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issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Tragedies at Paris, Brussels, Orlando, Nice, Berlin, Manchester, London, and other recent incidents in the West have galvanized a wave of self-reflection for both policymakers and individuals. The grief, confusion, and anger that comes about in the days following such attacks typically brings with it a deeper introspection into the best practices to prevent and respond to acts of terror aimed at ‘soft targets’ of civilian entertainment and daily life.