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Bill C-21
(2021,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]
There has been considerable controversy over Bill C-21, which was introduced in February 2021.
 
Promoted as being designed “to tackle the increase in gun-related violence and gang activity”, the Bill, despite the obvious and legitimate public safety concerns, will allow lawful owners of now-prohibited ‘assault style’ firearms to keep their weapons – although not to use them.
 
This permission would seem to contradict the political rhetoric from the Prime Minister and the Minister of Public Safety about the dangers to society these wea
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As part of the Government’s comprehensive strategy to build safer communities and combat gun and gang violence with what it deems "common sense" laws, the Honourable Bill Blair, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, announced that, effective 7 July 2021, the Government of Canada is expanding mandatory firearms licence background checks to cover the lifetime of an applicant and reinstating the requirement to seek Authorization to Transport (ATT) for restricted and prohibited firearms to most locations.

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issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Tragedies at Paris, Brussels, Orlando, Nice, Berlin, Manchester, London, and other recent incidents in the West have galvanized a wave of self-reflection for both policymakers and individuals. The grief, confusion, and anger that comes about in the days following such attacks typically brings with it a deeper introspection into the best practices to prevent and respond to acts of terror aimed at ‘soft targets’ of civilian entertainment and daily life.