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(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG RICHARDS, MBA, Ph.D, FCMC

Many public safety organizations are keenly interested in deriving value from the massive amounts of data currently available to them. In situations were analytic staff are not available to work with this data, or when it makes sense to analyze data in several different ways, organizations are partnering with educational institutions.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY FRONTLINE STAFF
Closing the Public Safety and Security Technology Gap

As the complexity and reach of global threats continues to increase, the demands on public safety and first responders are also growing.
Recent reports – including studies by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and public safety organizations around the world – have confirmed that first responders want timelier mission-critical information to decrease response times and detect and mitigate threats before they happen. Interestingly, this is similar to what militaries around the world need for the battlefield.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF
Encouraging development of safety & security initiatives

Upon taking the helm as the new executive editor of FrontLine Safety & Security, I let readers know that I would be seeking out examples of best practices in safety and security – success stories. I am pleased in this article to report on new safety and security tools, materials and knowledge, all ­arising from investments made through Public Safety Canada’s Kanishka program.

(2016,

A wildfire in the hills of the Deodoro Region in Rio de Janeiro has raised some concerns for the Olympics. As the winds have been gaining strength, a close eye needs to be kept on this fire.

The men's and women's BMX events are to take place in these hills over the next few days. Nothing has been reported yet as to whether or not the events will be postponed or canceled due to the fire.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE


Canadians should take warning from the events in Paris on 13 November. Too often, Canadians dismiss terrorist threats, warnings and close calls with the usual attitude that “Canada is not important enough to attract terrorism,” or that “it can’t happen here.” That kind of thinking is dangerous. It can happen here, and it has happened here.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY VIKRAM KULKARNI
Significant contributions by real people

Globally, Canadians have earned a reputation as devoted humanitarians. As one of the most secure countries in the world, Canada, for the most part, enjoys sufficient flows of capital, labour, goods and services. The evolution of ‘Human Security’ practices is directly related to the values of democracy, tolerance, dignity, and respect.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

No doubt there is much pressure to re-examine on your election pledge regarding Canada’s role in the fight against ISIS and we at FrontLine add our voice to this request, ­particularly in light of recent and escalating events.

Editor's Corner
(2015,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

My first 9 months as executive editor of Frontline Safety and Security has been a great learning process that included meeting with and learning from the people and organizations responsible for keeping Canadians Safe and Secure. The purpose of these meetings was to learn more about their issues, about what they wanted – and needed – to read about in the pages of FrontLine.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY NICOLA DAVIES

Fear and propaganda are the weapons of war and, increasingly, so too is social media. Indeed, social media has come under attack as it becomes the ideal media outlet for terrorists and extremist groups. Recruitment, training, ­planning and coordination of attacks, intimidation tactics, and displays of weaponry and power have all been achieved online through avenues such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Whatsapp.

Editor's Corner
(2015,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF
A Request to FrontLine Readers

It has been an interesting first few months for me as the new editor of Frontline Safety and Security. I have spent the last few months meeting with organizations tasked with, or interested in, keeping the public safe – let’s call them partners in safety and security. These have included various intelligence organizations, associations, first responders, and Universities.

(2015,

(2013) This is a planning primer for local law enforcement agencies. When law enforcement executives are tasked with managing a large event, they can maximize their efforts by learning from other agencies and adopting proven practices. Too often, however, past lessons learned are not documented in a clear and concise manner. To address this information gap, the U.S.

(2015,

(updates daily) This site lists the latest global earthquakes with magnitudes of 2.5 or greater in the United States and Adjacent Areas, and a magnitude of 4.5 or greater in the rest of the world.

(2015,

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2015,

(2009) Marsh's Chemical Practice has produced a 2009 benchmark study that compares the risk management and insurance programs of more than 220 chemical industry buyers in the United States.Marsh's Chemical Practice has produced a 2009 benchmark study that compares the risk management and insurance programs of more than 220 chemical industry buyers in the United States.

(2015,

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2015,
by Health Canada

Health Canada has released numerous reports on topics related to Climate Change and Health, including a Heat Alert Guidebook. For a compendium, check this web site.

(2015,

(2009) Events have illustrated that both under-developed and developed countries can be overwhelmed by climatic events and that people living in Canada may be vulnerable to climate risks.

(2015,

(March 2009) AHRQ has developed more than 60 emergency preparedness-related studies, workshops, and conferences to help hospitals and health care systems prepare for public health emergencies. Many of these projects were made possible through collaboration with ASPR and other federal agencies. For more information, contact AHRQ Public Affairs: 301-427-1859 or 301-427-1855.

(2015,

(June 2008) Securing America's mass transit systems presents a real challenge for federal, state, and local agencies and for the transit systems themselves. Long routes and open facilities make the systems vulnerable and very limited financial resources make it difficult for systems to reduce those vulnerabilities.

Editor's Corner
(2014,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

General Clive Addy steered this magazine throughout its first nine formative years; following in his footsteps will be a distinct honour. Throughout the many years of service to his country, he has given much. Upon retiring from the Canadian Armed Forces, he found a unique way to continue to serve his country – he used this magazine as a vehicle to promote awareness of the need to enhance national security. It is with pleasure that I have accepted the position of incoming Executive Editor of FrontLine Security magazine.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

As I end my nine years as first Executive Editor of this fine magazine, and reflect upon the coming security challenges we face as Canadians in the next half decade and beyond, what has most struck me is the exponential increase in the number and complexity of security challenges and risks brought about by a myriad of important factors, the most prevalent of which is the dominating and increasing presence, influence and dependence upon the internet for everything in our much changed “every day lives”.

(2014,

(Feb 2009) This report describes existing and upcoming technologies, markets, business and funding opportunities related to producing, using, and/or stockpiling Chemical, Biological, Nuclear and Radiological (CBRN) decontamination equipment and materials for the purpose of decontaminating people, as well as indoor and outdoor environments. The need to decontaminate people, buildings and infrastructures after CBRN incidences will lead to an $8.3 billion market by 2020 for CBRN Decontamination equipment sales & maintenance.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER

Arriving at Calgary’s City Hall C-Train platform, it is bustling as usual as I wait for Vikram Kulkarni, a Peace Officer with the Public Safety and Enforcement Section of Calgary Transit.

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

As we head into 2014, FrontLine Security offers some very pertinent ­reflections on the complex challenges of policing and disaster management. I trust that our articles will stimulate the additional discussion and debate.

First, Dr. Michael Kempa, a most respected researcher in his field, gives us a broad but comprehensive perspective on challenges in modern Canadian Policing in this more complex, and interconnected global environment, and the correspondingly changing face of Canadian community policing.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE

The warning was unequivocal: Canadians must confront the steadily increasing numbers of technological traps, trip-wires and hazards that await the unprepared, the careless and the unaware.

In October, Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) president Tim Page opened SecureTech 2013, by describing Canada’s security environment. “Serious risks to pubic safety, threats to our eco systems, traditional way of life and national security challenges abound, and are growing in complexity, impact and cost.”

Senator Hugh Segal
(2013,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Clive Addy: First, might I thank you, Senator, for accepting to do this interview. A few years ago, terrorism was seen as something that happened elsewhere and was performed on and by people other than Canadians. How times have changed! Today and most recently, Canadians have witnessed fellow citizens being involved in terrorist activity, funding and support around the world.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY LEAH WEST SHERRIFF

Though it may be cliché to comment on the way wireless technology has changed the modern world, today, mobile devices allow us to express ourselves through social media in real time, help us navigate our daily lives, enable us to bank, trade, buy and sell on the move, and allow us to carry the internet’s unlimited information resources in our back pocket.

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our Roots
We have dedicated this issue to Border Security. It is both timely and important that we do so, for we North American neighbours find ourselves at a critical juncture in this more globally accessible and competitive world where we benefit from reasonably stable governments, are blessed by vast territory, rich resources, significantly intertwined economies and secular institutions open to all members of our society.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As this issue of Frontline Security demonstrates, a critical part of border security is the detection and interdiction of guns and drugs, and now people, that criminals, and possibly worse, are trying to smuggle into Canada. Getting it right in border security is essential because what gets through at the border inevitably ends up on the streets of our communities, and this means more criminal activity and less public safety.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
Courses of Action

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
Improving Communications Across Borders For Responders

On the morning of 6 December 1917, in the port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, near the U.S. border in Maine, a French ship, the Mont Blanc, filled with military explosives collided with another vessel. Twenty minutes later, a fire set off the Mont Blanc’s volatile cargo and caused a catastrophic explosion – killing thousands and destroying an entire section of the nearby city. Rescue efforts were dispatched immediately from the Canadian mainland as well as the United States, but confusion and lack of immediate information delayed some of the rescue efforts for hours.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
A Compilation of FrontLine Articles

In the murky world of criminal behaviour and clandestine side deals, there lurks a menace to economic fairness and good government – and this is especially evident in the debate on how to deal with the illicit trade in smokes. Public safety and national security are important social issues that are negatively affected by the prevalence of illicit trade in tobacco in Canada (and the world). The complexity of the contraband tobacco issue has provided much fodder for FrontLine Security’s detailed exposé on the topic over the past year.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from Illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Where does Canada stand on the topic of CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) threats – this less likely, most dangerous, and much discussed realm of security and safety threats to humanity? There are a myriad of international treaties and conventions on these matters.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY ARTHUR HSIEH

Emergency Medical Services (EMS) defines a relatively young public safety profession in the United States, when compared to law enforcement and fire services. In a scant 50 years, the delivery of pre-hospital care and transportation of the sick and injured has evolved rapidly. This rapid development has challenges as well, frequently stemming from oft-ignored and underlying major structural concerns that have not been fully addressed.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE

View pdf

Though well-recognized as vital in the public safety and security sector, interoperable communications remain a constant challenge. This was made clear at a recent closed door event coordinated by General Dynamics Canada (GDC), where industry, government and customers addressed today’s ­capability gaps.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY KEVIN WENNEKES

View pdf

Changing Culture in Changing Times
A fundamental culture shift is taking place among First Responders (police, fire, and emergency medical services personnel) as they seek to adopt and adapt the technology tools and applications that can affect all aspects of their ability to serve the communities they are sworn to protect.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY PIERRE BILODEAU

View pdf

Enhancing Situational Awareness for Intelligent Emergency Management 
Awareness for Intelligent ­Emergency ManagementWhen a flood, tornado, chemical spill or other disaster occurs, it’s crucial to have a comprehensive view of where the incident happens and how it unfolds in order to deliver effective emergency services.

One Last Thing
(2012,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

It's More Than Gadgets and Gizmos
In the ‘non lab coat’ world of law enforcement, security and first responders, “technology” is a means to an end and not an end unto itself. That ‘end’, of course, is the successful performance of operational duties, which have enormous public safety ramifications as well as real risk to the men and women who perform them on our behalf.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

View PDF

The Strategy for a National EMS Culture of Safety asserts that "Emergency medical service (EMS) provider organizations nationwide potentially expose patients, practitioners and members of the public to preventable risk of serious harm, in contrast with advances in safety practices that have been broadly implemented in many other healthcare settings in recent years."

(2012,
issue 1)
BY PASCAL RODIER

View PDF

When my generation of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel thinks of data sharing in the field, we have visions of Squad 51 using their Biophone; a combination voice and telemetry radio communications system. Paramedics could call the base hospital and not only talk to the doctor but could also send live cardiac data by way of electrocardiogram rhythms.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

View PDF

As this issue of FrontLine Security forcefully demonstrates, when it comes to security related matters, co-ordination of activities is an essential element of success. This is so because the subject matter frequently involves both the private and public sector, all three levels of government and multiple inter-connected infrastructures or activities.

(2012,

(2011) Health care facilities need to develop an Emergency Water Supply Plan (EWSP) to prepare for, respond to, and recover from a total or partial interruption of the facilities' normal water supply because water supplies can, and do, fail. The objective of this Planning Guide is to help health care facilities develop a robust EWSP as part of its overall facility EOP and to meet the published standards set forth by the Joint Commission and the CMS. The guide is intended for use by any health care facility, regardless of size or patient capacity.

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

We are closing in on 15 years since the infamous Ice Storm crippled much of Eastern Ontario, Western ­Quebec, and the Northeastern States. Many remember the feeble briefings provided by authorities during the first few days – when power pole numbers, rather than geographical locations, were used to describe power outages to a troubled and doubly confused public. The worrying was shared by citizens unable to heat, cook, travel, wash or get medical treatment... or even get the flawed information. Are we better prepared now than we were then?

(2011,
issue 4)
BY LANCE VALCOUR

A recent workshop on Canadian Public Safety Interoperability held true to its theme “From Results to Success” with numerous speakers explaining to the over 300 ­delegates how their interoperability efforts are now bearing fruit. However, one major issue that remains to be resolved is that of 700 MHz Broadband for Mission Critical Data. The entire country awaits Industry Canada’s decision on what to do with this “beachfront property.”

Gina Wilson
(2011,
issue 4)
BY KEN POLE

ICE could be the Inescapable Canadian Element, one that demands cooperation for survival. ICE could also be an Implacable ­Climatic Experience, which presents formidable challenges to governments, industry and individuals – as demonstrated by the 1998 ice storm that essentially shut down major parts of Eastern Canada and the ­northeastern United States.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY PATTI XENOS and DOUG ALLPORT

Because the snow prevented first responders from reaching their Emergency Operations Centres, they quickly established virtual operations, triggering ground and air ­rescue missions using their laptops and telephones. In the absence of situational awareness tools (SA), critical information was relayed between police, fire, and emergency medical services (EMS) using telephone and email across several jurisdictions (Lambton County, Middlesex, Sarnia, St. Clair Township/County, Michigan) and between the Ontario Provincial Police, Canadian Forces and the utility companies.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY FRAN HAWTHORNE

The spraying of the deadly Ebola virus into a crowded subway, for example, could kill or injure hundreds of civilians. Or, as in the movies “Contagion” and “Outbreak,” entire towns might be quarantined and millions infected by a virulent, mutated bat virus or an Ebola-like virus, respectively.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY DORON BERGERBEST-EILON
From Corporate Espionage

We know that attacks on critical infrastructures from criminal threats, corporate or industrial espionage and/or politically motivated sabotage, could threaten public safety, impact national security, or even create economic upheaval or environmental disaster. What we may not know is that a large percentage of critical infrastructures is actually privately owned and that private security forces are becoming the primary protectors of vital infrastructure.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

With a long history of defence trade show success with behind it, the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI) was challenged with how to do the same for the security industry. CANSEC has rapidly grown over the years to be the largest defence trade show in Canada.

(2011,
issue 2)
A SOLUTIONS SHOWCASE

When it comes to providing the public safety system with all the resources it needs to protect the public and provide a secure and resilient community, all hands must be on deck to help. For all levels of government, this means creating policy that balances risk and public cost. For industries that have capabilities relating to public safety, this means being able to provide solutions that balance profitability and competitiveness.

Editor's Corner
(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Tsunamis, earthquakes and nuclear crises in Japan, droughts in China, the “Arab Spring” upheavals, Osama dead, Ratko captured, tornadoes in southern U.S., floods in Australia and, at home, fires in Alberta, floods in Manitoba and Quebec ... These and other situations force us to focus on the question: “What is the state of our emergency preparedness and security?”

(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

The face of public safety is changing because information and ­communications technologies are permitting First Responders to understand the environment facing them on a mission. For example, if firefighters or police had a complete picture of the event as they were about to respond, they would be better able to deal with the challenges once they arrive on scene. An EMS call could potentially save more lives, for instance, if the paramedics could send high resolution images of the injury to an attending but remote medical specialist.

James Arden Barnett
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

An interview with Rear Admiral (Ret) James Arden Barnett, Chief, Federal Communications Commission,U.S. Bureau of Public Safety and Homeland Security,discussing the 700MHz bandwidth situation in the USA.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY PASCAL RODIER

While the phrase “a once in a lifetime opportunity” often makes us think of a marketing scam or timeshare pressure sales, in this case it is very true. Emergency responders have a once in a lifetime opportunity to obtain 700 MHz broadband spectrum from Industry Canada. This will allow responders the needed spectrum to transfer mission critical data to and from scenes. Once this spectrum is gone it will be gone forever.

Chris Lewis
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

The Ontario Provincial Police is led by Commissioner Chris Lewis. With a 32-year career behind him (four of these as Deputy Commissioner), Lewis has significantly contributed to the OPP’s history of successful leadership.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY PAUL KOVACS

Some day a large earthquake will strike Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa or another large urban centre in Canada. Such an event has the potential to cause loss of life, property damage and economic disruption unprecedented for Canada. The tragic and contrasting experiences last year in Haiti and Chile show that appropriate investments in preparedness and resilience can help prevent future earthquakes from becoming disasters.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CRAIG S. GALBRAITH and LOU KELLY

Can a local university make a significant difference in regional first responder and homeland security efforts? The answer is yes – if done right. Universities often have the reputation (sometimes deserved, sometimes not) of being intellectually and physically distant from the surrounding community, the classic “ivory tower” analogy. This is somewhat understandable since the historical dual-pronged mission of higher education institutions is to first, educate our post-secondary students, and second, contribute to the continuously expanding body of scholarly knowledge.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY PTSC-ONLINE

PTSC-Online is Canada’s virtual on line community for emergency manage­ment, business continuity and critical infrastructure protection professionals. It is also a source of emergency management related information for the Canadian public. This report underlines key points of its operation as a test project since mid-year 2010. It also highlights the ­benefits of using and supporting PTSC-Online, identifies the financial needs for its continued operation, and offers options for continued financial support.

Editor's Corner
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

At the beginning of 2010, the government had just published its Critical Infrastructure Strategy and Action Plan and published this October another major ­document, its Cyber Security Strategy. Mr Justice Major revealed the findings of his inquiry on the Air India intelligence and other law enforcement shortcomings. Canada had the Olympics, the G8 and G20 to secure in an ever more visibly terror-laden world.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Today’s changing and complex environment of national security and ­public safety has underlined the role that innovation plays in battling terrorism and mitigating the effects of large scale national disasters. The need for cooperation and the coordination of resources is required if the world is to be effective in battling sustained terrorist threats or to ­mitigate major disasters.

Vic Toews
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

This year has been very productive at the Department of Public Safety, from both the legislative and policy implementation points of view. As well, there has been a greater degree of coordination and integration with our U.S. neighbour in many security domains.


Minister Vic Toews delivers a speech at the CentrePort Construction milestones event in Winnipeg, June 18, 2010.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY AARON WYNN and KIERAN MOORE

The global population is approaching 7 billion people and, combined with the ease and frequency of modern air travel, this gives rise to a rapidly increased public health risk at major world events. Mass gatherings, as they have come to be called, are largely pre-planned events, held for a limited time and attended by more than 25,000 people. These events can include any number of purposes – political, religious, athletic – and can be attended by, for instance, 300,000 rabid soccer fans at a FIFA World Cup, or 2.5 million pilgrims at the Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

(2010,
issue 3)
BY TYSON MACAULAY
Metrics-Based Assessment and Policy Indications

Most research into Critical Infrastructure Interdepen­dency (CII) is based upon ad hoc observations, anecdotes and partial incident-accounts which describe some but not all Critical Infrastructure (CI) sectors and their conditions after the incident. ­Metrics-based systems for understanding, mapping and modeling of CII have been evolving slowly.  

(2010,
issue 3)
By FrontLine Staff

Concerns surrounding children and teens sending sexual messages, nude photos and videos via text messaging is on the rise, yet the vast majority of kids are unaware of the short-term costs and the long-term ramifications associated with their actions. Since adolescents are less inhibited by technology, it’s important they are aware of the risks and know how to deal with situations these new technologies present.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Since that time, then Senator has indeed become President Obama and has launched (in March) the National Cybersecurity Initiative with a $40 billion budget.

William J. Lynn III
Deputy Director of Defense

"The reality is that we cannot defend our networks by ourselves. We need a shared defense.

Lt-General Michael Jeffery
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Canada Must Face the Potential for Domestic and Global Threats!

(2010,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

If you talk to Alison Redford about what it takes to do her job as Alberta’s Attorney General, her answer isn’t what you would expect from the province’s top lawyer. Crime rates have eased since she was appointed in 2008 but Attorney General Redford would not attribute this success to any one development alone. And, she makes the point that getting tough on crime takes more than just getting tough – it takes getting smart.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Secrets may be meant to be kept, but when it comes to ­solving crimes, police organizations need to share information. When it comes to breaking organized crimes and destroying criminal networks, real “intelligence” needs to be shared securely.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

To ensure common objectives such as public safety and security stay at the forefront of an ever-changing global environment, all moving parts of a nation’s security force need to be working in sync and constantly communicating. This, however, is much easier said than done.
 

(2010,

(Jan 2010) As crude oil prices climbed back over US$80.00 per barrel during 2009 (after the dramatic spike to $147 and subsequent collapse to $35) U.S. politicians and regulators knew who to blame.

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

We need a National Security Policy with teeth, now. Particularly its Emergency ­Preparedness and Critical Infrastructure ­Protection elements, and one which allies, neighbours, businesses, provinces and municipalities can, with confidence, know is indeed protecting our citizens and resources reliably… as most, incorrectly, expect we now do.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

In a way, the “Brampton 18” is also an indicator of the change we have seen since 9/11. In one corner, we have seen civil liberties be reaffirmed with the demise of the vague and damaging security certificate; in the other corner we see the Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Anti-Terrorism Act in triumph with the pleas of guilty to terrorism charges that three of the 18 have made.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
Emergency Preparedness in Barrie

Catastrophe struck on 31 May 1985, in the form of a devastating blast from Mother Nature. A tornado ravaged the busy community of Barrie – providing what current Mayor Dave Aspden describes as his city’s wakeup call. The CBC later tallied the devastation to this city of 128,000: Eight lives lost, 155 injuries, 300 homes destroyed, and more than $100 million in damages.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
Partnerships for Safer Communities

Internationally, Canadians considered progressive, compassionate, smart, careful, etc. – all positive accolades for sure. But we’re also thought to be a bit naive which isn’t so good when it comes to getting prepared for natural disasters and catastrophic events. Global events over the years have taught us that large scale industrial accidents and super storms can hit without much if any warning.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY SHANE LOATES
Increase Awareness and Decrease Response Times

Today’s security environment demands integrated solutions that minimize risks by maximizing the available information to security personnel. Fortunately, software solutions can help to tie legacy systems together into a common operational picture to help you get the most from your investments.

Dr David Butler-Jones
(2009,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In our Spring 2006 issue, Dr. David Butler-Jones, then recently appointed Public Health Officer of Canada, expressed to FrontLine Security, the goals and aspirations of his newly minted agency.  Since then, many public health issues have come to the fore, such as the ongoing H1N1 swine flu and the recent Listeriosis outbreak, to name but two.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY JEZ LITTLEWOOD

Canada is a safe, stable, secure democracy. That is not to say that Canada faces no challenges to its security, but as the 2007-2008 annual report of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) states, the number of actual terrorist incidents in Canada has been minimal over the last few years. Nothing similar to September 11, 2001 has occurred since that date, and it has been over two decades since the tragic Air India bombing that originated in Canada.

(2009,
issue 1)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

Vancouver will undoubtedly be swarming with people in February and March 2010. In addition to the 2.1 million existing residents in the metropolitan area, an additional 1.2 million athletes, media and spectators are expected to find their way to the lower mainland for the Winter Olympics and Paralympics.

(2009,

(February 2009) Although the consequences of a radiologic dispersal device are substantial, and the detonation of a modest-sized (10 kiloton) improvised nuclear device is catastrophic, it is both possible and imperative that a medical response be planned.

(2009,

(May 2009) The global LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) shipping, handling and storage infrastructure is extremely vulnerable to a terrorist attack which, if successful, could have catastrophic results – both in terms of lives lost and economic impact. Securing this infrastructure is quickly becoming a top national security priority.

(2009,
By the College of Marine and Earth Studies

(Nov 2009) To predict the path and landfall of a hurricane or other coastal storm and assess the damage, emergency managers and scientists need continuous information on the storm?s path, strength, predicted landfall, and expected damage over large areas. Satellite and airborne remote sensors can provide the required information in a timely and reliable way. The lessons learned from hurricane Katrina are helping optimize future approaches for tracking hurricanes and predicting their impact on coastal ecosystems and developed areas.

(2009,
By the Government of Canada

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2009,
By the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans

(June 2009) Fourth Report from the Standing Senate Committee on Fisheries and Oceans calls for more attention to the future role and capability of the Coast Guard.

(2009,

(June 2009) Conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this report summarizes the relative importance of identified releases in terms of potential health risks at Los Alamos. The Los Alamos facility had a single mission – perfection of the design and manufacture of the first atomic bombs.

(2009,
By the National Association of State EMS Officials

(July 2009) This Gap Analysis Template is intended for use by governments, educators and others as they begin to define the specific differences at the state and local level between current and future EMS education delivery. It is useful to consider gaps between an existing scope of practice compared to what may be implemented under the new SOP model and the Education Standards. This document can be used to begin identifying educational content that will need to be accounted for in the transition of existing EMS personnel as well as the delivery of future programs.

(2009,

(2009) The World Health Organization has retained the use of a six-phased approach for easy incorporation of new recommendations and approaches into existing national preparedness and response plans.

(2009,

(Nov 2009) This audit report by the Privacy Commissioner of Canada examined whether the Department of Transport Canada has adequate controls and safeguards to collect, use, disclose, retain, dispose, protect and ensure the accuracy of personal information under the Passenger Protect Program. The core of the Passenger Protect Program is the Specified Persons List, otherwise known as Canada's "No-fly list."

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Usually critical of government (in)action on criminal justice and security issues, I was ­uncharacteristically upbeat when asked by FrontLine Security to comment on the state of ­current progress on border security in Canada. Such unusual confidence comes from the simple but unmistakable fact that – despite all the foot dragging, doubletalk, cost over­estimates, institutional rivalries and the ‘we’ve always done it that way’ attitudes – progress has been made, and more is clearly on the way.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY BRIAN PHILLIPS

So often, for those of us who deal daily with the vulnerability of our critical infrastructures, what we do for a living feels like selling insurance to people who are just trying to survive day to day.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY LANCE VALCOUR

Have you ever found yourself, in an emergency, a few hundred yards away from a public safety colleague – police officer, fire fighter, or paramedic – yet unable to transmit vital information to him or her? It happens all too often. Radio systems, cell phones, PDAs, and other devices are not always configured, aligned or even designed to allow inter-agency communication. Often the communications are seriously limited by the available technology. At other times, the agencies lack the proper protocols, governance or knowledge of how to communicate with each other.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our Spring issue on Terrorism and Critical Infrastructure Protection ­generated much interest and comment. As we embark on the key trial of Momin Khawaja, the first Canadian-born to be charged under the new ­terrorist legislation, the issues brought up in our last edition by Howie Marsh and Tom Quiggin will surely resonate in the minds of our readers.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY ERNEST MACGILLIVRAY

New Brunswick is a relatively small jurisdiction, the third smallest in Canada, with a population of just 750,000. The lead provincial agency for emergency management is the New Brunswick Emergency Measures Organization (NB-EMO), with a permanent staff of nine people. On reflection, the province performed quite well during this year’s flood – far better than during a similar flood in 2005. We examine some of the interesting reasons why, and explain how the province is incorporating recent lessons learned to improve its emergency program for the future..

Supt Michel Aubin
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In the Drug Situation Report – 2006, the RCMP presented for the first time the troubling fact that: “Within a two year period, Canada has reversed its Ecstasy supply pattern status from an import and ­consumer nation to a major ­production and export country.” ­Continued smuggling of the MDMA precursor chemical MDP2P from China to Canada in 2006 confirmed heightened domestic Ecstasy manufacture.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY ALAN BURKE
For the good of all, it is time to adapt!

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

In their November 2007 report entitled, A Resilient Canada: Governance for National Security and Public Safety, by Trevor Munn-Venn and Andrew Archibald, the Conference Board of Canada has produced an insightful analysis of how Canadians formulate and implement governance in their national security and public safety ­organizations. Interestingly, after interviewing public and private sector leaders and experts in this subject area, the Board found that the greatest threat to national security perceived by these experts is “a lack of clarity around governance.”

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Country and Western singer Toby Keith immortalized this phrase in his gravelly ballad about relationship expectations. His sentiment was right at home last month at the Conference Board of Canada’s Critical Infrastructure (CI) Security Conference. As several presenters and delegates noted, despite the passage of six and a half years since 9/11, Canada still lacks a comprehensive, clear strategy aimed at securing Critical Infrastructure and ensuring, to the extent possible, its business resiliency.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY STUART BRINDLEY
Do Government and Critial Infrastructure Sectors Communicate?

In the Spring 2007 edition of FrontLine Security, I described the work underway to develop ­voluntary partnerships between those who own and operate our critical infrastructures and their U.S. and Canadian governments. These partnerships will help establish trusted ­mechanisms to share information between governments and the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors; information that is essential to address the threats and hazards that could disrupt the reliable delivery of basic services such as telecommunications, electricity, water, fuel, and natural gas.

AComm Bud Mercer
(2008,
issue 1)
BY J.K.M. BAMBI

Canadians are looking forward to celebrating and participating in the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and Paralympics Winter Games.

(2008,
By the Transportation Research Board, Washington

(2008) Transportation and evacuation professionals are part of emergency management teams in some urban areas, but the potential for transportation in general and transit in particular to play a more significant role in emergency response and evacuation is far from being realized.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY ROBERT HUEBERT

The Arctic is changing. Combined factors of climate change, resource development and changing geo-political concerns create an Arctic that is becoming more accessible – and thus coveted – by the outside world. The increased tempo of southern penetration of the north will provide opportunities for Canadians, but, at the same time, create difficult challenges to solve. The uncertainty of how this will manifest itself is perhaps the greatest difficulty now facing Government officials.

Public and Private Information Sharing
(2007,
issue 4)
BY JIM ROBBINS

Motivated partially by self-preservation, but also by a “carrot & stick” combination of grants and threats of litigation – the public and private sector “information sharing and analysis” that occurred prior to Y2K was unprecedented.

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

We are fortunate to have a piece by the new Commissioner of Public Safety in Ontario, Com­mis­sioner Jay Hope on his  role and that of Emergency Manage­ment Ontario and the ordinary citizen.

Rear Admiral Roger Girourd
(2007,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY
JTF Pacific puts disaster response to the test

On 15 June, the order to stand down on the Fraser Flood Emergency Response was given by the Solicitor General of BC and a successful operation was completed. Earlier, weather experts had warned that the melting snow would soon cause the mighty Fraser River to flood its banks. This, of course, triggered emergency response personnel at all levels to dust off their plans and equipment and prepare. In analyzing a natural disaster in the making, FrontLine Security interviewed a key player in this response.

We're In This Together!
(2007,
issue 1)
BY STUART BRINDLEY

Professional emergency planners know that even the best plans depend on the extent to which critical infrastructure (CI) services are available to help responders mitigate and recover from the event. While local emergencies such as storms and accidents often disrupt CIs, work-arounds are often possible in short order, and additional materials and labour can be supplied from outside the affected area.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY PHILIP DAWE and KEN MARSHALL

Many threats and hazards have the potential to undermine the security and safety of Canadians. These threats and hazards can be man-made, such as acts of terrorism, or they can be natural, such as floods, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The ability of the public safety and security community to manage these emergencies and disasters can be aided by information technology. In particular, ‘geospatial’ information technology (technology that ties information to a location – a mapping system) is proving increasingly useful to emergency managers.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY MARK GILES

Set between the Rhone River and the “Parc Tete d’Or” in Lyon, France – about an hour’s drive southwest of the Swiss border – is a rather unique looking building. As some of its security features become visible to the casual passer-by, including marked police vehicles and uniformed officers at the entrance, some might wonder what purpose it serves.


The General Secretariat in Lyon, France, serves as Interpol headquarters.

Ron Moran
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In 2004, the Martin government formed the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) by moving parts of the former Customs and Revenue Agency and parts of Immigration into this entity as a Separate Operating Agency under Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada. In August 2006 in Vancouver, Prime Minister Harper reiterated his government’s commitment to reinforce the security along our border with the United States, and in recent months both U.S.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY JACK E. SMITH

A year ago, the Science and Technology Foresight Directorate of the Office of the National Science Advisor (ONSA) was asked to assist the new Public Security Technical Program (PSTP), a joint security technology initiative of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) and Defence Research & Development Canada (DRDC).

(2006,
issue 4)
BY JUDY BRADT

Follow the Money
Most first responder activities are carried out at the state and local government level, but the majority of funding for programs and equipment come from ­federal grants.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Few would argue that 9/11 changed the world in fundamental ways. The impact in Canada was almost as profound as in the U.S. and the response by governments here and south of here was laudable – lots of scurrying round with new anti-terrorism committees, intergovernmental talks, and cross ­border treaties.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY TIM CONNORS

Chief among their conclusions ought to be that this threat has global reach and is alive and well – and that there is no silver bullet counter measure that will prevent the next attack. Both assessments have profound meaning for how our state and local public safety agencies are organizing and preparing their people for this new age of security.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY NORMA REVELER

Advances in the ability of scientists to predict severe weather disturbances and natural disasters will not protect the public if warnings don’t get out. That message was recently delivered by Dr. Ian Rutherford, executive director of the Canadian Meteor­ological and Oceano­graphic Society (CMOS), to Canada’s broadcast regulator. He recounted how newly acquired Doppler radars have doubled the technologically possible warning time for tornadoes since one touched down in Edmonton in 1987 when he was in charge of the Alberta city’s weather service.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

When the FedEx driver reported what he was carrying when he became involved in a car accident, people paid attention. His March 2, 2005 shipment included samples of anthrax, tuberculosis, E. coli, influenza and salmonella – all deadly viruses.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

I am very pleased to launch FRONTLINE SECURITY in the wake of the change in our national Government. One of the elements that we believe was called for in this change is a clearer and more knowledgeable debate of broader national security issues and their impact on our well-being and democratic society. Our magazine has been designed to offer such a national voice to this debate in a more security-conscious Canadian society. Just as Julian Fantino says of Emergency Preparedness in his interview in this issue, our own magazine is also “a work in progress.”

Interview: Julian Fantino
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Almost one year after his appointment as Commissioner of Emergency Manage­ment for the Province of Ontario, Clive Addy, FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, interviewed Julian Fantino about his thoughts on Security and Emergency Management.

(2006,

(November 2006) This primer is intended to serve as a quick reference in the event of a radiation disaster. It summarizes information on preparing for a radiation emergency, handling contaminated persons, dose assessment and radiation exposure health effects. It also includes information on radiological findings related to agents of biological and chemical terrorism because radiologists may be involved in the diagnosis of conditions associated with such exposures.

(2005,
By the Library of Congress

(2005) Marine shipments of hazardous chemical cargo may be attractive terrorist targets because of their large volume and inherent toxicity or flammability. The Maritime Transportation Security Act and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code give the U.S. Coast Guard far-ranging authority over the security of hazardous marine shipping. The agency has developed port security plans addressing how to deploy federal, state, and local resources to prevent terrorist attacks.

(2001,

(March 2001) The MHMI series is a three volume set of pdfs (with a video) comprised of recommendations for on-scene (prehospital), and hospital medical management of patients exposed during a hazardous materials incident. Vol I: Emergency Medical Services; Vol II: Hospital Emergency Departments; Vol III: Medical Management Guidelines.The MHMI series is a three volume set of pdfs (with a video) comprised of recommendations for on-scene (prehospital), and hospital medical management of patients exposed during a hazardous materials incident.