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(2017,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MARTHA J. LAGUARDIA-KOTITE
Newest flagships enhance National Security

It is July 2013 and U.S. Coast Guard deck hands take in the mooring lines aboard Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a Legend-class National Security Cutter. Stratton slowly drifts away from the San Diego pier, sounding three short blasts to alert nearby maritime traffic that the 418-foot steel vessel was backing out. The engines shift, increasing speed ahead, and USCGC Stratton is outbound for sea.

(2017,
issue 1)
[field_writer2]
Maritime Extended Border Security

The USCG is currently part of the Department of Homeland Security and is also part of the Department of Defense, through Title X of the National Defense Act. It is a hybrid agency that works maritime security in the broad sense of the word – from the low end to the higher end of the threat environment.

(2017,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY J. PRAKASH
(Malaysia, Indonesia and Philippines)

Malaysian authorities recently announced the violent death of Al-Habisi – a key ring leader of the violent terror group called Abu Sayyaf.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

As reported in "The Independent"
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/smoking-out-the-cowboy-indians-a7494456.html

With Donald Trump only weeks away from his inauguration, talk of walls along the Mexican border have – for the moment at least – fallen from the agenda. But another border is fast becoming a problem.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

(français ci-dessous)

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers at the Pigeon River and Rainy River ports of entry (POE) seized three undeclared firearms on Canada Day.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

(français ci-dessous)

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) announced today that a Montréal man has been sentenced to 12 months in prison and his trucking company Réno Réal Inc. has been fined $567,645 for attempting to smuggle tobacco into Canada.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

(français ci-dessous)

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) announced today that a seizure of heroin at the John C. Munroe Hamilton International Airport resulted in two arrests.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

(français ci-dessous)

Canadian Armed Forces (CAF) Maritime Coastal Defence Vessels deployed on Operation Caribbe in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean Sea have been working hand-in-hand with the United States Coast Guard (USCG) over the past several weeks to intercept and seize large quantities of illicit drugs.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

The recent summit of the “three amigos” – hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and involving U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto – brought considerable excitement to the Ottawa area. The wide ranging topics discussed and agreements signed during the short 1-day event are a testament to the strength of the relationships.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships (HMCS) Moncton and Summerside departed Halifax today to participate on Operation CARIBBE 2016, marking the start of Canada’s 10th year of contributions to Op MARTILLO - the multinational campaign against transnational criminal organizations in the Pacific Ocean and Caribbean.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

Over the next two days, Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships (HMCS) Brandon, Edmonton and Kingston are departing to participate in Operation Caribbe, Canada’s contribution the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking by transnational criminal organizations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean.

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2015,
[field_writer2]

Her Majesty's Canadian Ships (HMC Ships) Brandon and Whitehorse recently concluded their participation in Operation CARIBBE 2015 with a substantial contribution to the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking in the eastern Pacific Ocean.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]
An Intercontinental Gateway

Much of the “stuff” Canadians have acquired over the past three decades arrived here from Asia in a shipping container. What is important to both the seller and the purchaser is delivery time, which means the logistics governing the movement of containers around the globe serve one key purpose – time to market.

(2014,
[field_writer2] By Homeland Security Research Corporation

(July 2014) Analysts forecast a strong comeback of the X-ray security industry generating a solid 7% CAGR. The growth will be boosted by three main drivers: expansion of the Asia Pacific secured facilities and aviation security markets; the replacement of more than 40,000 outdated X-ray systems; and despite a decade of R&D aiming at new baggage, luggage, cargo and mail screening technologies, there is no modality on the horizon that can competitively challenge the cost-performance of the X-ray based screening technologies.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LEAH WEST SHERRIFF

Though it may be cliché to comment on the way wireless technology has changed the modern world, today, mobile devices allow us to express ourselves through social media in real time, help us navigate our daily lives, enable us to bank, trade, buy and sell on the move, and allow us to carry the internet’s unlimited information resources in our back pocket.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY SIMON SMITH

By getting serious about the problem of contraband tobacco, there are numerous benefits for Governments including to the population's health and national coffers. It's time that collectively we stop taking dated approaches of continually increasing taxes that only prompt further black market activity and approach the subject anew.

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Roots
We have dedicated this issue to Border Security. It is both timely and important that we do so, for we North American neighbours find ourselves at a critical juncture in this more globally accessible and competitive world where we benefit from reasonably stable governments, are blessed by vast territory, rich resources, significantly intertwined economies and secular institutions open to all members of our society.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

As this issue of Frontline Security demonstrates, a critical part of border security is the detection and interdiction of guns and drugs, and now people, that criminals, and possibly worse, are trying to smuggle into Canada. Getting it right in border security is essential because what gets through at the border inevitably ends up on the streets of our communities, and this means more criminal activity and less public safety.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
Courses of Action

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
A Compilation of FrontLine Articles

In the murky world of criminal behaviour and clandestine side deals, there lurks a menace to economic fairness and good government – and this is especially evident in the debate on how to deal with the illicit trade in smokes. Public safety and national security are important social issues that are negatively affected by the prevalence of illicit trade in tobacco in Canada (and the world). The complexity of the contraband tobacco issue has provided much fodder for FrontLine Security’s detailed exposé on the topic over the past year.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from Illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

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Canadians see Mexico on a split screen. On one side, they see a tourist paradise that attracts 1.5 million Canadians every year. On the other: a drug war that has claimed 50,000 lives in five years...


Canadian Military meets with Mexican Army

Chris Lewis
(2011,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The Ontario Provincial Police is led by Commissioner Chris Lewis. With a 32-year career behind him (four of these as Deputy Commissioner), Lewis has significantly contributed to the OPP’s history of successful leadership.

One Last Thing
(2010,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]
Time for a Lesson Learned Analysis

With the latest, but by no means last, chapter now concluded in the long running Omar Khadr saga following his guilty pleas and sentencing, it’s a good idea to reflect on how these events came about and why so we might be able to prevent them in the future.


U.S. Defence Press Operations, Pentagon, on Oct 31, 2010 shows a file photo of Omar Khadr constructing an IED.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In a recent book entitled Tainted Money, author Avi Jorisch states: ‘As Washington reaches out to financial and foreign ministries around the globe, policymakers and laymen alike should be keenly aware of the financial dangers we will need to counter – whether they stem from rouge regimes like Iran and North Korea, the Osama bin Laden’s of the world, or criminals that are engaged in illicit activity.

(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY KIM R MANCHESTER

Innovative South American narco-traffickers have recently expanded their cocaine smuggling repertoire with the use of diesel-electric submarines capable of handling ten-ton loads, replete with conning tower, periscope and air-conditioning. Such stealthy shipping vessels demonstrate clearly that well-funded drug cartels can approach the transportation of their product imaginatively.

(2010,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

If you talk to Alison Redford about what it takes to do her job as Alberta’s Attorney General, her answer isn’t what you would expect from the province’s top lawyer. Crime rates have eased since she was appointed in 2008 but Attorney General Redford would not attribute this success to any one development alone. And, she makes the point that getting tough on crime takes more than just getting tough – it takes getting smart.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

For six generations, approximately 95 percent of the Canada-US border was undefended; official crossing points were the chief exception. The boundary between our nation and the United States spans 6,416 kilometres – 2,878 km on land and 3,538 km on water – and includes terrain that is flat, hilly, and mountainous, vast tracks of prairie and forests, and lakes, rivers, creeks, and marshes. For decades, governments on both sides have tried to curtail smuggling and human trafficking.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

Since before Confederation, the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River and other waterways through which the Canada-U.S. border runs have been maritime freeways used by smugglers. Booze, weapons, cigarettes, drugs and other cargoes such as illegal aliens have been transported between Canada and the United States for decades.  


RCMP Photo

(2008,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS A. TASS [field_writer2]

From 1990, travel restrictions out of the post communist states almost evaporated. Simultaneously entry restrictions were significantly eased in the U.S., Canada and most western European countries.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY BRIAN PHILLIPS [field_writer2]

So often, for those of us who deal daily with the vulnerability of our critical infrastructures, what we do for a living feels like selling insurance to people who are just trying to survive day to day.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Spring issue on Terrorism and Critical Infrastructure Protection ­generated much interest and comment. As we embark on the key trial of Momin Khawaja, the first Canadian-born to be charged under the new ­terrorist legislation, the issues brought up in our last edition by Howie Marsh and Tom Quiggin will surely resonate in the minds of our readers.

Supt Michel Aubin
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In the Drug Situation Report – 2006, the RCMP presented for the first time the troubling fact that: “Within a two year period, Canada has reversed its Ecstasy supply pattern status from an import and ­consumer nation to a major ­production and export country.” ­Continued smuggling of the MDMA precursor chemical MDP2P from China to Canada in 2006 confirmed heightened domestic Ecstasy manufacture.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In our winter issue, we have chosen to examine security for the upcoming 2010 Winter Olympics and have a first glance at how preparations are ­progressing since the official unveiling in September 2006 in Whistler.

(2007,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY DARLENE BLAKELY and RCMP NEWS REPORT

For more than a year and a half, investigators of the Montreal and Halifax RCMP Drug Sections carefully worked out every detail of this international sting operation. Project Chabanel was carried with the Canadian Navy and RCMP liaison officers in England, Morocco, Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates and Spain.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU
Canada-U.S. border partnerships in the St. Lawrence Seaway

On 3 September 2007, at about 6:40 p.m., officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the U.S. Coast Guard spotted an 18-foot boat ­transporting large green plastic bags on the St. Lawrence River. As the authorities approached, the driver abandoned the boat in the water, just off the eastern tip of Cornwall Island, Ontario, and fled on foot.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MARK GILES

Set between the Rhone River and the “Parc Tete d’Or” in Lyon, France – about an hour’s drive southwest of the Swiss border – is a rather unique looking building. As some of its security features become visible to the casual passer-by, including marked police vehicles and uniformed officers at the entrance, some might wonder what purpose it serves.


The General Secretariat in Lyon, France, serves as Interpol headquarters.

(2007,
[field_writer2] U.S. and Canadian Government Report

(2007) This report, published jointly by the U.S. and Canadian governments, examines the current state of illicit drug smuggling across the United States-Canadian border. The report identifies the principal substances which are smuggled in both directions across the border. The authors place special emphasis on the cooperative efforts which law enforcement agencies on both sides of the border engage in and how this has influenced the movement of these illegal substances. (Note: be patient, this link takes a LONG time to load)