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(2016,
issue 4)
BY JONATHAN CALOF

Police analytics can be extremely valuable in the fight against terrorism and crime. By identifying which events are most likely to escalate, predictive techniques can both improve prevention capability and control costs by deploying officers before escalation and where they are needed most.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY NICOLA DAVIES

Disaster response requires managing recovery operations aimed at reducing the impacts of disasters. A disaster site might contain several lingering threats, including dangerous chemicals, toxic materials, precarious rubble, human remains, and may still be in the throes of extreme conditions such as wildfires, floods, hurricanes, sink-holes, tornadoes, and winter storms.

(2016,

 

Airbus Defence and Space is designing and building a new constellation of optical satellites, comprising four identical and very agile sensors delivering very high-resolution imagery. The highly responsive dual VHR constellation will offer state-of-the art service to the Airbus Defence and Space imagery user’s community for the next decade.

(2015,

Students at Canadian Universities have responded in record numbers to the 2016 Unmanned Systems Canada Student UAS Competition. A total of 18 teams from across Canada have registered for the event. 

(2014,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

The soaring appeal of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) is undeniable. Whether autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or remotely-piloted vehicles (RPVs) in fixed-wing or rotorcraft configurations, the technologies enable the public and private sectors to dramatically reduce costs. Their military value has been demonstrated in Afghanistan, and other public-sector uses such as law enforcement, forest fire surveys and environmental monitoring are proving equally effective.

(2012,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD BRAY

View pdf

Canadian Cops Pioneer Unmanned Aerial Vehicles
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) give public agencies new ‘eyes in the sky’ and Canadian law enforcement is leading the way.

Editor's Corner
(2012,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY

Frontline Security continues its thrust to influence national security policies – to enable citizens, first responders and government officials to protect Canadians as we would expect in today’s world. One of the major determinants of this world is the rise in overall influence, for good and bad, of the cyber presence. This edition includes many articles on technology and the sharing of information to elicit better responses to safety and security challenges.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY DAVID MUGRIDGE
Bringing Together Law and Technology

Weaknesses and Threats
Most serious security practitioners recognize the Western world’s vulnerability to ­maritime-based terrorist violence and that its inability to combat serious criminal activity at sea is increasing. Traditionally, global financial crises, like today’s, have resulted in marked deterioration of national and personal security. The need for flexibility in our national responses to maritime security challenges has never been greater, and with that flexibility comes the clear need for technology.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS

(2009,
issue 1)
BY EDWARD VINCIGUERRA

Public transportation systems offer significant potential targets for terrorist attack, as the large numbers of people in enclosed environments would contribute greatly to the devastating effects of biological and chemical weapons. However, there are options available to address this type of threat.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY CATHERINE JOHNSTON

In a world plagued by terrorism, identity fraud, hackers and other security risks, there is a question of whether we need to give up our privacy to gain security. Canadians should refuse to enter this debate, because this is the wrong question if we seek to find a balance between our right to privacy, need for personal ­security and desire to conduct business electronically.

One Last Thing
(2006,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK

He has seven separate aliases (that we know of), and is believed to possess American, Guyanese, Trinidadian and Canadian passports as well as pilot training. He is an engineering graduate that the FBI reports attended Ontario’s McMaster University (where he sought to acquire nuclear material) as well as Al Qaeda training camps before 9/11. He speaks English flawlessly having been raised in New York and Florida where his associates included Jose Padilla and Mohammed Atta.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY JOE VARNER

Canada and her European allies had best beware of the Lebanon-based ­terrorist group Hezbollah as UN negotiations to halt Iran’s military nuclear program continue in stalemate, and tensions rise with Israel and the U.S.

On July 11, the eve of the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers that sparked the recent conflict, Ali Larijani, the head of Iran’s National Security Council, threatened European Union negotiators that Iran would harm Western interests if its nuclear program was referred back to the UN Security Council.