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(2017,

 

As reported in "The Independent"
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/smoking-out-the-cowboy-indians-a7494456.html

With Donald Trump only weeks away from his inauguration, talk of walls along the Mexican border have – for the moment at least – fallen from the agenda. But another border is fast becoming a problem.

(2017,

Food Safety an issue for Canadians says a report card released today from SeaChoice – a collaboration between the Ecology Action Centre, David Suzuki Foundation and Living Oceans Society.

Canada’s seafood labelling requirements fail consumers, particularly when compared to requirements governing two of our largest export partners, the European Union and the United States, notes the document.

(2017,

The House of Commons committee on the status of women has recommended that all RCMP members and judges receive mandatory training about gender-based violence and sexual assault.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY GREG FYFFE

The Canadian Association of Security and Intelligence Studies (CASIS) recently held a Symposium entitled “The Cyber Challenge.” Although the speakers focused on the national and international, and non-criminal aspects of the threat, the implications for those on the front lines of public safety are unmistakable.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JAMES NORRIE and STEPHANIE NESBITT
Into the Cyber Breach Go the U.S. Government Regulators

Has cybersecurity evolved to become a true profession, with a requirement for regulatory standards? If so, who will make those decisions? Cyber security efforts clearly fulfill an undeniably critical function in contributing to protection of our ever-expanding global online world, and in this article, we argue that recent U.S. court decisions signal the global arrival of the cybersecurity profession at an important crossroads.

Data Breach

One Last Thing
(2016,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

The issue of national security oversight and review has re-emerged following the recent scathing judgement of M. Justice Noel (2016 FC 1105) regarding CSIS’ deliberate cover up of its ‘metadata’ gathering and retention of personal information of Canadians.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH

The Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) recently sponsored a conference entitled "Are We Prepared?" April, 2016.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

After years of talk but little action from its predecessors, it appears that the new Canadian Government is recognizing that if we want to preserve the sovereignty of our vast Arctic territory we need to do more than have politicians use the phrase ‘from sea to sea to sea’ when describing Canada.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

When the new Government assumed office after the 2015 election, it was clear that they had new policy priorities and that they were specifically intent on a more inclusive and consultative process for decision making than their predecessor. Some sceptics, myself included, cautioned that while this was understandable, governing is about making choices and taking action, and not simply holding media events to celebrate ‘inclusion’ and ‘outreach’. Put differently, governing is more difficult than campaigning, and it’s what Governments are elected to do.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

The recent summit of the “three amigos” – hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and involving U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto – brought considerable excitement to the Ottawa area. The wide ranging topics discussed and agreements signed during the short 1-day event are a testament to the strength of the relationships.

SPECIAL REPORT
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

THE 360° APPROACH

(2016,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

They’re the issues that won’t go away. First raised by FrontLine Security in 2011, following the 2010 Air India report recommendations, the issues of improving national security operational oversight and after-the-fact reviews resurfaced during the C-51 debate and the 2015 election.

(2016,
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Security Review issues are in the news… and that's a good thing.

The issue of the conduct of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and the Canadian Security Establishment (CSE), and the effectiveness of the independent review agencies overseeing them, was front and centre in the news last week. The reason was the curiously concurrent tabling of the Annual Reports by Public Safety Minister Goodale, from the CSE Commissioner, and from the Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIRC) which oversees CSIS.

(2016,

Senator Bob Runciman has introduced a bill in the Senate to ensure judges have all the facts before they release violent or habitual criminals on bail.

Bill S-217, introduced on February 3rd, requires the prosecutor to make it known at the bail hearing if the accused has a criminal record, is currently facing other criminal charges or has failed to appear in court in the past. This may result in repeat offenders not getting any pre-trial credit at sentencing when they are deservedly denied bail because of their record.

(2016,

Senator Bob Runciman is pushing the federal government to institute a scholarship fund for the families of federal public safety officers killed in the line of duty.

In a statement in the Senate last week, Runciman urged Finance Minister Bill Morneau to put the measure in his upcoming budget.

(2016,

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Canada's Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, and the Honourable John McCallum, Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, met with their counterparts from Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States during the Five Country Ministerial Meeting and Quintet of Attorneys General.
 

(2016,

Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale has issued a statement on the review of workplace harassment within the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). This is the full text of his statement:

"The Prime Minister has given me a clear mandate to ensure that the RCMP is a healthy workplace, free from harassment and sexual violence.

(2016,

The Director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), Michel Coulombe, appeared this week before the Senate Committee on National Security and Defence to discuss the current security environment, and the evolving threat to Canada posed by terrorism.

Following his appearance, he issued the following statement:

(2016,

The Government of Canada has introduced legislation to create a new labour relations regime for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) members and reservists.

The legislation would address the Supreme Court of Canada decision on the Mounted Police Association of Ontario (MPAO) v. Attorney General of Canada case, which found key parts of the current RCMP labour relations regime to be unconstitutional.

(2016,

In PMO news today, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau commented on the retirement of his National Security Advisor, Richard Fadden, who retires after 39 years of public service. The PM also announced the appointment of a new Deputy Clerk of the Privy Council and Associate Secretary to Cabinet. 

Serge Dupont, currently the Executive Director for the Canadian, Irish, and Caribbean constituency at the International Monetary Fund, will undertake this role effective May 9, 2016.

 

(2016,

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, yesterday issued the following statement on the reappointment of the Correctional Investigator of Canada:

(2016,

 

Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement yesterday following an on-duty incident that led to the death of Vancouver Island RCMP Constable Sarah Beckett:

“On behalf of all Canadians, I would like to express my deepest condolences to the family, friends, and colleagues of RCMP Constable Sarah Beckett, who was killed in an on-duty auto collision this morning. Our thoughts and prayers are with her family and loved ones during this incredibly difficult time.

(2016,

 

By Eric Baculinao, NBC News
 
China has unveiled a proposal for a $50 trillion global electricity network that would help fight pollution and the effects of climate change.

The plan envisions linking existing and future solar farms, wind turbines and electricity plants in Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas, according to the head of State Grid Corporation of China.

(2016,

Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, has announced that Canada will host the Fifth Regional Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction in the Americas in 2017. This meeting will bring together some 1,000 delegates from over 50 member states in the Americas to discuss opportunities for collaboration and coordination in meeting shared objectives to reduce disaster risks in the region and to meet the United Nations’ Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030) commitments.

(2016,

 

The Government of Canada is committed to enhance compensation benefits for public safety officers who are permanently disabled or killed in the line of duty. This includes the creation of a public safety officers compensation benefit for firefighters, police officers and paramedics. In listening to representatives from the three public safety officer groups, the Government of Canada will better understand their compensations needs.

(2016,

 

The Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Status of Women, today hosted an informative gender-focused discussion with experts in various related fields as part of public consultations taking place across the country to inform a new defence policy for Canada.

Meeting participants included academics and subject matter experts from a variety of non-governmental organizations, including the Institute for Inclusive Security and the White Ribbon Campaign.

Today’s discussion focused on five main points:

(2016,

Ottawa will spend $35 million over five years to fund programs that reach out to vulnerable people open to radicalization in a bid to prevent terror attacks in Canada.

The federal government is looking to establish national centers for de-radicalization across Canada to fight extremism.

Last week’s events in Strathroy, Ontario, is a good example of why Canada may need to establish ways of preventing radicalization.

(2016,

Backgrounder, as provided by the Embassy for Turkey in Canada:

"The developments unfolded in Turkey was a bloody coup attempt by a group of plotters in the military, linked to the Fethullah Gülen Terrorist Organization (FETÖ), to overthrow the democratically-elected Government and the constitutional order in Turkey.

(2016,

 

The Government of Canada is inviting Canadians to participate in a constructive dialogue on our national security framework. This broad consultation is intensifying today with the publication of a discussion paper to prompt debate and input.

(2016,

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, today issued the following statement after speaking at the Canadian Volunteer Fire Services Association annual general meeting:

Today I had the opportunity to extend my deep appreciation for the vital roles that volunteer fire fighters play in keeping Canadians safe. We recently experienced our volunteers’ determination and resiliency during the wildfire firefighting efforts in Fort McMurray this spring; their commitment to public service is remarkable.

(2016,

After the body of Inuit artist Annie Pootoogook was found in the Ottawa River, Sgt Chris Hrnchiar of the OPS forensic identification unit made some online remarks that now have him under internal investigation. Still on the job, Hrnchiar could face loss of pay, demotion, suspension or dismissal.

(2016,

 

Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement on the anniversary of 9/11 and the National Day of Service:

The terrible events of September 11, 2001, which took the lives of 3,000 innocent people, including 24 Canadians, represent a senseless tragedy which we must never forget.

The attacks were an affront to our democratic society, and compelled us to strengthen our resolve and collaboration with international partners to defend our values and freedoms.

(2016,

 

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement after the tabling of the 2015-16 Annual Report of the Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIRC) last week:

“Over the past year, SIRC conducted nine reviews of activities carried out by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) on topics such as information-sharing, threat reduction activities, and operations abroad including foreign fighter investigations.

(2016,

 

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement today acknowledging the United Nation’s International Day for Disaster Reduction.

"This week we witnessed the effects of large-scale flooding in Nova Scotia, particularly in Cape Breton, as well as in Newfoundland and Labrador. Residents in these areas have demonstrated resilience and community spirit as they continue to come together to help neighbors.

(2016,

Does the anti-terrorism legislation turn CSIS into a secret police force, free to break laws and violate Canadians' rights as it sees fit?

(2016,

Experts are meeting today and tomorrow at Carleton University to discuss “the challenges of dealing with natural resource development projects and activism" - or, in the words of one participant, how to protect Canada's infrastructure from "domestic extremists".

(2016,

 

The Honourable Stéphane Dion, Minister of Foreign Affairs, the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, and the Honourable Harjit Sajjan, Minister of National Defence, have announced that the Government of Canada has deployed the Canadian Disaster Assessment Team (CDAT) to Haiti and set aside up to $3 million as an initial humanitarian response for those in Haiti and other countries in the region affected by Hurricane Matthew.

(2016,

Each year, the Chief Public Health Officer of Canada release a report on the state of public health in this country. This year, he has chosen to focus on family violence in Canada:

Family violence is not just about physical abuse. It comes in many forms, including sexual, emotional and financial abuse, as well as neglect.

The statistics are staggering:

In Canada, every day, just over 230 Canadians are reported as victims of family violence.

(2016,

 

Last week, federal, provincial and territorial (FPT) ministers responsible for justice and public safety concluded two days of productive engagement, working on justice and public safety priorities for Canadians.

An Elder welcomed ministers to traditional Mi'kmaw territory.

(2016,

Jim Carr, the federal natural resources minister says his government will use police and military forces for ensure opposition to new pipelines remains peaceful. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and Line 3 replacement both received approval Tuesday.

(2016,

In 2012, CSIS knew exactly where John Maguire was before he left Canada to join ISIS in Syria, where he reportedly died fighting in 2015. Six months later, the RCMP was still trying to trace his movements.

(2016,

 

The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National of Defence, yesterday made the following statement about the truck attack that killed four Israeli solders in Jerusalem:

“As a partner, friend and ally of Israel, Canada fully supports the right of Israelis to live in peace and security, free from the threat of terrorism and incitement to violence.

“Canada condemns this terrorist attack that targeted Israel’s defence forces and expresses our deepest condolences to the victims and their families.”

(2015,
issue 3)
BY VIKRAM KULKARNI
Significant contributions by real people

Globally, Canadians have earned a reputation as devoted humanitarians. As one of the most secure countries in the world, Canada, for the most part, enjoys sufficient flows of capital, labour, goods and services. The evolution of ‘Human Security’ practices is directly related to the values of democracy, tolerance, dignity, and respect.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

In the immediate aftermath of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, one of the most important realizations by Government was that a society’s crime vulnerabilities were likely national security vulnerabilities with potentially enormously dangerous consequences. 

(2015,
issue 3)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

No doubt there is much pressure to re-examine on your election pledge regarding Canada’s role in the fight against ISIS and we at FrontLine add our voice to this request, ­particularly in light of recent and escalating events.

Critical Infrastructure
(2015,
issue 2)
BY PHILIP J. BOYLE

Despite its ambitious mission, will the revived National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure be able to sidestep long-standing problems associated with private sector ownership of critical infrastructure and the limits of emergency management in a federal system that may undermine it’s effectiveness while also raising fresh questions regarding the strategic concept of resilience?

RCMP members at risk
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE

Right on the heels of the Independent Review into the Moncton Shooting, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) suffered another violent gun attack on their stretched line of ­operational officers – this time near ­Edmonton – killing Const. David Wynn, and seriously injuring an unarmed Auxiliary officer.

One Last Thing
(2015,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

One of the most alarming aspects of the recent and growing terrorism attacks within domestic Western societies is their Islamist ideological motivation and the assurances from the bad guys that there will be more to come. The people who ‘lead’ these death cults have also figured out that they can advance their perceived cause by inspiring and instructing susceptible people in those same Western countries not simply to travel abroad to join them but rather to commit their horrific crimes in their own neighbourhoods so as to generate maximum fear value.

(2015,

(March 2008) The UK has published the first annual update of the National Security Strategy which sets out an updated assessment of the national security threats facing the UK and includes proposals for combating threats to cyber security.

(2015,

(February 2009) The Canadian Society for Senior Engineers (CSSE) ranks the various Canadian Aerospace program areas, and makes strong recommendations to the Government of Canada. Included among them is a call to increase R&D funding in these areas.

(2015,

(April 28, 2009) In this address to the Canadian Airports Council, Derek Burney, former Ambassador to the US and CDFAI Senior Research Fellow, argues that in the midst of this global recession and time of uncertainty for geopolitical institutions such as NATO and the G8, Canada must reinvigorate its relationship with the United States if it is to have meaningful global influence).

(2015,

(Fall 2009) Public Safety Canada is responsible for coordinating the management of emergencies among federal departments and agencies. This includes establishing policies and programs for the preparation, testing and exercising, and implementing emergency management plans; monitoring and coordinating a common federal approach to emergency response along with the provinces – an "all-hazards" approach incorporating prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery; and coordinating the protection of critical infrastructure.

(2015,

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan yesterday launched the annual Halifax International Security Forum by underscoring the timely importance of bringing together key defence leaders to discuss a number of pressing global security issues.

(2015,

(Jan 2010) There are a number of reasons why France has not suffered a terrorist attack in more than a decade. One reason is due to the successes of the country's experienced and well-established counterterrorism apparatus.

(2015,

(July 2009) A review of terrorism trends, incidents, and landmark court cases. (Foundation for the Defense of Democracy, Center for Terrorism Research)

(2015,
By the Terrorism Research Initiative

(Vol 9, No 5, 2015) This open access journal in the field of terrorism- and counter-terrorism studies offers numerous peer-reviewed articles on the topic of terrorism.

(2015,

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau launchs a new era in Canada federal politics as his majority Liberal government takes office. A cabinet of political veterans and rookie MPs was sworn in today. See the list.

(2015,

With gun violence in the United States at epidemic proportions, a group of the nation’s top constitutional scholars, organized by the American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS), sent a letter to the White House calling on President Obama to take executive action to curb gun violence. 

The law professors note there are numerous actions the administration can take which are fully consistent with the constitutional limitations on the President’s power, which preserve the Second Amendment rights of Americans, while reducing gun violence and saving lives. 

(2014,
issue 3)
BY THE MOUNTED POLICE PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CANADA
MPs Called to Speak Out Now

Elected officials are being called upon to speak up immediately in the House of Commons and Senate with concerns about Enhancing Royal Canadian Mounted Police Accountability Act (Bill C-42) as details emerge about regulations being drafted which would see RCMP members facing a Code of Conduct investigation having fewer rights than other Canadians charged with crimes.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER
Why One Veteran Firefighter is Being Targeted By His Union

Providing adequate fire protection services for citizens in smaller municipalities throughout the vast Canadian landscape creates obvious financial challenges. In fact, many are currently looking at options to lessen the costs of providing all forms of emergency services. Most of these smaller towns and villages lack the resources to maintain a fire department comprised entirely of professional firefighters, as is the standard in major urban centres.

One Last Thing
(2014,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

Like beauty, a covert security threat is often defined through the eye of the beholder. As such, it’s probably time to modernize what we consider as threats, and recognize that traditional statesponsored ‘espionage’, wherein military or political secrets are acquired, no longer uniquely defines the issue.


“Perceived increased corporate profit is not a substitute for public security.”

(2014,
issue 2)
BY DR PAULA STEWART

“A Healthy and Active society is a Secure society.”
This outcome depends on the availability and support for training, education and physical fitness and the availability of proper employment, remuneration and accommodation for all.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

Questions are being asked – yet again – about the federal government’s procurement processes after it was confirmed that Bell Helicopter Textron Canada (BHTC) of Mirabel, Quebec, has effectively been sole-sourced to supply one fleet of Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) light-lift helicopters, despite an ongoing lawsuit, and is likely to be awarded the ­contract to renew a second medium-lift CCG helicopter fleet.

(2014,
issue 1)
BY KEN POLE

The path to a truly coordinated transatlantic defence and security policy is littered with challenges. Despite a perception that North American security interests are shifting increasingly to the Pacific Rim, there was evident agreement among attendees of an inaugural symposium on European Union-Canada Cooperation in Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP) that preserving the long-standing transatlantic accord should remain a priority to like-minded nations.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY KEN POLE

Transport Canada issued a “protective direction” on November 20th, requiring the major railway companies to provide detailed information on their cargoes to municipalities and first responders – but the quarterly and annual reports will only cover what had been shipped in the previous three months and 12 months, respectively. At best, it would give municipalities and first responders a feel for what has already gone through their jurisdictions, not what’s coming (somewhat akin to closing the stable door after the horse has bolted).

Interview: Dr Michael Kempa
(2013,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Dr Michael Kempa is an Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Ottawa, and a freelance journalist who enjoys diving into the messy reality of the politics and economics of policing and security. Editor Clive Addy talks to him about the current situation of rising costs without the benefit of rising budgets.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY SIMON SMITH

By getting serious about the problem of contraband tobacco, there are numerous benefits for Governments including to the population's health and national coffers. It's time that collectively we stop taking dated approaches of continually increasing taxes that only prompt further black market activity and approach the subject anew.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY
Do Unsecure Communications Put Officers at Risk?

During the manhunt for the suspected Boston Marathon bombers in April, hundreds of thousands of people listened to police radio communications live over the Internet as hobbyists rebroadcast messages. Listeners then passed on information via Twitter, so that hundreds of thousands more learned how the hunt was proceeding from their computers, iPhones and BlackBerries, in very close to real time.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

As we embark on 2013, it is timely to reflect on the state of the various components of the security sector in Canada including to note progress made and action required. To do that, it’s helpful to reflect on that which happened in 2012…and that which didn’t because for both reasons it was a year of great significance for safety and security issues in Canada. This factual analysis will also demonstrate what needs action now.

Editor's Corner
(2012,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Frontline Security continues its thrust to influence national security policies – to enable citizens, first responders and government officials to protect Canadians as we would expect in today’s world. One of the major determinants of this world is the rise in overall influence, for good and bad, of the cyber presence. This edition includes many articles on technology and the sharing of information to elicit better responses to safety and security challenges.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

View PDF

The Strategy for a National EMS Culture of Safety asserts that "Emergency medical service (EMS) provider organizations nationwide potentially expose patients, practitioners and members of the public to preventable risk of serious harm, in contrast with advances in safety practices that have been broadly implemented in many other healthcare settings in recent years."

(2011,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

National security is threatened where political spies operate. Threats from political espionage have plagued sovereign nations from the beginning and over time have generated a class of foreign diplomacy where luxury lifestyles are filled with missions of intrigue and paid informants. As Lt.-Col. Paul M. Thobo-Carlsen reminds us, the spy game is the second oldest profession in the world!

(2011,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

The worlds of information technology and international commerce are ­inextricably intertwined. As private and public sector organizations reach out to the world – either in the same community or across the globe, they rely on their Information Technology environments to enable their business to succeed.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY MICHEL JUNEAU-KATSUYA

Corporate espionage is linked to national security – in fact the concepts are tightly intertwined. Our national security is linked to our state secrets but it is the R&D and economic activities of companies that produces those sensitive intellectual property that is sought after by those who wish to gain any corporate advantage. With its knowledge-based society and cutting edge technology research centres, Canada and its companies ­represent a very attractive ­playground where international competitors can come to steal that R&D.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

Similar to most threats to our public safety and national security, port security involves fundamental principles for staying safe from either natural disruptions or actions by criminals and terrorists. Response, Recovery and Resilience are well known common principles upon which to structure the security of ports, build programs and develop systems to suit the ­specific environment.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

“There is a new world emerging above the Arctic Circle. It is this world, a new world for all the peoples of the Arctic regions that we in Canada are working to build”
– Stephen Harper, August 2008, Inuvik, NWT

(2011,
issue 1)

In the first week following Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s ousting from office, the residents of Cairo celebrated the promise of a new and democratic state. In a country that has known a central government for 6000 years, the aftermath of the February Revolution marks the first time in Egypt’s political history that the people may have the opportunity to elect their own leader. In this crucial and delicate post-revolutionary phase, the military’s Supreme Council of the Armed Forces has taken control of the country.

(2011,
Published by by the Henry Jackson Society and tThe Centre for Social Cohesion

(July 2011) Islamic extremism is not the only terrorist threat to the United Kingdom, but it remains far and away the greatest, and the least predictable. This report provides insight into the background and history of Islamism-related terrorism in the UK over the past 20 years. Its research means that even more can be understood about the dangers Islamic terrorism and extremism have brought and still threaten British citizens and UK government assets, at home and abroad.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY WILLIAM F. MacKAY
From a Vision to Reality

A few months ago, the concept of a nationwide Canadian emergency management network was just that – a concept, a dream. Today, ­Partnerships Towards Safer Communities Online (PTSC-Online) is a reality. Its growing membership has a good grasp on current issues facing Canadian emergency managers and are deriving value from their participation in this program.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY TYSON MACAULAY
Metrics-Based Assessment and Policy Indications

Most research into Critical Infrastructure Interdepen­dency (CII) is based upon ad hoc observations, anecdotes and partial incident-accounts which describe some but not all Critical Infrastructure (CI) sectors and their conditions after the incident. ­Metrics-based systems for understanding, mapping and modeling of CII have been evolving slowly.  

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In a recent book entitled Tainted Money, author Avi Jorisch states: ‘As Washington reaches out to financial and foreign ministries around the globe, policymakers and laymen alike should be keenly aware of the financial dangers we will need to counter – whether they stem from rouge regimes like Iran and North Korea, the Osama bin Laden’s of the world, or criminals that are engaged in illicit activity.

One Last Thing
(2010,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

This issue of FrontLine Security provides a fascinating look into the full spectrum of financial issues in the security and crime investigation worlds. These subjects are frequently overlooked especially by our increasingly sound byte-driven media and political decision makers.

Lt-General Michael Jeffery
(2010,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY
Canada Must Face the Potential for Domestic and Global Threats!

(2010,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT WRIGHT

Have you thought about your “digital shadow” recently? Whether you’ve thought about it or not, yours is probably growing. Unless you were born in a barn and live off the land, it’s hard not to have a digital footprint these days.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS and DOUG HALES

Effective Understanding for Decision-Making
We can see from the definitions offered in Part 1 of this article (see Winter 2009/2010 edition) that an “effective understanding” of the Maritime Domain must come from a knowledge of the facts -- whether they originate from geo-spatial surveillance and reconnaissance data or intelligence analysis and assessment.

(2010,

This Special Report, authored by Athol Yates and Anthony Bergin argues that it's time for Defence to more fully incorporate domestic disaster assistance tasks as part of its core business. Defence is likely to be used more frequently in the future to assist in domestic disaster management. There will be larger and more frequent extreme weather events with a growing community and political expectation to use military resources to support whole-of-government counter-disaster efforts.
Three key actions should be taken:

(2010,

(Sept 2010) This report, authored by Carl Ungerer, highlights the major changes to Australia?s national security institutions since 2008. The paper argues that despite several years of reform, the institutional design for national security policy-making as a whole remains dominated by centralisation and limited coordination.

Editor's Corner
(2009,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

We need a National Security Policy with teeth, now. Particularly its Emergency ­Preparedness and Critical Infrastructure ­Protection elements, and one which allies, neighbours, businesses, provinces and municipalities can, with confidence, know is indeed protecting our citizens and resources reliably… as most, incorrectly, expect we now do.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS
Emergency Preparedness in Barrie

Catastrophe struck on 31 May 1985, in the form of a devastating blast from Mother Nature. A tornado ravaged the busy community of Barrie – providing what current Mayor Dave Aspden describes as his city’s wakeup call. The CBC later tallied the devastation to this city of 128,000: Eight lives lost, 155 injuries, 300 homes destroyed, and more than $100 million in damages.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY DR WAYNE BOONE

Introduction

(2009,
issue 2)
BY DAVID GEWIRTZ

Highway 99, the Sea-to-Sky Highway, runs from ­Vancouver to Squamish along the Howe Sound on the way to Whistler, and is one of my favorite drives in all of North America. For 17 days this coming February, the Sea-to-Sky Highway is going to be swamped with millions of travelers traversing the 120 miles from Olympic venues in Vancouver to the slopes in Whistler.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY JEZ LITTLEWOOD

Canada is a safe, stable, secure democracy. That is not to say that Canada faces no challenges to its security, but as the 2007-2008 annual report of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) states, the number of actual terrorist incidents in Canada has been minimal over the last few years. Nothing similar to September 11, 2001 has occurred since that date, and it has been over two decades since the tragic Air India bombing that originated in Canada.

(2009,
By the Government of Canada

(July 2009) Canada's Northern Strategy focuses on four priority areas: exercising our Arctic sovereignty; promoting social and economic development; protecting the North's environmental heritage; and improving and devolving northern governance, so that Northerners have a greater say in their own destiny.

(2009,

(June 2009) The security of the UK and its citizens remains the highest priority for the Government. Since publication of last year?s National Security Strategy, substantial work to strengthen our national security framework has been driven forward. This report updates an assessment of the threats faced in the UK and the underlying drivers of insecurity. It also announces plans for addressing changing security threats in long-established environments and tackling challenges in new and evolving domains such as cyberspace.

(2009,
The World Bank

(Jan 2009) Grim descriptions of the long‐term consequences of climate change have given the impression that the climate impacts from greenhouse gases threaten long‐ term economic growth. However, the impact of climate change on the global economy is likely to be quite small over the next 50 years. Severe impacts even by the end of the century are unlikely. The greatest threat that climate change poses to long‐term economic growth is from potentially excessive near‐term mitigation efforts.

(2009,

(June 2009) In the preparation of the new Australian white paper on counter-terrorism, this policy analysis, authored by Anthony Bergin, recommends a wide array of policy measures.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Putting this Border Security edition together, in the wake of the world-wide recession, increased tension in the Middle East, and much turbulence in both Canada and the U.S. over government regimes, was indeed a wonderfully stimulating challenge. Yet, it turns out, the real challenge remains to secure our borders without isolating ourselves (which would reduce our chances of mutual prosperity)… the same issue we have tackled for over 50 years.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS A. TASS

From 1990, travel restrictions out of the post communist states almost evaporated. Simultaneously entry restrictions were significantly eased in the U.S., Canada and most western European countries.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our common border with the United States stretches across 8,893 kilometers (5,526 miles) of land and three oceans. According to Gov­ernment of Canada statistics, the annual two-way trade in goods and services between Canada and the U.S. in 2007 was worth over C$576 billion. Clearly, border security is a vital component of our ­economic security.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ANGUS SMITH

Should we have been surprised by the terrorist siege of Mumbai? Probably not.
In a January 2005 article in The Atlantic, former White House security official Richard A. Clarke posited an “alternate future” for the post-9/11 decade. Clarke chronicled a series of terrorist attacks on the US homeland. The first wave consisted of simultaneous assaults on hotels and amusement parks; the second of a series of carefully planned shooting and bombing rampages in America’s largest shopping malls. In both ­scenarios, thousands died.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY JILL OLEN

Natural and man-made disasters don’t recognize political boundaries; the path of a radiological plume will not respect a port of entry. Border communities share many of the same concerns, but there are also some unique conditions that require innovative initiatives from multiple partners. Increased security requirements have heightened ­tensions at the borders that prior to 9/11/01 were easily resolved with local cooperation.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

As our renewed government faces new and major economic readjustments on a global scale, I am pleased to present this issue on Cyber Security.  


Constable Les Gramantik, of the Firearms Training Unit, demonstrates the new rifle power. (Photo courtesy of the Calgary Police Service)

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS

In their November 2007 report entitled, A Resilient Canada: Governance for National Security and Public Safety, by Trevor Munn-Venn and Andrew Archibald, the Conference Board of Canada has produced an insightful analysis of how Canadians formulate and implement governance in their national security and public safety ­organizations. Interestingly, after interviewing public and private sector leaders and experts in this subject area, the Board found that the greatest threat to national security perceived by these experts is “a lack of clarity around governance.”

(2007,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS QUIGGIN

One comment currently being heard in British Columbia is that the upcoming 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics will be “a sporting event, not a security event.”

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In this our Fall issue, we have chosen to focus on Canada’s Maritime Security – ­primarily because of concerns following recent Senate Committee reports, and the obvious impact that a continued lack of reasonable maritime security would have on our safety and prosperity.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS
Canadian Maritime Domestic Security

National Security – The Sea Matters
Over the last six years, in the changed global security environment, Canadians have learned that National Security is a modern imperative that requires profound thought, development, investment, resourcing, and, most of all, government leadership and action. The new threat environment includes globalized threats such as terrorism, multi-national crime organizations, disease epidemics, and ­natural disasters – not simply traditional, state-oriented threats.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY SUNIL RAM

In the wake of independence in 1962, Algeria came under the growing authoritarian governance of the socialist National Liberation Front (FLN). Tensions exploded in 1988 when a series of youth riots, which left over 500 dead, set off a new Islamic revolt in Algeria. The government subsequently acquiesced to the first multiparty election, however, when the Islamic Salvation Front (Front Islamique du Salut – FIS) won a round of parliamentary elections for local councils in 1990, the FLN changed the electoral laws so it could win in the future.

Editor's Corner
(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Our winter Borders and Biometrics edition was very timely.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY DOUG HANCHARD and ERIC RASMUSSEN

Many FrontLine readers are directly responsible for emergency preparedness within their community, region, or nation. We recognize that our preparations for catastrophe are based on our education and research, our best thinking about specific areas, and how best to use our (always limited) resources.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY

The theme of this issue is very pertinent as it follows on the heels of recent ­pronouncements by Prime Minister Harper in Vancouver this summer and by U.S. President Bush in September. As part of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, there is need for a great and mutual effort on all sides to ensure the free and expeditious flow of legitimate persons and goods between our two countries. This implies a mutual trust in agreed identification systems for these persons and goods.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY

In this fickle Canada of six-month business plans and two-year governments influenced by the latest polls or stock-market prices, and where “second quarter results” are used as an indication of long term profitability, and “reality” TV is ­distracting us from the dangerously true reality, are we ready for a necessary, ­difficult and prolonged commitment to... anything? Is there the pragmatic ­realization that we are now at war… really?

(2006,
issue 3)
BY TIM PAGE

There is no more important role for government than the security of its homeland and the safety of its citizens.

While government is ultimately accountable for a nation’s safety, it is by no means exclusively responsible for it. The private sector shares this responsibility and must be an integral contributor to the government’s national security framework for the ­following three reasons:

(2006,
issue 3)
BY PETER HILLIER

Outsourcers have a responsibility to protect client data regardless of where it flows or is stored – as is certainly highlighted by a barrage of client data security breaches of late.

Editor's Corner
(2006,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Over four and a half years have passed since 9/11, over two since the creation of Canada’s Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, over two from the Madrid train bombings, and nearly one since the London subway attacks. Spurred into action by these horrific events, over $9.5 billion was announced by the past government in our first National Security Policy, aimed at improving the overall security of Canadians.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY DR UGIS BICKIS

Beware of an alarming illiteracy in Canada! This problem is evident among health officials tasked with protecting the public. It appears that they have not read, or possibly not understood, the science – we know they have disregarded it. Their lack of understanding is egregious. They also have not called upon the cadre of professionals who are well versed in the science and art of protecting people from disease, particularly airborne disease.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY JAMES COX

Some analysts have noted inadequacies in certain Canadian national security strategies. The fault may lie elsewhere. Any strategy, no matter how robust and well thought out, will not be fully effective in a policy vacuum, because strategy is derived from policy, or at least it should be. Without a sound policy to provide guidance and context, strategy is like the Maple Leafs at the end of the regular hockey season – lots of activity, but going nowhere.

Interview: Julian Fantino
(2006,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Almost one year after his appointment as Commissioner of Emergency Manage­ment for the Province of Ontario, Clive Addy, FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, interviewed Julian Fantino about his thoughts on Security and Emergency Management.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS

When Securing an Open Society: Canada’s National Security Policy was promulgated in April 2004, the authors billed it as a “strategic framework and action plan.” It is not a national security strategy. In fact, it would seem that the Canadian government did not feel an urgent need for a national security strategy. Rather, they often seemed to leave this sort of thinking to the U.S. government in the context of North American security strategy.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER

In the aftermath of this past summer’s July 7th Al Qaeda terrorist attacks in London, Canada must move rapidly to adopt an integrated counter-terrorism strategy before it is too late.

(2006,

(December 2006) This report uses the National Identity Scheme to strengthen borders of the United Kingdom and enforce compliance within the UK.