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(2020,
issue 1)
BY VALARIE FINDLAY [field_writer2]

National Security, the Economy and COVID-19: Fifty Shades of the Grey Zone

COVID-19. It’s the stuff that gripping, suspense-filled movies are made of:

A new virus of a mysterious origin emerges in a faraway land. Shifting from an epidemic to a pandemic within weeks, it spreads like wildfire across the globe. Infecting thousands upon thousands, healthcare and social services systems creak under its strain, militaries are on standby and national security is on high alert.
 

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The U.S. medical community has lambasted President Donald Trump for suggesting that ultraviolet irradiation or injections of disinfectant could be effective against COVID-19. He picked up on the notion from a White House official who said research had indicated a number of topical treatments appeared to be effective.

 

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On 12 May, following priority scientific review, Health Canada authorized the first COVID-19 serological test for use in Canada. Canadian laboratories will be able to use the Liaison analyzer to detect antibodies specific to COVID-19.

As the first such test approved in Canada, it will determine whether a person was exposed to COVID-19 and if virus-fighting antibodies remain in their system. Such testing will be extremely helpful for understanding the virus, its lifecycle and its long term effects. 

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(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY ANDRÉ FECTEAU

The scene: Just before 11:30 a.m. on Feb. 17, 2006, Mother Nature wreaks havoc with snow, rain, wind, and a flash freeze just east of Ottawa, near the town of Embrun. Driving conditions are terrible, but Highway 417 is busy, as usual. Suddenly, fierce winds create whiteout conditions and vehicles start crashing into each other, with some cars getting stuck under tractor-trailers.