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(2017,
issue 1)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

According to Peter Drucker, a renowned leader in the development of management education, “Effective leadership is not about making speeches or being liked; leadership is defined by results, not attributes.” This notion of leadership is quite evident in the context of professionals who work in emergency services or other frontline professions. In this realm, the difference between a competent worker and a senior leader takes on a whole new meaning.

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The House of Commons committee on the status of women has recommended that all RCMP members and judges receive mandatory training about gender-based violence and sexual assault.

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Over the years, hard work, heroism and Hollywood created the RCMP of legend - tenacious, courageous and above all, honourable. Today, after a series of scandals, Canada's national police force may enjoy a better reputation with foreign visitors that citizens at home.

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(français ci-dessous)

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) announced today that a Montréal man has been sentenced to 12 months in prison and his trucking company Réno Réal Inc. has been fined $567,645 for attempting to smuggle tobacco into Canada.

(2017,
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(français ci-dessous)

Through the International Police Peacekeeping and Peace Operations program, police officers from across Canada support efforts to build a more secure world through peace operations and other stabilization efforts.

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Occupational health and safety falls under provincial jurisdiction for correctional officers in Canada (even those who work in federal institutions), which means resources and access for getting treatment for operational stress injuries varies greatly from province to province. The union is calling for a national strategy to resolve this serious gap in protecting correctional officers.

(2017,
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​Hexagon Safety & Infrastructure and Frequentis have been selected to supply mission-critical technologies for the “ELKOS Austria” project, a nationwide, unified command and communication system. The companies will also support the refurbishment of the current control and command system at the warning centre in Lower Austria.

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(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

In one of my early columns, I made the point in that FrontLine needs to look at keeping the general population safe and secure more broadly than we had in the past. Food safety, for example, is important and not just from the perspective of bio-terrorism threats. The animal connection to safety and security was addressed in a prior issue. Manufacturers of safety and security equipment also play an important role through their equipment research and development. Future issues of FrontLine will look at aviation safety and more.

(2016,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] PAUL ROMEO

OFFICER TRAINING

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Police analytics can be extremely valuable in the fight against terrorism and crime. By identifying which events are most likely to escalate, predictive techniques can both improve prevention capability and control costs by deploying officers before escalation and where they are needed most.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Police analytics has been gaining more and more attention (which means FrontLine readers will see more on this topic in future editions). When the Ottawa Police Services began looking into it, they identified some 150 police analytics centers in the United States alone.

(2016,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY FRONTLINE STAFF
Closing the Public Safety and Security Technology Gap

As the complexity and reach of global threats continues to increase, the demands on public safety and first responders are also growing.
Recent reports – including studies by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and public safety organizations around the world – have confirmed that first responders want timelier mission-critical information to decrease response times and detect and mitigate threats before they happen. Interestingly, this is similar to what militaries around the world need for the battlefield.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Providing information that will help our frontline responders keep us safer and more secure is the overriding objective of FrontLine Safety and Security. To this end, I am always on the lookout for ideas, research, and other materials that can be presented to our readers. In our Winter edition of the magazine, we will be focusing on police analytics.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

Are innovations making cities safer as they get smarter? At a recent conference entitled Smart Cities: Shaping the Future, held in the United Kingdom, experts from all over the world shared their stories of how technology is being applied in their cities to create a safer environment.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY VALARIE FINDLAY [field_writer2]

The boiling anger in the U.S. over police ‘use of force’, and charges of racism and racial-bias can’t help but spill over into Canada, and its affect has been profound as we wrestle with our own issues. True, the challenges in policing can vary distinctly between the U.S. and Canada, but the public reacts with the same mistrust when things go awry.

Editor's Corner
(2016,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

In 2010 Police Chief magazine published an article titled: “s”. In it, they wrote about the critical role that needs to be played by local law enforcement in proactively preventing terrorism.

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Senator Bob Runciman is pushing the federal government to institute a scholarship fund for the families of federal public safety officers killed in the line of duty.

In a statement in the Senate last week, Runciman urged Finance Minister Bill Morneau to put the measure in his upcoming budget.

(2016,
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The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, has offered condolences on behalf of the Government of Canada following the death of police officer Thierry Leroux in the community of Lac-Simon, on Saturday February 13, 2016.

(2016,
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Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has issued a statement on the review of workplace harassment within the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). This is the full text of his statement:

"The Prime Minister has given me a clear mandate to ensure that the RCMP is a healthy workplace, free from harassment and sexual violence.

(2016,
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The Government of Canada has introduced legislation to create a new labour relations regime for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) members and reservists.

The legislation would address the Supreme Court of Canada decision on the Mounted Police Association of Ontario (MPAO) v. Attorney General of Canada case, which found key parts of the current RCMP labour relations regime to be unconstitutional.

(2016,
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Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement yesterday following an on-duty incident that led to the death of Vancouver Island RCMP Constable Sarah Beckett:

“On behalf of all Canadians, I would like to express my deepest condolences to the family, friends, and colleagues of RCMP Constable Sarah Beckett, who was killed in an on-duty auto collision this morning. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family and loved ones during this incredibly difficult time.

(2016,
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The National Governors Association (NGA) today announced that five states – Alaska, Hawaii, Illinois, Utah and West Virginia – will participate in a policy academy on emergency communications interoperability.

“Interoperability” refers to how federal, state and local emergency responders communicate with each other by voice, data and video on demand and in real time. Interoperable emergency communications are essential to effective public safety, response and recovery operations in the wake of disaster.

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Community leaders are justifiably worried that the probe will be too limited; they urge authorities to consider all possible federal and state criminal charges against officers who were caught on video killing a man who was already pinned to the ground by multiple police officers in Baton Rouge, and another killed in Minnesota after a traffic stop.

Timeline

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The video shows a (large black) man lying on his back in the street, holding his hands in the air. "All he has is a toy truck," the man shouts, worried that the police may harm his autistic (white male) patient who had run away from the group. "I am a behavior therapist at a group home." Inexplicably, the caregiver is shot in the leg by police as he lays on the pavement with his patient sitting at his feet (like a protective puppy).

(2016,
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Rank-and-file police officers are circulating a petition to express a vote of non-confidence in the leadership of Chief Charles Bordeleau. Officers are alleging a personal friendship has absolved another senior officer of misconduct.

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In 2012, CSIS knew exactly where John Maguire was before he left Canada to join ISIS in Syria, where he reportedly died fighting in 2015. Six months later, the RCMP was still trying to trace his movements.

(2016,
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(2015,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] TECHNOLOGY PROFILE

It’s all over the news. Riots in the streets and increased tensions with police shootings. Debates about use-of-force are in the limelight, and law enforcement departments are being scrutinized for how they train officers for such scenarios. The limited availability of range time, the expense of range facility maintenance, the cost of live ammunition, and a technological evolution in training options have forced agencies to admit that simulated training has become as a more practical and cost-effective option.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY KEVIN HAMPSON [field_writer2]

Is the paramilitary culture and its inherent warrior ethos incongruous with today’s society?

(2015,
issue 1)
BY KEVIN HAMPSON [field_writer2]

When four Alberta Mounties were gunned down on a farm just outside the small town of Mayerthorpe in March 2005, it sent shock waves through the RCMP. A fatalities inquiry in 2011 concluded that there was no way such an event could have been foreseen. A decade later, however, some observers say the RCMP still haven’t learned the lessons of Mayerthorpe – even after the similar tragedy in Moncton in June of 2014. These two tragic incidents have become intertwined, both indicative of the inertia that exists when it comes to making changes within the RCMP.

RCMP members at risk
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Right on the heels of the Independent Review into the Moncton Shooting, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) suffered another violent gun attack on their stretched line of ­operational officers – this time near ­Edmonton – killing Const. David Wynn, and seriously injuring an unarmed Auxiliary officer.

(2015,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY CHIEF RHEAUME CHAPUT and SCOTT DAVIS

EM-COP: the New Reality of First Responder ­Technologies

(2015,
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The need for proper recognition, collection, and preservation of physical evidence is apparent to all who are involved in the criminal justice system. Physical evidence can directly or indirectly lead to the solution of a crime. Charging and prosecution decisions may be affected by the quality of the physical evidence supporting the case. The Wisconsin State Crime Laboratories provide an important link between collection and court presentation of such evidence. This handbook is offered in the belief that increased knowledge leads to understanding and that understanding leads to excellence.

(2015,
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The need for proper recognition, collection, and preservation of physical evidence is apparent to all who are involved in the criminal justice system. Physical evidence can directly or indirectly lead to the solution of a crime. Charging and prosecution decisions may be affected by the quality of the physical evidence supporting the case. United States and Wisconsin Supreme Court decisions have placed great emphasis upon physical evidence in criminal cases. This handbook is offered in the belief that increased knowledge leads to understanding and that understanding leads to excellence.

(2015,
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(April 2009) Striking a Balance Between Immigration Enforcement and Civil Liberties. This report presents findings and recommendations from the Police Foundation's year-long national effort that examined the implications of immigration enforcement at the local level. The project brought together law enforcement executives, policy makers, elected officials, scholars, and community representatives in a series of focus groups across the country and at a national conference in Washington.

(2015,
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(Executive Summary) In addition to outlining the results of an investigation into the Toronto Transit Commission?s plans for the expansion of its video surveillance system, the report provides a review of the literature into the effectiveness of video surveillance, as well as an assessment of the role that Privacy-Enhancing Technologies play in protecting privacy.

(2015,
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Her Majesty's Canadian Ships (HMC Ships) Brandon and Whitehorse recently concluded their participation in Operation CARIBBE 2015 with a substantial contribution to the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

(2015,
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(2014,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

The mind is the most powerful tool we have at our disposal, and its abilities shouldn’t be taken for granted. Memories stored in our brain constitute a large part of who we are, and our long-term memory allows us to memorize not only facts, but also repetitive physical movements. This is known as muscle memory, or motor learning, a type of procedural memory that is developed by programming a specific motor task or movement into the brain’s memory through repetition.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY LANCE VALCOUR [field_writer2] and CHIEF JEFF BROOKS

Much activity and improvement in the realm of public safety communications interoperability have occurred since the horrific events of September 11th, 2001. One very promising area is that of wireless paramedicine, the ability to get paramedics, and the health community they support, the information they need when needed.

(2014,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

The soaring appeal of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is undeniable. Whether autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or remotely-piloted vehicles (RPVs) in fixed-wing or rotorcraft configurations, the technologies enable the public and private sectors to dramatically reduce costs. Their military value has been demonstrated in Afghanistan, and other public-sector uses such as law enforcement, forest fire surveys and environmental monitoring are proving equally effective.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

The current generation of simulator is a technological marvel – putting lone officers or groups onto realistic firing ranges or into a selection of the hundreds of interactive, video-based scenarios to confront a range of threats with a variety of resource options. Training systems can be packed into one travel case for delivery to remote locations, and set it up in a matter of minutes for training or qualifying.

One Last Thing
(2013,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

One of the most important issues in policy development is to make sure that the subject being scrutinized is accurately identified so the right questions can be asked to help get the most effective answers. This is critical because the converse is also true; ask the wrong questions and you will get the wrong answers.

Interview: Dr Michael Kempa
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Dr Michael Kempa is an Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa, and a freelance journalist who enjoys diving into the messy reality of the politics and economics of policing and security. Editor Clive Addy talks to him about the current situation of rising costs without the benefit of rising budgets.

(2013,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY PIERRE PORIER

First Responders strive to keep the public safe during emergencies. Such careers often put their own safety at risk, and yet we regularly hear ­stories of courage in the face of those ­perils.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MATHIEU DEFLEM

AMERICAN PERCEPTIONS OF TERRORISM

Senator Hugh Segal
(2013,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Clive Addy: First, might I thank you, Senator, for accepting to do this interview. A few years ago, terrorism was seen as something that happened elsewhere and was performed on and by people other than Canadians. How times have changed! Today and most recently, Canadians have witnessed fellow citizens being involved in terrorist activity, funding and support around the world.

RCMP C/Supt Joe Oliver
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1986, Chief Superintendent Oliver became Director General Border Integrity in April 2009. He was responsible for overseeing the delivery of five law enforcement programs that contribute to the national security of Canada, and the protection of Canadians from terrorism, orga­nized crime, and other ­border-related criminality.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]
Do Unsecure Communications Put Officers at Risk?

During the manhunt for the suspected Boston Marathon bombers in April, hundreds of thousands of people listened to police radio communications live over the Internet as hobbyists rebroadcast messages. Listeners then passed on information via Twitter, so that hundreds of thousands more learned how the hunt was proceeding from their computers, iPhones and BlackBerries, in very close to real time.

(2013,
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(2013) This is a planning primer was created by the US Bureau of Justice Assistance for law enforcement agencies at the local level. When law enforcement executives are tasked with managing a large event, they can maximize their efforts by learning from other agencies and adopting proven practices. Too often, however, past lessons learned are not documented in a clear and concise manner. To address this information gap, the U.S.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from Illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]

The motto of Toronto’s Harbour Square Park is “The world in one place.” This phrase pertinently describes the diversity of people, activities and festivals celebrating Toronto’s multicultural society in the restaurants, shops, concerts, exhibitions and parks that straddle Toronto City inner harbour. With the proliferation of high rise condominiums, the area is one of Canada’s higher density residential locations. During the summer, the population expands by thousands as tourists flock to participate in the city’s many festivities.

(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY KEVIN WENNEKES

View pdf

Changing Culture in Changing Times
A fundamental culture shift is taking place among First Responders (police, fire, and emergency medical services personnel) as they seek to adopt and adapt the technology tools and applications that can affect all aspects of their ability to serve the communities they are sworn to protect.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

View pdf

Canadian Cops Pioneer Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) give public agencies new ‘eyes in the sky’ and Canadian law enforcement is leading the way.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

PREPARE & RESPOND
The worst floods in recorded history occurred in central China between July and November 1931, where as many as four million people died from drowning or related diseases such as cholera and typhus. Of the five deadliest floods on record, all have occurred in China. Most recently, in July 2012, torrential rains hit the central part of the country, causing in devastating floods and mudslides. At least 77 victims perished and millions were forced to evacuate their communities.

One Last Thing
(2012,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

It's More Than Gadgets and Gizmos
In the ‘non lab coat’ world of law enforcement, security and first responders, “technology” is a means to an end and not an end unto itself. That ‘end’, of course, is the successful performance of operational duties, which have enormous public safety ramifications as well as real risk to the men and women who perform them on our behalf.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

View PDF

In April 2009, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported that computer hackers thought to be Chinese or Russian had breached a key computer network of U.K. defence giant BAE Systems in 2007 and 2008 and stolen several terabytes of data related to the United States' F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). BAE has been a major industrial partner on the $382-billion aerospace program during the past eight years. Not surprisingly, U.S. officials downplayed the story.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

View PDF

As this issue of FrontLine Security forcefully demonstrates, when it comes to security related matters, co-ordination of activities is an essential element of success. This is so because the subject matter frequently involves both the private and public sector, all three levels of government and multiple inter-connected infrastructures or activities.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER [field_writer2]
Leading a Modern Day Cavalry During Large-Scale Disasters

Fortunately, help was on the way. Well over 300 firefighters from more than 30 towns, cities and counties arrived to help battle nature’s inferno. Municipal officials were amazed and relieved. Mayor Karina Pillay-Kinnee remarked, “It was like the ­cavalry arrived.” More than 100 Alberta RCMP officers were also dispatched as part of the emergency response effort.

(2011,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY PATTI XENOS and DOUG ALLPORT

Because the snow prevented first responders from reaching their Emergency Operations Centres, they quickly established virtual operations, triggering ground and air ­rescue missions using their laptops and telephones. In the absence of situational awareness tools (SA), critical information was relayed between police, fire, and emergency medical services (EMS) using telephone and email across several jurisdictions (Lambton County, Middlesex, Sarnia, St. Clair Township/County, Michigan) and between the Ontario Provincial Police, Canadian Forces and the utility companies.

(2011,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY SGT STEPHEN SADLER

The morning view is always spectacular as I head out to my 4.5-ton Mercedes G-wagon (armoured vehicle) for the start of another work day. The area where I stand, a fairly flat plateau at 1250 metres above sea level, is surrounded by mountain peaks that are now covered in snow.


Sgt. Sadler mentors ANP officers on course.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Across the vast expanse of the Arctic coast, on Great Slave Lake and in the Mackenzie Delta, boaters in distress look to members of the Canadian Coast Guard Auxiliary (CCGA) for assistance. In the Northwest Territories, the all-volunteer CCGA has units in Aklavik, Inuvik, Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Resolution, Fort Chipewyan and Fort McMurray. In the eastern Arctic, Nunavut, there are units in Cambridge Bay, Rankin Inlet and Pangnirtung.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]
When Common Sense and Courage Are No Longer Enough

First responders are on the front lines of counter-terrorism. When terrorists attack, emergency services personnel have no choice but to react. That makes police, fire and medical personnel vulnerable to attackers that can strike anonymously, from a distance, with invisible weapons.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY W.H. (BUD) GARRICK [field_writer2]

Since 9/11, marine port security has been the subject of increased scrutiny as it is clear that contraband flows – undetected and uninterrupted – through access and egress points of both Canada and the United States. Numerous reviews initiated by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Canadian Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence have clearly articulated that ports are a haven for criminal activity and organized crime, as well as targets for potential terrorist activity.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Are North America’s ports vulnerable to attack that would cripple our economy or annihilate our society? The answer is no to both, but the safety of our economy from port ­disruption needs closer scrutiny. Threats to airports involve people and the potential use of aircraft as WMDs. Seaports, on the other hand, normally involve very little in the way of transporting people, though cruise boating continues to grow at double-digit rates.

(2011,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY CRAIG S. LOSTY

COP – Common Operating (or Operational) Picture – includes relevant operational information such as ­command post, snipers, enemies, buildings, and terrain. It can be also represented visually, such as with maps, photos, pictometry, diagrams and charts. An effective COP will be simultaneously available to all ­participants while the action is occurring.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

After more than 12 years in operation, Airport Watch has become a North American-wide concept. Its early beginnings date back to 1999 when a partnership was formed at the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport between members of the Ottawa Police Service, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the airport authority, and a newly formed group of aircraft enthusiasts turned citizen volunteers.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The face of public safety is changing because information and ­communications technologies are permitting First Responders to understand the environment facing them on a mission. For example, if firefighters or police had a complete picture of the event as they were about to respond, they would be better able to deal with the challenges once they arrive on scene. An EMS call could potentially save more lives, for instance, if the paramedics could send high resolution images of the injury to an attending but remote medical specialist.

James Arden Barnett
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

An interview with Rear Admiral (Ret) James Arden Barnett, Chief, Federal Communications Commission,U.S. Bureau of Public Safety and Homeland Security,discussing the 700MHz bandwidth situation in the USA.

Chris Lewis
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The Ontario Provincial Police is led by Commissioner Chris Lewis. With a 32-year career behind him (four of these as Deputy Commissioner), Lewis has significantly contributed to the OPP’s history of successful leadership.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY TYSON MACAULAY [field_writer2]
Metrics-Based Assessment and Policy Indications

Most research into Critical Infrastructure Interdepen­dency (CII) is based upon ad hoc observations, anecdotes and partial incident-accounts which describe some but not all Critical Infrastructure (CI) sectors and their conditions after the incident. ­Metrics-based systems for understanding, mapping and modeling of CII have been evolving slowly.  

(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY BANK OF CANADA

The Scenario
You walk into a store and hand the cashier a $20 bill in exchange for some groceries. The cashier takes your note and looks at it, and then tells you, 'Sorry, I'll need another $20. I think this one's a fake.'

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In a recent book entitled Tainted Money, author Avi Jorisch states: ‘As Washington reaches out to financial and foreign ministries around the globe, policymakers and laymen alike should be keenly aware of the financial dangers we will need to counter – whether they stem from rouge regimes like Iran and North Korea, the Osama bin Laden’s of the world, or criminals that are engaged in illicit activity.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY STEVEN MacLEAN

A year ago, Lieutenant Mike Parker, Unit Commander of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) EBD Unit presented a seminar on Education-Based Discipline (EBD) at the Justice Institute of British Columbia. The concept of education-based discipline challenged every notion of workplace discipline that had been ingrained in me during my 20 years in public safety and security.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Secrets may be meant to be kept, but when it comes to ­solving crimes, police organizations need to share information. When it comes to breaking organized crimes and destroying criminal networks, real “intelligence” needs to be shared securely.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

The largest security operation in Canadian history ­successfully wrapped up the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics. Main security operations ended 48 hours after the principal sporting events finished. Security needs for the Paralympic Games (March 12-21) were ­significantly reduced.

 

(2010,
[field_writer2]

(Feb 2010) This report provides policymakers, law enforcement executives, resource planners, and counterdrug program coordinators with strategic intelligence regarding the threat posed to the United States by the trafficking and abuse of illicit drugs. The assessment highlights strategic trends in the production, transportation, distribution, and abuse of illegal and controlled prescription drugs.

Commissioner Bud Mercer
(2009,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]
Vancouver 2010

Q:As Chief Operating Officer responsible for the security 2010 Games, what is the scope and role of your challenge as you see it since your arrival in November 2007?

(2009,
issue 1)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Aircraft enthusiasts watch from behind the runway fenceline as Emirates airline flight EK207 touches down on runway 24L at Toronto-Pearson airport, ending its 15-hour nonstop run from Dubai. For these enthusiasts, however, watching aircraft is more than just a hobby. These uniformed volunteers are also contributing to the safety and security of a major Canadian airport.

(2008,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY MIKE TODDINGTON

As identified by the Canada Council, competing ports in the U.S. have a much better foundation under which to work. American ports are publicly owned, and port officials are elected locally, therefore, port developments in the local public interest receive grants derived from local taxation. Alternatively, limited human and financial resources continue to present a significant disadvantage for Canadian ports.

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Usually critical of government (in)action on criminal justice and security issues, I was ­uncharacteristically upbeat when asked by FrontLine Security to comment on the state of ­current progress on border security in Canada. Such unusual confidence comes from the simple but unmistakable fact that – despite all the foot dragging, doubletalk, cost over­estimates, institutional rivalries and the ‘we’ve always done it that way’ attitudes – progress has been made, and more is clearly on the way.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY LANCE VALCOUR [field_writer2]

Have you ever found yourself, in an emergency, a few hundred yards away from a public safety colleague – police officer, fire fighter, or paramedic – yet unable to transmit vital information to him or her? It happens all too often. Radio systems, cell phones, PDAs, and other devices are not always configured, aligned or even designed to allow inter-agency communication. Often the communications are seriously limited by the available technology. At other times, the agencies lack the proper protocols, governance or knowledge of how to communicate with each other.

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Normally, when I’m asked to organize an event, I ensure that the subject matter is something in which I have some expertise. I made an exception to that rule earlier this year when the Conference Board of Canada asked me to put together a program for one of their highly regarded security conferences.

Senator Colin Kenny
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

One of the most knowledgeable and comprehensive examinations of the state of our Maritime Security has been one conducted by the Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence. For the last six years, during its study, it has heard testimony, examined data, held regional hearings and visited our ports. The Committee has twice published its recommendations in ominously titled reports: Canada’s Coastlines The longest undefended borders in the World (2003), and a rather damning update of this initial report, entitled simply Coasts (2007).

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY MIKE TODDINGTON
Has Canada dropped the ball?

Canada has experienced a long and tortuous history of policing our Ports.


At the end of the First World War, the port police in Montreal are believed to have had more than 100 officers but in 1920 they numbered three individuals with limited responsibilty.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY RON MEYERS

The Canadian Standards Association (CSA), and the Canadian General Standards Board (CGSB) as the lead Federal organization, in cooperation with other stakeholders, have begun to collaboratively develop the first Canadian national standard for personal protective equipment for first responders (fire, police, paramedic, and hospital first receivers) in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear (CBRN) incident.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY NORMA REVELER

Radar surveillance systems have long been proven to be effective security tools in military applications – and now are affordable enough to be used by homeland security and law enforcement agencies that have tight budgets.


Accipter Radar tracks displayed at Operations Centre

(2007,
issue 2)
BY JAY C. HOPE [field_writer2]
Practical Advice from Ontario’s Commissioner of Community Safety

Natural disasters can strike with ­little or no notice, causing large numbers of casualties and devastating local infrastructure. Impacts may include widespread power outages, road closures that block emergency response efforts, building collapses and structure fires. As the Com­missioner of Community Safety for Ontario and a for­mer Deputy Com­missioner of the Ontario Provincial Police, I know that within moments of a natural disaster striking, response resources and management systems can be stressed to the limit.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY DOUG SILVER [field_writer2] and CAROL-LYNN CHAMBERS

Heavy Urban Search and Rescue (HUSAR) teams are multi-disciplinary in nature. Personnel and equipment used by these teams can be deployed locally, provincially, and across Canada to provide the specialized search and rescue to free and recover trapped victims.


Toronto HUSAR team members work to remove heavy debris and secure safe positions within a collapsed structure.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MARK GILES

Set between the Rhone River and the “Parc Tete d’Or” in Lyon, France – about an hour’s drive southwest of the Swiss border – is a rather unique looking building. As some of its security features become visible to the casual passer-by, including marked police vehicles and uniformed officers at the entrance, some might wonder what purpose it serves.


The General Secretariat in Lyon, France, serves as Interpol headquarters.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY JENI SANDEMAN [field_writer2]

The RCMP is one of many key organizations taking potential health threats seriously, and as such, has been working closely with federal, provincial, territorial and municipal health, government and emergency partners.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

I am very pleased to launch FRONTLINE SECURITY in the wake of the change in our national Government. One of the elements that we believe was called for in this change is a clearer and more knowledgeable debate of broader national security issues and their impact on our well-being and democratic society. Our magazine has been designed to offer such a national voice to this debate in a more security-conscious Canadian society. Just as Julian Fantino says of Emergency Preparedness in his interview in this issue, our own magazine is also “a work in progress.”