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Brave new world, old-school problems
(2017,
issue 3)
BY HELEN OFOSU [field_writer2]

We’ve all heard about the fast-approaching, brave new world where autonomous vehicles and other technology will save us time, trouble, and money. We look forward to private vehicles where we don’t need to focus on the road (many vehicles already feature early stages of this capability). We’ll be able to reclaim countless commuting hours and re-allocate that time to rest, catching up with family, or even productive work. It’s all very exciting, but there are significant risks.

The Key Issue is Security 

(2017,
issue 2)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]

Three decades ago, the Cold War was still raging and conflict between states represented the principal threat to international security and nuclear deterrence was the game. Then came the collapse of the Soviet bloc, the rise of transnational terrorism and the Internet. Fast-forward to today and we have a multitude of security challenges that were never envisioned, from cyber-espionage to super-empowered non-state actors.

(2017,
[field_writer2]

 

Lockheed Martin Canada has partnered with Toronto-based RANK Software to create innovative cyber security solutions for future Canadian and international defence programs.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Police analytics can be extremely valuable in the fight against terrorism and crime. By identifying which events are most likely to escalate, predictive techniques can both improve prevention capability and control costs by deploying officers before escalation and where they are needed most.

(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Police analytics has been gaining more and more attention (which means FrontLine readers will see more on this topic in future editions). When the Ottawa Police Services began looking into it, they identified some 150 police analytics centers in the United States alone.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

Are innovations making cities safer as they get smarter? At a recent conference entitled Smart Cities: Shaping the Future, held in the United Kingdom, experts from all over the world shared their stories of how technology is being applied in their cities to create a safer environment.

Editor's Corner
(2016,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

In 2010 Police Chief magazine published an article titled: “s”. In it, they wrote about the critical role that needs to be played by local law enforcement in proactively preventing terrorism.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY GREG FYFFE [field_writer2]

The Canadian Association for Security and Intelligence Studies held its annual symposium in Ottawa in January 15. The focus

(2016,
issue 1)
BY GREG RICHARDS, MBA, Ph.D, FCMC [field_writer2]

Some readers might remember the 2002 film Minority Report in which an Orwellian future police force would arrest would-be criminals before they committed their crimes.

(2016,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS [field_writer2]

Critical issues loom from a national security, foreign policy and overall security perspective in the long term. The brief, but focused, Speech from the Throne on 4 December 2015 laid out broad parameters and included the new federal government’s position on defence:

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
[field_writer2]

House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence hears from Communications Security Establishment (19 May 2016)
(FrontLine-edited and officially-translated transcript)

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Experts are meeting today and tomorrow at Carleton University to discuss “the challenges of dealing with natural resource development projects and activism" - or, in the words of one participant, how to protect Canada's infrastructure from "domestic extremists".

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2015,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

In the immediate aftermath of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, one of the most important realizations by Government was that a society’s crime vulnerabilities were likely national security vulnerabilities with potentially enormously dangerous consequences. 

(2015,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY FRONTLINE STAFF

Securetech 2015, the public safety, emergency management and security trade show and conference organized by the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI), is moving to Ottawa’s EY Centre, home to the Association’s highly successful annual CANSEC defence trade show. 

(2015,
issue 2)
BY DOUG COOKE [field_writer2]
Cybersecurity Challenges

Critical infrastructures (CI) are essential for managing the services and organizations we rely on. Their ability to function securely and without failure is imperative to the well-being of society at large. For cybercriminals, on the other hand, CI is often viewed as a prime target of malicious intent because of its broad reach and interconnectedness.

(2015,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY NOAM GILUTZ

In today’s global cyber security market, Israel is considered a significant player in both R&D and in sales. This success is evident by the many R&D centers launched in Israel by global giants such as Lockheed-Martin, IBM, EMC, RSA, GE, McAfee, Palo-Alto, VMware, and more. The dozens of new startups being launched are attracting hundreds of millions of dollars in local and global venture capital investments; and Israel’s impressive export levels of cyber security services, now stands at about 5% of the global market.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY JAMES NORRIE [field_writer2]

For generations, academics in the fields of philosophy, linguistics, communications and culture have debated the nuances of metaphor and rhetoric. But for those of us with an interest in the realm of cyber security and its proper practice, perhaps the more important question on which to dwell lies in determining when our use of a metaphor simply becomes the rhetoric?

(2015,
[field_writer2]
(2014,
issue 3)
BY MICHEL JUNEAU-KATSUYA [field_writer2]
Is it Really necessary?

Countering corporate espionage has much more to do with your business culture than bars in the windows, more firewalls, or checking the locks after hours. Given that espionage is mainly perpetrated by insiders, an effective security program hinges on your employees and their buy-in of the security culture.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY MARTIN VERREAULT [field_writer2]

Blogging became popular around 1999 with the arrival of platforms that facilitated publication of content to the web by non-technical users. WordPress was such a platform and quickly became the most popular of its kind with more than 74 million web sites using it today. Although initially created to make blogging easier and convenient, it is used today by organizations of all sizes to manage content for their web sites.

Surveillance-to-Intelligence
(2014,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Great progress has been made since 2007 when Frontline Security first reported on radar surveillance technology designed for use in the homeland by public safety organizations, whose responsibilities include border security, search and rescue, transportation security, and law enforcement.


Typical radar node.

(2014,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY NATHANIEL BOWLER
Only as Strong as Our Weakest Link

The British Virgin Islands (BVI) House of Assembly passed the Computer Misuse and Cybercrime Act on 13 March 2014. This Bill stiffens penalties for crimes related to both the ­distribution of child pornography and also the publication of confidential data. The Bill was deemed necessary after an embarrassing incident last year in which 2.5 million confidential files were leaked from two national trust companies.

One Last Thing
(2014,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

As anyone not living in a cave can attest, literally a day does not go by without some new revelation of cyber hacking, cyber attacking, cyber vulnerabilities or some new cyber surveillance scheme being perpetrated against ‘we the people’ by murky corporate interests – or our own, possibly murkier, governments.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]

Newspapers were full with stories of how the RCMP, supported by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), had just prevented a “terrorist attack” at the BC Legislature on July 1st (Canada Day) 2013. These unfolding events provided a revealing background to my inquiries about Canada’s maritime security infrastructure, and were relevant to my inquiries on how culturally different federal departments work together efficiently.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]
Surveillance, Censorship, Intolerance and Violence

Implications for privacy at the Sochi Olympics
Athletes train their entire lives to compete in their sport at the Olympics. But in Sochi, our athletes, their coaches, sports organization representatives, spectators and dignitaries may find themselves competing in a different sort of games… that have already begun (without an opening ceremony).

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

With the minds of the media focussed for the time being on options of the major powers to respond to the use of chemical warfare agents by authorities of the Assad regime in Syria against civilians, where several Middle East terror organizations on both sides are battling for power at the expense of 2 million civilian dead and refugees, it is indeed timely that we offer you some knowledgeable reflections in this issue on anti-terrorism.

(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY ARNAV MANCHANDA

View pdf

Cyberspace - The Fifth Strategic Domain

One Last Thing
(2012,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

It's More Than Gadgets and Gizmos
In the ‘non lab coat’ world of law enforcement, security and first responders, “technology” is a means to an end and not an end unto itself. That ‘end’, of course, is the successful performance of operational duties, which have enormous public safety ramifications as well as real risk to the men and women who perform them on our behalf.

(2012,
issue 1)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

View PDF

Situational awareness is crucial in a CBRNE (Chemical, Biological, Radioactive, Nuclear and/or Explosive) incident. 


Instrument View displays live images and data, and replays data stored from a database.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS [field_writer2]
Transport Canada’s National Aerial Surveillance Program

Canada takes a risk-based management approach to ship-source pollution response, and seeks to prevent marine pollution ­incidents. This prevention and response ­capability to deal with marine pollution incidents arising from ships is buttressed by the National Aerial Surveillance Program (NASP). Administered by the Canadian Coast Guard from its inception in 1991 until 2003 when Transport Canada took on the responsibility, the NASP is an integral element of Canada’s ocean management.

(2011,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY DORON BERGERBEST-EILON
From Corporate Espionage

We know that attacks on critical infrastructures from criminal threats, corporate or industrial espionage and/or politically motivated sabotage, could threaten public safety, impact national security, or even create economic upheaval or environmental disaster. What we may not know is that a large percentage of critical infrastructures is actually privately owned and that private security forces are becoming the primary protectors of vital infrastructure.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Similar to most threats to our public safety and national security, port security involves fundamental principles for staying safe from either natural disruptions or actions by criminals and terrorists. Response, Recovery and Resilience are well known common principles upon which to structure the security of ports, build programs and develop systems to suit the ­specific environment.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY TIM DUNNE [field_writer2]

The marine industry is an essential lifeline for so many of our daily needs. Annually, Canada’s commercial marine industry ­generates $10 billion in economic activity and $117 billion in international trade. It is responsible for 100,000 jobs that manage and move the 456 million tonnes of cargo annually.

(2011,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY CRAIG S. LOSTY

COP – Common Operating (or Operational) Picture – includes relevant operational information such as ­command post, snipers, enemies, buildings, and terrain. It can be also represented visually, such as with maps, photos, pictometry, diagrams and charts. An effective COP will be simultaneously available to all ­participants while the action is occurring.

(2011,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY CRAIG S. GALBRAITH and LOU KELLY

Can a local university make a significant difference in regional first responder and homeland security efforts? The answer is yes – if done right. Universities often have the reputation (sometimes deserved, sometimes not) of being intellectually and physically distant from the surrounding community, the classic “ivory tower” analogy. This is somewhat understandable since the historical dual-pronged mission of higher education institutions is to first, educate our post-secondary students, and second, contribute to the continuously expanding body of scholarly knowledge.

(2010,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY AARON WYNN and KIERAN MOORE

The global population is approaching 7 billion people and, combined with the ease and frequency of modern air travel, this gives rise to a rapidly increased public health risk at major world events. Mass gatherings, as they have come to be called, are largely pre-planned events, held for a limited time and attended by more than 25,000 people. These events can include any number of purposes – political, religious, athletic – and can be attended by, for instance, 300,000 rabid soccer fans at a FIFA World Cup, or 2.5 million pilgrims at the Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]
How Secure Are They?

At 6:41 p.m. local time on 19 January 2010, a woman arrived at the luxury Al Bustan Rotana hotel in Dubai, accompanied by a large man in a Panama hat. Unbeknownst to hotel staff or authorities in the popular emirate, the couple were part of a clandestine group sent to Dubai to track and kill Mahmoud al-Mabhouh, a senior Hamas commander.

(2009,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

While the term “War on Terror” has been causing “political correctness” controversies of late, the situation needs to be defined, if only to have all parties on the same page. If it’s not a war, then what is it? Because these terror tactics will not stop, it is in some respects far worse than a conventional war, as we all know too well. We thought we had the air transport security threat under control – then along comes the “Underpants Bomber,” who, almost completely and ­single-handedly, wrecked the calm of our holiday season.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER [field_writer2]

Video surveillance cameras have been used widely for two or three decades and are now so prevalent that almost every Canadian living in an urban environment is captured on camera at some point in their day.


Video cameras have been widely used for two or three decades and are now so prevalent that almost every Canadian living in an urban environment is captured on camera at some point in their day.

(2009,
issue 3)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

In July, two rookie police officers of the Edmonton Police Service spotted a car with stolen license plates and pulled it over. As they searched the vehicle, the officers found 80 illegal credit cards as well as drugs and fake driver licenses. The occupants, a man and woman, were arrested.

(2008,
issue 2)
[field_writer2]

Today, mobile field camps are versatile, deployable facilities for both civil and military operations. After a short assembly time, they provide comfortable living and working conditions designed to ease some of the strain of an extended period of deployment. Field camps with sufficient infrastructure can provide the basis for continuous ­operational readiness, sustainability and motivation.

(2008,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY STUART BRINDLEY
Do Government and Critial Infrastructure Sectors Communicate?

In the Spring 2007 edition of FrontLine Security, I described the work underway to develop ­voluntary partnerships between those who own and operate our critical infrastructures and their U.S. and Canadian governments. These partnerships will help establish trusted ­mechanisms to share information between governments and the critical infrastructure (CI) sectors; information that is essential to address the threats and hazards that could disrupt the reliable delivery of basic services such as telecommunications, electricity, water, fuel, and natural gas.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]

Proactive Cyber Defence doctrine compels an ­enterprise to act by interdicting and disrupting an attack preemptively in self-defence to oppose an attack against their computer infrastructure.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS QUIGGIN [field_writer2]

One comment currently being heard in British Columbia is that the upcoming 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics will be “a sporting event, not a security event.”

(2007,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY ALICE D'ANJOU

Over the past several years, a series of previously unthinkable events have caused the RCMP to consider its state of operational readiness. Sept 11th, Hurricane Katrina, and massive bombings in Madrid and London required extra­ordinary efforts from a wide range of responding agencies. Here at home, reports of flooding, forest fires, severe weather, blackouts, terrorist threats, and warnings of an inevitable flu pandemic arrive from all quarters on a regular basis.

(2007,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY KARCH MacLEAN

Feeling a bit like a tourist, I carry my bags “across the brow” of the Canadian navy frigate HMCS St. John’s. The little cabin that I will share with two other officers for the week-long mission can best be described as “a little hole in the wall.” The bunks are barely as long as I am tall, with less than three feet of space in between, but the black ball cap, embroidered with the name HMCS St. John’s, catches my attention. Lieutenant (Navy) Neville Lockyer informs me that the middle bunk, and the cap, are indeed for me.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]
Canadian Maritime Domestic Security

National Security – The Sea Matters
Over the last six years, in the changed global security environment, Canadians have learned that National Security is a modern imperative that requires profound thought, development, investment, resourcing, and, most of all, government leadership and action. The new threat environment includes globalized threats such as terrorism, multi-national crime organizations, disease epidemics, and ­natural disasters – not simply traditional, state-oriented threats.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY NORMA REVELER

Radar surveillance systems have long been proven to be effective security tools in military applications – and now are affordable enough to be used by homeland security and law enforcement agencies that have tight budgets.


Accipter Radar tracks displayed at Operations Centre

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY R.J. QUINN

With the longest coastline in the world (243,772 km), and a marine area of responsibility of over 11 million square kilo­meters, Canada faces a formidable surveillance challenge! Along these shores are 250 ports and, on a typical day, 1700 ships are in our area of responsibility. It is important to know exactly what is happening in the ocean approaches to our borders. The goal in marine security, therefore, is to obtain “domain awareness” so that we can deal with potential threats before they get too close.

(2006,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY JACK E. SMITH

A year ago, the Science and Technology Foresight Directorate of the Office of the National Science Advisor (ONSA) was asked to assist the new Public Security Technical Program (PSTP), a joint security technology initiative of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada (PSEPC) and Defence Research & Development Canada (DRDC).

One Last Thing
(2006,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

He has seven separate aliases (that we know of), and is believed to possess American, Guyanese, Trinidadian and Canadian passports as well as pilot training. He is an engineering graduate that the FBI reports attended Ontario’s McMaster University (where he sought to acquire nuclear material) as well as Al Qaeda training camps before 9/11. He speaks English flawlessly having been raised in New York and Florida where his associates included Jose Padilla and Mohammed Atta.

(2006,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY TIM CONNORS

Chief among their conclusions ought to be that this threat has global reach and is alive and well – and that there is no silver bullet counter measure that will prevent the next attack. Both assessments have profound meaning for how our state and local public safety agencies are organizing and preparing their people for this new age of security.

(2006,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY KATHRYN KARCZ

Halton Region takes a “no stone left unturned approach” to planning for emergencies. With a population expected to exceed 439,000 by 2007, Halton is a socially and economically dynamic community located in south western Ontario. Its landscape is an integration of rural and urban interests, ­supported by agriculture and industry. From an emergency preparedness ­perspective, there are many challenges – severe weather, spills, and transportation accidents to name a few. The challenge of a lifetime, however, will be a pandemic influenza.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY PETER HILLIER [field_writer2]

Outsourcers have a responsibility to protect client data regardless of where it flows or is stored – as is certainly highlighted by a barrage of client data security breaches of late.

U.S. Ambassador to Canada, David H. Wilkins
(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY FRONTLINE STAFF

8 May 2006 – A Trade Americas Security Exhibition, jointly organized by the U.S Commercial Service and the Conference Board of Canada, took place at the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa. Keynote speaker, David H. Wilkins, U.S.

(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY KEN DUNLAP

Protecting our passengers and employees with effective and efficient security measures is the highest priority for the aviation industry. However, since the tragic events of September 11, 2001, the airline industry has endured a continuous stream of stopgap security measures – many of these were rushed into effect with little or no industry input. What we are finding, is that a security system designed through hastened reaction to a crisis may not be the best long-term solution for the industry.