Ontario and a for­mer Deputy Com­missioner of the Ontario Provincial Police, I know that within moments of a natural disaster striking, response resources and management systems can be stressed to the limit.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Would Canada be able to effectively respond to a Weapons of Mass Destruction attack? A cooperative initiative aimed at providing critical equipment and training to First Responders, is needed to enable them to safely intervene in Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) incidents. The solution – let’s call it a First Responder Rebate Program (FRRP) – would provide the equipment and training necessary for effective and efficient First Responder (FR) rescue operations.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY GARRY FRAPPIER and DAVID SACHS

With the recent convergence of debate on the potential for growth in Canada’s nuclear industry, and renewed terrorist threats directed at this country, it is timely to review the security situation of Canada’s nuclear facilities and materials. After 9/11, Canada’s nuclear regulator – the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) – determined that the entire industry (including its own organization) faced a need for significant enhancements in their approach to security.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY MARK GILES

Set between the Rhone River and the “Parc Tete d’Or” in Lyon, France – about an hour’s drive southwest of the Swiss border – is a rather unique looking building. As some of its security features become visible to the casual passer-by, including marked police vehicles and uniformed officers at the entrance, some might wonder what purpose it serves.


The General Secretariat in Lyon, France, serves as Interpol headquarters.

(2007,
U.S. and Canadian Government Report

(2007) This report, published jointly by the U.S. and Canadian governments, examines the current state of illicit drug smuggling across the United States-Canadian border. The report identifies the principal substances which are smuggled in both directions across the border. The authors place special emphasis on the cooperative efforts which law enforcement agencies on both sides of the border engage in and how this has influenced the movement of these illegal substances. (Note: be patient, this link takes a LONG time to load)

(2006,
issue 4)
BY TANYA MILLER

The length and geography of Canada’s shared border with the United States presents security challenges. To meet those challenges, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police’s Border Integrity Program tackles cross-border crime by taking an international and ­integrated approach in their investigations.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY JUDY BRADT

Follow the Money
Most first responder activities are carried out at the state and local government level, but the majority of funding for programs and equipment come from ­federal grants.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS

It’s up to us to disrupt it

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

I am very pleased to launch FRONTLINE SECURITY in the wake of the change in our national Government. One of the elements that we believe was called for in this change is a clearer and more knowledgeable debate of broader national security issues and their impact on our well-being and democratic society. Our magazine has been designed to offer such a national voice to this debate in a more security-conscious Canadian society. Just as Julian Fantino says of Emergency Preparedness in his interview in this issue, our own magazine is also “a work in progress.”

Interview: Julian Fantino
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Almost one year after his appointment as Commissioner of Emergency Manage­ment for the Province of Ontario, Clive Addy, FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, interviewed Julian Fantino about his thoughts on Security and Emergency Management.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD COHEN
Government can't do it alone

After 9/11, governments around the globe sprang to respond to the new threat. In Canada, the federal government implemented major structural changes and ­allocated billions of dollars to strengthen National Security and Public Safety. As well, recent natural catastrophes and ­public health scares have reminded us that terrorism is not the only danger we face. Although most governments have reacted energetically to these new challenges, the rest of society, including the business community, have for the most part, been sitting on the sidelines.