2021 issue 1

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Bill C-21
BY SCOTT NEWARK

There has been considerable controversy over Bill C-21, which was introduced in February 2021. Let’s take a look.

BY BILL NEADLES

Effective safety & security requires training and experience – lots of it. A basic understanding of the concepts and training of the emergency management world can be a tremendous asset to the security specialist tasked with emergency planning and response.

BY S/SGT LINDSEY HOUGHTON

Gangs have been embracing the “unknown” advantage for contracting out their dirty deeds. Movement and expansion of gangs is on the increase across Canada. 

BY DUSTINE RODIER

After years of being located in Truro, the Nova Scotia RCMP Operational Communications Centre moves into state-of-the-art facilities in Dartmouth. Will it impact operations?

Looking past COVID to the
BY PASCAL RODIER

2020 presented a new challenge for safety and security professionals. COVD-19 impacted the globe with unprecedented response efforts at all levels. We saw hurricanes, blizzards, tornadoes, floods, forest fires, civil unrest, violence and domestic threats continue to impact communities as the safety and security sector modified strategies to adapt to the combined threat.

CYBER DECEPTION
BY DAVE McMAHON

The art of deception and misdirection, particularly in the cyber domain, is being widely practiced and diligently perfected by others. The dangers of social media deception are real, but are we countering?

BY BRUCE PITT-PAYNE

The witness, victim and suspect all have conflicting agendas. The interviewer methodically blocks opportunities to later “evolve” testimony. 

Call for Action
BY ALEXANDER FREMIS

In this digital age, many threats to national security can be linked in some way to foreign-sponsored disinformation campaigns. This article calls upon the Government of Canada to take steps to establish on a national, strategic counter-disinformation plan that will mitigate any impact going forward.

Failing our Veterans

The last hospital wholly owned and operated by Veterans Affairs Canada on the West Island of Montreal, was transferred to the province of Québec with a monetary allowance for each Veteran living there. Services and care immediately declined as staff departed over pay cuts and reduced hours. This failure to care properly for our war Veterans also highlights the deficiencies in elder care across the country. Will the battle waged by a 96-year old Veteran create change before it’s too late?

BY PETER HILLIER

Confronting the numerous risks and complexities that emerge when attempting to secure Supply Chains is a more daunting task when mandatory standards have not been established. Enough information exists to build a regulatory framework for Canada; what we need is a commitment to do something about it.