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(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

The recent summit of the “three amigos” – hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and involving U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto – brought considerable excitement to the Ottawa area. The wide ranging topics discussed and agreements signed during the short 1-day event are a testament to the strength of the relationships.

SPECIAL REPORT
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Canada bears the general strain and impact of illicit tobacco the same as many communities and countries around the world, and yet the conditions in Canada are somewhat unique in that the black market for illegal smokes is largely self-imposed.

SPECIAL REPORT
(2016,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

THE 360° APPROACH

(2016,
issue 1)
BY K. JOSEPH SPEARS [field_writer2]

Critical issues loom from a national security, foreign policy and overall security perspective in the long term. The brief, but focused, Speech from the Throne on 4 December 2015 laid out broad parameters and included the new federal government’s position on defence:

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

Securetech, the public safety, emergency management and security trade show and conference organized by the Canadian Association of Defence and Security Industries (CADSI), has been cancelled for 2016.

"After extensive consultations with our members, we have decided that, at the present time, our annual security conference and trade show, Securetech, is not meeting the needs and demands of the industry and will not be held in its current form in 2016," said CADSI President Christyn Cianfarani.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Backgrounder, as provided by the Embassy for Turkey in Canada:

"The developments unfolded in Turkey was a bloody coup attempt by a group of plotters in the military, linked to the Fethullah Gülen Terrorist Organization (FETÖ), to overthrow the democratically-elected Government and the constitutional order in Turkey.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

Over the next two days, Her Majesty’s Canadian Ships (HMCS) Brandon, Edmonton and Kingston are departing to participate in Operation Caribbe, Canada’s contribution the multinational campaign against illicit trafficking by transnational criminal organizations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and Caribbean.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

After protesters shut down five oil pipelines carrying Canadian crude oil, police and energy companies say preventing a disruption is 'near impossible'.  After the attacks, police, pipeline companies and government officials on both sides of the Canada-US border addressed the threat.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY VALARIE FINDLAY [field_writer2]

Why Canada and its partners need to focus on defining, mitigating and managing – not eliminating – terrorism.

(2015,
[field_writer2]

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan yesterday launched the annual Halifax International Security Forum by underscoring the timely importance of bringing together key defence leaders to discuss a number of pressing global security issues.

(2014,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]
An Intercontinental Gateway

Much of the “stuff” Canadians have acquired over the past three decades arrived here from Asia in a shipping container. What is important to both the seller and the purchaser is delivery time, which means the logistics governing the movement of containers around the globe serve one key purpose – time to market.

(2014,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY DEPARTMENT of FISHERIES and OCEANS STAFF

OPERATION DRIFTNET – Charged with monitoring and protecting the state of the vulnerable resources that lay below, Frank Snelgrove (below) hovers above the North Pacific Ocean in a CP-140 Aurora aircraft, monitoring the endless expanse of water for hours on end.


Frank Snelgrove stands near a CP-140 Aurora preparing for duty.

Editor's Corner
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Roots
We have dedicated this issue to Border Security. It is both timely and important that we do so, for we North American neighbours find ourselves at a critical juncture in this more globally accessible and competitive world where we benefit from reasonably stable governments, are blessed by vast territory, rich resources, significantly intertwined economies and secular institutions open to all members of our society.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
Courses of Action

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Q. After two years in a very dynamic realm of major change at the CBSA what do you view as the three major accomplishments of your agency in securing our borders in an efficient manner and what, in your view, are the three greatest challenges in the next three years?

RCMP C/Supt Joe Oliver
(2013,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police since 1986, Chief Superintendent Oliver became Director General Border Integrity in April 2009. He was responsible for overseeing the delivery of five law enforcement programs that contribute to the national security of Canada, and the protection of Canadians from terrorism, orga­nized crime, and other ­border-related criminality.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
A Compilation of FrontLine Articles

In the murky world of criminal behaviour and clandestine side deals, there lurks a menace to economic fairness and good government – and this is especially evident in the debate on how to deal with the illicit trade in smokes. Public safety and national security are important social issues that are negatively affected by the prevalence of illicit trade in tobacco in Canada (and the world). The complexity of the contraband tobacco issue has provided much fodder for FrontLine Security’s detailed exposé on the topic over the past year.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Unfortunately, the clamour over the dangers of tobacco has overpowered any intelligible discourse concerning what to do about illicit tobacco. The only audible voices expressing concern are organizations that are trying to protect their bottom dollar as the market turns towards cheaper products.

(2012,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

Many people believe the sale of contraband tobacco is a “victimless crime,” acknowledges Gary Grant, a retired police officer and spokesperson for the National Coalition Against Contraband Tobacco. In fact, he suggests every Canadian is a victim of the contraband tobacco chain. Profit from Illegal cigarettes finances criminal gangs, cuts legitimate tax revenues, defeats attempts to discourage tobacco use (which is overloading the health care system), and harms new generations of Canadian young people every day.

(2012,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY JIM PHILLIPS

The Canadian/U.S. relationship in the 21st century demands the facilitation and growth of trade, tourism, and job creation for continued economic strength while protecting the citizens of both countries. Canada and the U.S. must act to make both of our countries safe, secure, and economically viable in a global economy. A trade ­efficient Canada/U.S. border, under whatever levels of necessary security, must become a reality.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

The first of this three-part series provided a global perspective, and this second article examines ­environmental factors of the illicit tobacco market, looking at illicit trade along Canada’s tobacco roads. Our focus is almost exclusively on illicit cigarettes manufactured in Ontario and Quebec and the factors driving this specific and lucrative trade. Watch for the final installment of FrontLine’s tobacco series, (to appear in the next edition), which will examine possible courses of action to reduce the scope and impact of the illicit trade.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]
(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MICHAEL C. IRCHA
(2012,
issue 1)
[field_writer2]

Canada's largest law firm, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP (BLG), has long recognized that businesses operating in the defence and security industry sectors routinely encounter complex issues that require a specialized type of legal expertise. For this reason, it created a Defence and Security Industry Group comprised of lawyers, patent agents and other professionals who have sectoral experience working with industry clients in a wide range of areas.

(2011,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY JEAN LOUP Le ROUX

Canada and the United Kingdom both enforce similar export regulations through the Controlled Goods Directorate (CGD) and the Export Control Organisation (ECO). Domestic laws restricting exports are known as “Export Control” (EC). A broad range of commercial goods, including ­certain off-the-shelf valves, gauges, electronics, computers, optics, ­sensors, software, and other items of a seemingly commercial nature are EC-regulated. Many of these items do not have to be solely of U.S. origin to be subject to ITAR/EC.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2] and DAVID MUGRIDGE

With globalization, many national economies, including Canada’s, are dependent on global trade – and maritime transportation is the strongest link in the international supply chain. International shipping has become a fundamental contributor and facilitator of economic growth; but it is increasingly susceptible to events that could result in the full or partial closure of ports or associated critical infrastructure.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY TIM DUNNE [field_writer2]

The marine industry is an essential lifeline for so many of our daily needs. Annually, Canada’s commercial marine industry ­generates $10 billion in economic activity and $117 billion in international trade. It is responsible for 100,000 jobs that manage and move the 456 million tonnes of cargo annually.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY INDUSTRY SHOWCASE

The security industries’ supply chains have evolved over the past decade to include various subcontractors or specialized resources that help you bring your products to market. When looking at the bigger picture, your supply chain has grown to encompass other organizations that add value to your products. These partnerships form your value network and can include research laboratories, universities, testing facilities, clients, and government. All of these partners play a role in your success.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

Since before Confederation, the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence River and other waterways through which the Canada-U.S. border runs have been maritime freeways used by smugglers. Booze, weapons, cigarettes, drugs and other cargoes such as illegal aliens have been transported between Canada and the United States for decades.  


RCMP Photo

One Last Thing
(2009,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

I think it was during Day Three of SARS Outbreak Two that the wisdom of what Dr Jim Young had been saying really struck me. “The best strategy to manage an emergency or mitigate a disaster is to prevent it from happening in the first place, beginning with understanding what causes it.” I couldn’t help but reflect on that as I read the intriguing article in this issue of FrontLine entitled. “When Faith Becomes a Political Force.”

(2008,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY MIKE TODDINGTON

As identified by the Canada Council, competing ports in the U.S. have a much better foundation under which to work. American ports are publicly owned, and port officials are elected locally, therefore, port developments in the local public interest receive grants derived from local taxation. Alternatively, limited human and financial resources continue to present a significant disadvantage for Canadian ports.

Editor's Corner
(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Spring issue on Terrorism and Critical Infrastructure Protection ­generated much interest and comment. As we embark on the key trial of Momin Khawaja, the first Canadian-born to be charged under the new ­terrorist legislation, the issues brought up in our last edition by Howie Marsh and Tom Quiggin will surely resonate in the minds of our readers.

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Country and Western singer Toby Keith immortalized this phrase in his gravelly ballad about relationship expectations. His sentiment was right at home last month at the Conference Board of Canada’s Critical Infrastructure (CI) Security Conference. As several presenters and delegates noted, despite the passage of six and a half years since 9/11, Canada still lacks a comprehensive, clear strategy aimed at securing Critical Infrastructure and ensuring, to the extent possible, its business resiliency.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU
Canada-U.S. border partnerships in the St. Lawrence Seaway

On 3 September 2007, at about 6:40 p.m., officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the U.S. Coast Guard spotted an 18-foot boat ­transporting large green plastic bags on the St. Lawrence River. As the authorities approached, the driver abandoned the boat in the water, just off the eastern tip of Cornwall Island, Ontario, and fled on foot.

One Last Thing
(2007,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

As this issue of FrontLine Security illustrates, the marine component of domestic security measures has never been as important for Canada as it is today. The reasons for this is, of course, are fairly obvious.