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(2017,
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(2017,
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(2017,
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The House of Commons committee on the status of women has recommended that all RCMP members and judges receive mandatory training about gender-based violence and sexual assault.

(2017,
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(2017,
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(2017,
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(2017,
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(2017,
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The Government of Canada has repealed the coming into force of the private right of action for violations of Canada's Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL). The Government has listened to concerns raised by businesses, charities and the not-for-profit sector about the implementation of CASL, which would have permitted individuals to sue for violations of the law.

(2017,
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(2017,
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(2016,
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(2016,
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Senator Bob Runciman has introduced a bill in the Senate to ensure judges have all the facts before they release violent or habitual criminals on bail.

Bill S-217, introduced on February 3rd, requires the prosecutor to make it known at the bail hearing if the accused has a criminal record, is currently facing other criminal charges or has failed to appear in court in the past. This may result in repeat offenders not getting any pre-trial credit at sentencing when they are deservedly denied bail because of their record.

(2016,
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(2016,
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The Government of Canada has introduced legislation to create a new labour relations regime for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) members and reservists.

The legislation would address the Supreme Court of Canada decision on the Mounted Police Association of Ontario (MPAO) v. Attorney General of Canada case, which found key parts of the current RCMP labour relations regime to be unconstitutional.

(2016,
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(2016,
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The Canadian Armed Forces’ (CAF) Judge Advocate General (JAG) is launching consultations with Canadians as part of the ongoing comprehensive review of the court martial system.

(2016,
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After the body of Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook was found in the Ottawa River, Sgt Chris Hrnchiar of the OPS forensic identification unit made some online remarks that now have him under internal investigation. Still on the job, Hrnchiar could face loss of pay, demotion, suspension or dismissal.

(2016,
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Last week, federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) ministers responsible for justice and public safety concluded two days of productive engagement, working on justice and public safety priorities for Canadians.

An Elder welcomed ministers to traditional Mi'kmaw territory.

(2016,
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(2016,
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(2016,
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Experts are meeting today and tomorrow at Carleton University to discuss “the challenges of dealing with natural resource development projects and activism" - or, in the words of one participant, how to protect Canada's infrastructure from "domestic extremists".

(2016,
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(2016,
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(2016,
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In 2012, CSIS knew exactly where John Maguire was before he left Canada to join ISIS in Syria, where he reportedly died fighting in 2015. Six months later, the RCMP was still trying to trace his movements.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY KEN POLE [field_writer2]

Transport Canada issued a “protective direction” on November 20th, requiring the major railway companies to provide detailed information on their cargoes to municipalities and first responders – but the quarterly and annual reports will only cover what had been shipped in the previous three months and 12 months, respectively. At best, it would give municipalities and first responders a feel for what has already gone through their jurisdictions, not what’s coming (somewhat akin to closing the stable door after the horse has bolted).

One Last Thing
(2013,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

One of the most important issues in policy development is to make sure that the subject being scrutinized is accurately identified so the right questions can be asked to help get the most effective answers. This is critical because the converse is also true; ask the wrong questions and you will get the wrong answers.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]
Surveillance, Censorship, Intolerance and Violence

Implications for privacy at the Sochi Olympics
Athletes train their entire lives to compete in their sport at the Olympics. But in Sochi, our athletes, their coaches, sports organization representatives, spectators and dignitaries may find themselves competing in a different sort of games… that have already begun (without an opening ceremony).

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ANGELA GENDRON [field_writer2]

The United Kingdom’s response to terrorism has been shaped by the various terrorist threats it has faced during the 20th century; from Russian anarchists, Irish republicans, Middle Eastern groups, to the supporters of causes such as animal rights. While the threat from Irish terrorism has diminished, an ongoing and serious terrorist threat to Northern Ireland remains. Currently, the UK assesses its most significant risk to national security as that from terrorism associated with and influenced by al-Qaeda.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LEAH WEST SHERRIFF

Though it may be cliché to comment on the way wireless technology has changed the modern world, today, mobile devices allow us to express ourselves through social media in real time, help us navigate our daily lives, enable us to bank, trade, buy and sell on the move, and allow us to carry the internet’s unlimited information resources in our back pocket.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY BARBARA McISAAC
Security vs Privacy

“He can either stand with us or with the Child Pornographers.” With those words, in response to a question from Liberal MP Francis Scarpaleggia, Public Safety Minister, Vic Toews may have put an end to Bill C-30, The Investigating and Preventing Criminal ­Electronic Communications Act. The short title of the bill, which no doubt gave rise to Toews comments, is the Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MICHAEL C. IRCHA
(2012,
issue 1)
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Canada's largest law firm, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP (BLG), has long recognized that businesses operating in the defence and security industry sectors routinely encounter complex issues that require a specialized type of legal expertise. For this reason, it created a Defence and Security Industry Group comprised of lawyers, patent agents and other professionals who have sectoral experience working with industry clients in a wide range of areas.

(2011,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY DAVID MUGRIDGE
Bringing Together Law and Technology

Weaknesses and Threats
Most serious security practitioners recognize the Western world’s vulnerability to ­maritime-based terrorist violence and that its inability to combat serious criminal activity at sea is increasing. Traditionally, global financial crises, like today’s, have resulted in marked deterioration of national and personal security. The need for flexibility in our national responses to maritime security challenges has never been greater, and with that flexibility comes the clear need for technology.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

If you talk to Alison Redford about what it takes to do her job as Alberta’s Attorney General, her answer isn’t what you would expect from the province’s top lawyer. Crime rates have eased since she was appointed in 2008 but Attorney General Redford would not attribute this success to any one development alone. And, she makes the point that getting tough on crime takes more than just getting tough – it takes getting smart.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr [field_writer2]

What happens when one or more of the complex systems that keep our civilization running break down? As unpleasant as it is to contemplate, this question dominates the thinking of Dr. Wolfgang Kröger, ­Professor and Director of the Laboratory for Safety Analysis of ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology).

One Last Thing
(2009,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Canadians can be forgiven for wondering which way is up when trying to decipher the flood of news recently surrounding the status of Canada’s actions in security related cases. One day we’re subjected to shrieking headlines announcing the judge ordered “end” of security certificates – complete with a grinning Adil Charkaoui cutting off his electronic monitoring ankle bracelet – and the next it’s confirmed one of the ringleaders from the 2006 Toronto terrorism plots has just plead guilty.

(2009,
issue 1)
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2007/2008 What a Difference a Year and a UDI Makes

Mitrovica is Europe’s most divided city – Belgrade’s last bastion of influence in Kosovo – a thorn in the side of both the newly sovereign Kosovo Assembly in Pristina and the international community overseeing Kosovo’s new status. It is the flashpoint of most post-independence violence and demonstrations, and the seat of power for the illegal ­“parallel-institutions” that divide Kosovo’s internal governance with that of Belgrade’s.

(2008,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY ADRIAN KING

Piracy on the high seas has been making the news headlines; most notably with the audacious hijacking in November of the Saudi-owned super tanker Sirius Star. At present the vessel, together with its multinational crew, languishes off the Somali coastal town of Hardeheere while negotiators attempt to reach an agreement with the present illegal custodians over a ransom payment for its release. The Sirius Star is just one of many vessels hijacked in recent times by pirates operating from Somali coastal towns and ports.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY MIKE TODDINGTON
Has Canada dropped the ball?

Canada has experienced a long and tortuous history of policing our Ports.


At the end of the First World War, the port police in Montreal are believed to have had more than 100 officers but in 1920 they numbered three individuals with limited responsibilty.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

Canada and her European allies had best beware of the Lebanon-based ­terrorist group Hezbollah as UN negotiations to halt Iran’s military nuclear program continue in stalemate, and tensions rise with Israel and the U.S.

On July 11, the eve of the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers that sparked the recent conflict, Ali Larijani, the head of Iran’s National Security Council, threatened European Union negotiators that Iran would harm Western interests if its nuclear program was referred back to the UN Security Council.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY PETER HILLIER [field_writer2]

Outsourcers have a responsibility to protect client data regardless of where it flows or is stored – as is certainly highlighted by a barrage of client data security breaches of late.

(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY JAY N. ROSENBLATT

GOOD BUSINESS SENSE
Greg Pellegrino, Global Managing Director, Public Sector, at Deloitte Research, in a Study entitled: “Prospering in the Secure Economy” explains the new secure economy, and the opportunity for enhancing business value by responding through investment in responsible approaches to security.