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Whidbey Island SAR MH-60S helicopter in the North Cascades National Park. Photo:Ignacio D. Perez
Firefighting crews from CAL FIRE. Photo: Staff Sgt. Eddie Siguenza
Port Hueneme Police Department K-9 Unit & CNRSW Police. Photo: Navymailman
A border services agent hands back a mans passport after scanning.
Vancouver police department.
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IN THE NEWS

Nov 27

Iranian Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, whose forces have killed, injured or incarcerated hundreds of protestors in recent weeks, said November 26 that his Basij militia have sacrificed lives “to protect people from rioters.” Affiliated with the Revolutionary Guard Corps, the civilian force has been at the forefront of the state crackdown, and Khamenei said their involvement “shows that Islamic Revolution is alive.”

Nov 27

With European Union states generally united against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Serbia’s insistence on neutrality is creating friction as it pursues EU membership. EU officials have made it clear that Serbia is expected to align foreign policies, including by imposing sanctions on Russia. Serbia applied for membership in 2009 and has been in accession talks since 2014.

Nov 27

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen resigned November 26 as head of the governing Democratic Progressive Party after her strategy to frame local elections as showing defiance of China failed to win support. The main Kuomintang party led or claimed victory in 13 of 21 city and county elections. Tsai remains president until 2024.

Nov 27

Vladimir Makei, Belarus’ foreign minister since August 2012, has died at the age of 64. His death was reported on social media November 26 by his ministry, two days before a scheduled meeting with his Russian counterpart, but no other details were provided.

Nov 25

British Columbia today became the first Canadian jurisdiction to ensure that indigenous communities can provide their own child and family services, passing legislation as part of a general overhaul of child welfare programs. Statistics Canada said that some 68 per cent of children younger than 14 in provincial care programs in B.C. were indigenous in 2021 compared with nearly 54 per cent nationally.

Nov 25

The U.S. Federal Communications Commission announced unprecedented rules today designed to ban several Chinese telecom companies it considers an “unacceptable risk to national security” because of how their products could be used to interfere 5G wireless networks and collect sensitive information. FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr said the move against Huawei and four other companies had “broad, bipartisan backing” among congressional leaders.

Nov 25

The federal government’s reliance on “client-solicitor privilege” to prevent access to cabinet decisions which could provide insight into the government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act was challenged today by a constitutional lawyer who argued that it was “in the interest of transparency.” When he put the question to Prime Minister Trudeau, who did not immediately respond, a government lawyer interjected that privilege is “a very substantial right in our legal system.”

Nov 25

The federal government has been accused by Alberta of planning to “ban legal firearm ownership altogether” with a proposed amendment to Bill C-21, a gun-control bill currently before a parliamentary committee. The change would prohibit “a firearm that is a rifle or shotgun, that is capable of discharging centre-fire ammunition in a semi-automatic manner and that is designed to accept a detachable cartridge magazine with a capacity greater than five cartridges of the type for which the firearm was originally designed.”

Nov 25

A Saskatchewan man has been ordered by a Court of Queen’s Bench judge to pay $160,000 in damages for posting nude images of a woman on Internet pornography sites. In setting the penalty, the largest of its kind in Canada to date, Justice Krista Zerr found that Daylan Heidel's “flagrant and outrageous” behaviour had “unleashed a torrent of degrading, humiliating and frightening content” directed at his victim. Heidel’s lawyer has said his client likely would petition for bankruptcy because “you can’t squeeze blood out of a stone.”

Nov 25

The Quebec government will appeal a provincial Superior Court court ruling that police were violating drivers’ constitutional rights by stopping them without cause and that the practice is “a safe conduit for racial profiling.” Public Security François Bonnardel said in announcing the challenge that it is “unjustified to abolish a tool that is so important to police services.”

Nov 25

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told the Emergencies Act inquiry today that his decision to invoke the legislation to end “freedom” protests last February stemmed from a concern about what might happen if he didn’t. “This was a moment where the collective advice of cabinet, of the public service, and my own inclination, was that this was a moment to do something . . . to keep Canadians safe.”

Nov 25

Brendan Miller, the Alberta lawyer representing a group of “Freedom Convoy” protestors before the Emergencies Act inquiry, is being sued for defamation over his claim that Brian Fox, a partner in a public relations firm carried a Nazi flag into the Ottawa blockade in February in an attempt to discredit the protestors. Miller tried to dismiss the suit November 24 as “intimidation” but Fox, who has received death threats, was not even in Ottawa when the alleged incident occurred.

Nov 24

In what was widely seen as a renewed effort to ease tensions between their countries over trade and Taiwan, U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin and General Wei Fenghe met in Cambodia earlier this week. It came just over a week after U.S. President Joe Biden the U.S. is willing to “compete vigorously, but I’m not looking for conflict.”

Nov 24

A British Columbia businessman who has visited the U.S. on business trips dozens of times a year without a problem, has been banned for life. Jonathan Houweling says that when he was chosen for a random search earlier this month, U.S. officers found a bottle of cannabidiol oil he had left in his vehicle a couple of years ago and then forgotten about it. While cannabis is legal in neighbouring Washington state, its sale, possession and distribution are illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act.

Nov 24

Accusing RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki of damaging the federal police force, Alberta Justice Minister Tyler Shandro called November 23 for her dismissal but it was immediately rejected by Public Safety Minister Marco Mendicino. “The commissioner . . . must be held to the highest of standards,” Shandro said. “So far, Minister Mendicino has stood idly by while Commissioner Lucki has failed to meet even the most meagre of standards for the past two years.”

Nov 24

The federal government and the Assembly of First Nations are seeking judicial review of a Canadian Human Rights Tribunal rejection of the government’s $20-billion offer to settle a class-action lawsuit over underfunding of on-reserve child welfare. Indigenous Services Minister Patty Hajdu and Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Marc Miller said they want “clarity” on how to address the parts of the deal the tribunal rejected.

Nov 24

A complaint by former Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro about alleged problems with last month’s election was rejected November 23 by the head of the country’s electoral court who described the challenge as “offensive” to democratic norms. The former army officer who lost by a slim margin to Luiz Inancio Lula da Silva, a returning left-wing leader, claimed that some electronic voting machines were flawed and those votes should be invalidated.

Nov 24

Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said today that an “exponential” economic threat posed by border blockades last February was a key factor in the government’s invocation of the Emergencies Act. She told the inquiry into the government’s decision that Canada was already facing several serious economic challenges when the situation erupted, including supply-chain problems and U.S. protectionism.

Nov 24

Barrick Gold Corporation, a Toronto-based mining company with operations in more than a dozen countries, is being sued in the Superior Court of Justice by a group of Tanzanian villagers over alleged police killings, torture and other abuses. The plaintiffs include relatives of five men killed by Tanzanian police assigned to protect the mine near the border with Kenya.

Nov 24

An additional $1.6 billion in long-term support for communities facing the weather-related effects of climate change is a key element of a new federal adaptation strategy announced today by Emergency Preparedness Minister Bill Blair. The funding mostly tops up existing programs but not major capital projects.

FRONTLINE COMMENTARY

(Nov 22)
Chris MacLean's picture

Statistics Canada reports that the national homicide rate continues to increase. In 2021, almost a quarter of the 788 murders across Canada were connected to gang activity.

(Sep 08)
Scott Newark's picture

A stabbing spree resulted in 10 deaths and 19 injured. Could this major tragedy have been averted? Let's look at the laws that allowed Myles Sanderson the freedom to kill.

(Aug 18)
Chris MacLean's picture

Interference is typically an extremely valid and indisputable concern, but in the case of the NS shooting spree, that argument is being used to obfuscate the real issue of communication negligence which resulted in deaths that could have been avoided.

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Frontline Security Cover Issue 1 - 2022