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Violent extremism and acts of terrorism have no place in Canadian society or abroad. According to Public Safety Minister Bill Blair, the listing of terrorist entities under the Criminal Code sends a strong message that Canada will not tolerate this type of activity, and will do everything in its power to counter the ongoing threat to Canada’s national security and its citizens.

The Government of Canada has placed four new terrorist entities on the Criminal Code list, including:

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Charges have been withdrawn against an Ontario man who claimed to have travelled to Syria in 2016 to join ISIS and committed acts of terrorism. Shehroze Chaudhry was charged last year with perpetrating a hoax and his lawyer has explained that the behaviour was due to immaturity, not criminal intent. While the charge has been dropped, Chaudhry has entered into a peace bond and will abide by other conditions for 12 months.

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The U.S. killing of Iranian MGen Qassem Soleimani with a missile strike in January is being called “unlawful and arbitrary under international law” by a UN investigator who says the U.S. had offered no proof for President Donald Trump’s explanation that the strike was necessary to stop Soleimani from “plotting imminent and sinister attacks.”

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The following letter was released from the High Commission for Pakistan on 18 February 2019.

Pakistan’s position on Pulwama Kashmir incident

18 February 2019

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A new study from Ohio University faculty shows that people are less supportive of practices to extract information from terrorist suspects when these practices are framed as “torture” rather than the more ambiguous term of “enhanced interrogation.”

The study, titled “Shaping Responses to Torture: What You Call It Matters” was conducted by Associate Professor and Director of Experimental Training Kimberly Rios and Visiting Assistant Professor Dominik Mischkowski.

(2019,
[field_writer2]

Today, the Honourable Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, issued the following statement on how certain types of extremist ideologies are described in the 2018 Public Report on the Terrorism Threat to Canada:

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(April 2019) – The NSICP annual report, which had been delivered to the PM in December 2018, has now been released to the public. It covers topics of intelligence priorities, defence intelligence activities, legal authorities, plus oversight and accountability. Numerous federal departments and agencies were involved: CBSA; CSIS; CSE; Justice; DND and the Canadian Armed Forces; FINTRAC; GAC; IRCC; Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre; PCO; Public Safety; RCMP; and Transport Canada.

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Two men, Raed Jaser and Chiheb Esseghaier, had been arrested following Project Smooth, an RCMP national security investigation that began in 2012 and involved an undercover FBI informant who had infiltrated the alleged plot.

They were tried and convicted of terrorism in 2015, and lawyers get to work preparing for an appeal. Last week, they finally won the right to an appeal based on the type of jury selection chosen.

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(2018,
issue 6)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

It’s time for an effective strategy.

(2018,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Why is Canada Cutting Cheques to Suspected Terrorists? It began in 2007 after a lengthy and expensive Inquiry and resulted in a $10.5M payoff to Maher Arar.

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(2017,
issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Tragedies at Paris, Brussels, Orlando, Nice, Berlin, Manchester, London, and other recent incidents in the West have galvanized a wave of self-reflection for both policymakers and individuals. The grief, confusion, and anger that comes about in the days following such attacks typically brings with it a deeper introspection into the best practices to prevent and respond to acts of terror aimed at ‘soft targets’ of civilian entertainment and daily life. 

(2017,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

A Review of the Facts

(2017,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]
A new approach for addressing complex projects and procurements

At FrontLine, we search out new ideas and concepts that could help enhance safety and security.

(2017,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]
the Pathway to Sustainable Conflict Resolution

The collapse of the Berlin Wall and subsequent end of the Cold War brought about myriad dramatic geopolitical changes for all states, whether they were direct players in that confrontation or not.

(2017,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY J. PRAKASH

Malaysian authorities recently announced the violent death of Al-Habisi – a key ring leader of the violent terror group called Abu Sayyaf.

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Terror map reveals danger of segregation
by Andrew Gilligan and Sian Griffiths
The Sunday Times (London)
March 5 2017

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/terror-map-reveals-danger-of-segregation-k33jddhk0

David Anderson, Britain’s independent reviewer of terrorism legislation, has said that to defeat the problem, you have to understand it. A vast new study, the largest of its kind in Europe, aims to do precisely that.

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[field_writer2] By Sean Cann-Sheppard

 

The United Kingdom remains on high alert after a bombing at the Manchester Arena killed 23 people. Various media reports put the number of injured between 64 and 112. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack, but British Intelligence is looking into all possibilities.

Over 1000 British soldiers have been deployed to maintain security in the country, and Prime Minister Theresa May said in a press conference Tuesday that she had raised the country’s security level to ‘critical’. Authorities are warning that another attack “may be imminent”.

(2017,
[field_writer2] By Sean Cann-Sheppard

 

Seven people have been killed, and 48 others have been injured after three attackers drove a van into crowds on London Bridge before stabbing multiple people at Borough Market, late Saturday night, 3 June 2017.

One of those killed in the attack is confirmed to be a Canadian national, 30-year-old Christine Archibald from Castlegar, British Columbia.

The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack Sunday night, though this claim has not yet been verified by authorities.

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Pak Army and ISI recovered 5 Western hostages (1 Canadian, his US National wife, and their three children) from terrorist custody through an intelligence based operation by Pakistan troops and intelligence agencies. They were captured by terrorists from Afghanistan during 2012 and kept as hostages there. US intelligence agencies had been tracking them and shared their shifting across to Pakistan on 11 Oct 2017 through Kurram Agency border.

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(2016,
issue 4)
BY K. JOHN MORROW Jr [field_writer2]

Could powerful molecular methodologies be used to engineer new bioweapons, or will it bring new hope for cures to devastating diseases?

One Last Thing
(2016,
issue 4)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

The issue of national security oversight and review has re-emerged following the recent scathing judgement of M. Justice Noel (2016 FC 1105) regarding CSIS’ deliberate cover up of its ‘metadata’ gathering and retention of personal information of Canadians.

(2016,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]

The Royal Canadian Military Institute (RCMI) recently sponsored a conference entitled "Are We Prepared?" April, 2016.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

The recent summit of the “three amigos” – hosted by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and involving U.S. President Barack Obama and Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto – brought considerable excitement to the Ottawa area. The wide ranging topics discussed and agreements signed during the short 1-day event are a testament to the strength of the relationships.

(2016,
issue 2)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

Encouraging development of safety & security initiatives

Upon taking the helm as the new executive editor of FrontLine Safety & Security, I let readers know that I would be seeking out examples of best practices in safety and security – success stories. I am pleased in this article to report on new safety and security tools, materials and knowledge, all ­arising from investments made through Public Safety Canada’s Kanishka program.

Editor's Corner
(2016,
issue 1)
BY JONATHAN CALOF [field_writer2]

In 2010 Police Chief magazine published an article titled: “s”. In it, they wrote about the critical role that needs to be played by local law enforcement in proactively preventing terrorism.

(2016,
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"We will do whatever is necessary to support our friend and ally, Belgium, in bringing to justice those who are responsible [for today's airport attack in Brussels]," President Obama asserted at a press conference in Cuba today. "This is yet another reminder that the world must unite. We must be together, regardless of nationality or race or faith, in fighting against the scourge of terrorism. We can, and will, defeat those who threaten the security of people all around the world."

(2016,
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In what is being described in local media reports as a terrorist attack, a truck driver sped along Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France, plowing through and over people in the crowd – using his truck as a weapon.

Initial reports estimated more than 30 dead, but that has been recently updated to up tp 73 killed.

The large crowd was celebrating the French national day, Bastille Day, along the waterfront, and the calamity took place as the fireworks were ending, which added to the confusion when gunfire was heard. 

(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

After violent clashes in Ankara and Istanbul leave 161 dead, the government was able to quickly regain control and Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says plotters are being arrested and will be tried for treason. He publicly assured the nation that the government is in charge.

See timeline of events:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/07/16/turkey-coup-president-erdogan-says-military-elements-guilty-of-t/

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Ottawa will spend $35 million over five years to fund programs that reach out to vulnerable people open to radicalization in a bid to prevent terror attacks in Canada.

The federal government is looking to establish national centers for de-radicalization across Canada to fight extremism.

Last week’s events in Strathroy, Ontario, is a good example of why Canada may need to establish ways of preventing radicalization.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Ralph Goodale, Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, made the following statement on the anniversary of 9/11 and the National Day of Service:

The terrible events of September 11, 2001, which took the lives of 3,000 innocent people, including 24 Canadians, represent a senseless tragedy which we must never forget.

The attacks were an affront to our democratic society, and compelled us to strengthen our resolve and collaboration with international partners to defend our values and freedoms.

(2016,
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[field_writer2]

Does the anti-terrorism legislation turn CSIS into a secret police force, free to break laws and violate Canadians' rights as it sees fit?

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Experts are meeting today and tomorrow at Carleton University to discuss “the challenges of dealing with natural resource development projects and activism" - or, in the words of one participant, how to protect Canada's infrastructure from "domestic extremists".

(2016,
[field_writer2]

Jim Carr, the federal natural resources minister says his government will use police and military forces for ensure opposition to new pipelines remains peaceful. The Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and Line 3 replacement both received approval Tuesday.

(2016,
[field_writer2]
(2016,
[field_writer2]

In 2012, CSIS knew exactly where John Maguire was before he left Canada to join ISIS in Syria, where he reportedly died fighting in 2015. Six months later, the RCMP was still trying to trace his movements.

(2016,
[field_writer2]

 

The Honourable Harjit S. Sajjan, Minister of National of Defence, yesterday made the following statement about the truck attack that killed four Israeli solders in Jerusalem:

“As a partner, friend and ally of Israel, Canada fully supports the right of Israelis to live in peace and security, free from the threat of terrorism and incitement to violence.

“Canada condemns this terrorist attack that targeted Israel’s defence forces and expresses our deepest condolences to the victims and their families.”

(2015,
issue 3)
BY TIM DUNNE [field_writer2]


Canadians should take warning from the events in Paris on 13 November. Too often, Canadians dismiss terrorist threats, warnings and close calls with the usual attitude that “Canada is not important enough to attract terrorism,” or that “it can’t happen here.” That kind of thinking is dangerous. It can happen here, and it has happened here.

(2015,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

In the immediate aftermath of the 9-11 terrorist attacks, one of the most important realizations by Government was that a society’s crime vulnerabilities were likely national security vulnerabilities with potentially enormously dangerous consequences. 

(2015,
issue 2)
BY ANNICK TREMBLAY [field_writer2]

The New Paradigm for Chief Security Officers

The role of a director of security, especially with the added spectre of terrorism, takes a different road with the new trends in lone wolf attacks (as famously experienced recently in Boston, Canada, France, and other parts of Europe). These acts involve self-initiated attacks by individuals, with no demonstrable planning or coordination from a larger organization. As such, this type of threat is challenging traditional ways of securing our environment.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY NICOLA DAVIES [field_writer2]

Fear and propaganda are the weapons of war and, increasingly, so too is social media. Indeed, social media has come under attack as it becomes the ideal media outlet for terrorists and extremist groups. Recruitment, training, ­planning and coordination of attacks, intimidation tactics, and displays of weaponry and power have all been achieved online through avenues such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and Whatsapp.

(2015,
issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

A new report being published for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit will no doubt become part of a broader global debate on the need to improve the safety and security of humanitarian healthcare workers deployed in unstable contexts throughout the world.

RCMP members at risk
(2015,
issue 1)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Right on the heels of the Independent Review into the Moncton Shooting, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) suffered another violent gun attack on their stretched line of ­operational officers – this time near ­Edmonton – killing Const. David Wynn, and seriously injuring an unarmed Auxiliary officer.

(2015,
issue 1)
BY VALARIE FINDLAY [field_writer2]

Why Canada and its partners need to focus on defining, mitigating and managing – not eliminating – terrorism.

(2015,
[field_writer2] By the Terrorism Research Initiative

(Vol 9, No 5, 2015) This open access journal in the field of terrorism- and counter-terrorism studies offers numerous peer-reviewed articles on the topic of terrorism.

(2015,
[field_writer2]

(March 2009) Norwegian Defense Research Establishment Research Fellow, Petter Nesser, presented this paper at the conference ?Understanding Jihadism: Origins, Evolution and Future Perspectives? Oslo, 19-21 March 2009.

(2015,
[field_writer2]

(July 2015) The European Union Terrorism Situation and Trend Report, better known as the TE-SAT, aims to provide law enforcement officials, policy makers and the general public with a fact-based understanding with regard to terrorism in the European Union (EU). In addition to the presentation of facts, it seeks to identify trends in the development of this phenomenon.

(2015,
[field_writer2]

According to a “Secret” Canada Border Services Agency report filed in Federal Court, the Kandasamy temple, in east-end Toronto, is controlled by the World Tamil Movement, which is on the Canadian government’s list of terrorist organizations.

(2015,
[field_writer2]
(2014,
issue 2)
BY CASEY BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Protecting at home and abroad

The United States National Guard serves as a state-federal reserve component of the U.S. Armed Forces. Its 450,000 soldiers and airmen serve as “citizen soldiers” – deploying both overseas and domestically, while maintaining full-time civilian professions. With experience in a wide range of operational environments, from Afghanistan and Iraq to post-Hurricane Katrina disaster response, the National Guard has proven instrumental in achieving objectives set both by state and federal authorities.

(2014,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY AVI JORISCH

Human rights and liberal values are under threat in a small, little-known country most people would be hard-pressed to find on a map. Following the radical vision of Usama bin Laden and his followers, Brunei Darussalam became an Islamic state under strict Sharia law this past week, with punishments of death by stoning for ­adulterers and severing of limbs for thieves.

(2014,
[field_writer2]

(updated) The NCTC compiles observations on types of attacks and attackers, numbers of victims and targets, and assesses trends.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]

Newspapers were full with stories of how the RCMP, supported by the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), had just prevented a “terrorist attack” at the BC Legislature on July 1st (Canada Day) 2013. These unfolding events provided a revealing background to my inquiries about Canada’s maritime security infrastructure, and were relevant to my inquiries on how culturally different federal departments work together efficiently.

(2013,
issue 3)
BY DAVE McMAHON [field_writer2]

Surveillance, Censorship, Intolerance and Violence

Implications for privacy at the Sochi Olympics
Athletes train their entire lives to compete in their sport at the Olympics. But in Sochi, our athletes, their coaches, sports organization representatives, spectators and dignitaries may find themselves competing in a different sort of games… that have already begun (without an opening ceremony).

(2013,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY PIERRE PORIER

First Responders strive to keep the public safe during emergencies. Such careers often put their own safety at risk, and yet we regularly hear ­stories of courage in the face of those ­perils.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

With the minds of the media focussed for the time being on options of the major powers to respond to the use of chemical warfare agents by authorities of the Assad regime in Syria against civilians, where several Middle East terror organizations on both sides are battling for power at the expense of 2 million civilian dead and refugees, it is indeed timely that we offer you some knowledgeable reflections in this issue on anti-terrorism.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY ANGELA GENDRON [field_writer2]

The United Kingdom’s response to terrorism has been shaped by the various terrorist threats it has faced during the 20th century; from Russian anarchists, Irish republicans, Middle Eastern groups, to the supporters of causes such as animal rights. While the threat from Irish terrorism has diminished, an ongoing and serious terrorist threat to Northern Ireland remains. Currently, the UK assesses its most significant risk to national security as that from terrorism associated with and influenced by al-Qaeda.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MATHIEU DEFLEM

AMERICAN PERCEPTIONS OF TERRORISM

Senator Hugh Segal
(2013,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Clive Addy: First, might I thank you, Senator, for accepting to do this interview. A few years ago, terrorism was seen as something that happened elsewhere and was performed on and by people other than Canadians. How times have changed! Today and most recently, Canadians have witnessed fellow citizens being involved in terrorist activity, funding and support around the world.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY GABRIEL WEIMANN

Wolves never hunt alone

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LEAH WEST SHERRIFF

Though it may be cliché to comment on the way wireless technology has changed the modern world, today, mobile devices allow us to express ourselves through social media in real time, help us navigate our daily lives, enable us to bank, trade, buy and sell on the move, and allow us to carry the internet’s unlimited information resources in our back pocket.

(2013,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY SIMON SMITH

By getting serious about the problem of contraband tobacco, there are numerous benefits for Governments including to the population's health and national coffers. It's time that collectively we stop taking dated approaches of continually increasing taxes that only prompt further black market activity and approach the subject anew.

(2013,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

When al-Qaeda, or what it’s become, is publishing propaganda and chillingly accurate instructions to incite radicalized or radically-prone young Muslims living in the West to “build bombs in your mother’s kitchen”, it’s time to confront the reality that a new front on the Islamist war has opened up and it’s in our own backyard.

(2012,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Where does Canada stand on the topic of CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive) threats – this less likely, most dangerous, and much discussed realm of security and safety threats to humanity? There are a myriad of international treaties and conventions on these matters.

(2012,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY RAY BOISVERT

He was an award-winning horticulturalist successfully growing the rarest of orchids. He was an expert fly fisher and a documenter of river systems. He was a poet and ­publisher, as well as a long time correspondent of T.S. Eliot. He was schooled in the art of New Criticism while attending Yale, and later studied law at Harvard. But more than anything, he was the unrelenting hunter of “moles” within the CIA and, by extension, many governments and agencies of the Western world during the height of the Cold War.

(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY ARNAV MANCHANDA

View pdf

Cyberspace - The Fifth Strategic Domain

(2012,
issue 2)
BY KEN POLE [field_writer2]

View pdf

Though well-recognized as vital in the public safety and security sector, interoperable communications remain a constant challenge. This was made clear at a recent closed door event coordinated by General Dynamics Canada (GDC), where industry, government and customers addressed today’s ­capability gaps.

(2012,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MICHAEL C. IRCHA
(2012,
issue 1)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

View PDF

In April 2009, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) reported that computer hackers thought to be Chinese or Russian had breached a key computer network of U.K. defence giant BAE Systems in 2007 and 2008 and stolen several terabytes of data related to the United States' F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). BAE has been a major industrial partner on the $382-billion aerospace program during the past eight years. Not surprisingly, U.S. officials downplayed the story.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY JACQUELINE CHARTIER [field_writer2]

Leading a Modern Day Cavalry During Large-Scale Disasters

Fortunately, help was on the way. Well over 300 firefighters from more than 30 towns, cities and counties arrived to help battle nature’s inferno. Municipal officials were amazed and relieved. Mayor Karina Pillay-Kinnee remarked, “It was like the ­cavalry arrived.” More than 100 Alberta RCMP officers were also dispatched as part of the emergency response effort.

(2011,
issue 4)
BY RICHARD BRAY [field_writer2]

When Common Sense and Courage Are No Longer Enough

(2011,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY LCol PAUL M. THOBO-CARLSEN

As the Canadian government’s largest employer – with a man- date for the Defence of Canada and possessing a wide array of high-technology equipment, weapons and sensitive information holdings – the Department of National Defence (DND) and the Canadian Forces (CF) are prime targets for espionage and other ­hostile activities from individuals, groups and organizations.

(2011,
issue 3)
BY STEPHEN MOORE [field_writer2]

Intelligence in some form is in use today across a broad spectrum. No longer just the purview of Government entities, business intelligence is a common term and practice among corporations. Today, in the internet age, there is an abundance of readily accessible information about any given topic, organization or person.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY W.H. (BUD) GARRICK [field_writer2]

Since 9/11, marine port security has been the subject of increased scrutiny as it is clear that contraband flows – undetected and uninterrupted – through access and egress points of both Canada and the United States. Numerous reviews initiated by the United States Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Canadian Standing Senate Committee on National Security and Defence have clearly articulated that ports are a haven for criminal activity and organized crime, as well as targets for potential terrorist activity.

(2011,
issue 2)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2] and DAVID MUGRIDGE

With globalization, many national economies, including Canada’s, are dependent on global trade – and maritime transportation is the strongest link in the international supply chain. International shipping has become a fundamental contributor and facilitator of economic growth; but it is increasingly susceptible to events that could result in the full or partial closure of ports or associated critical infrastructure.

(2011,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY DAVID MUGRIDGE

Bringing Together Law and Technology

(2011,
issue 2)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

After more than 12 years in operation, Airport Watch has become a North American-wide concept. Its early beginnings date back to 1999 when a partnership was formed at the Ottawa Macdonald-Cartier International Airport between members of the Ottawa Police Service, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the airport authority, and a newly formed group of aircraft enthusiasts turned citizen volunteers.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

“There is a new world emerging above the Arctic Circle. It is this world, a new world for all the peoples of the Arctic regions that we in Canada are working to build”
– Stephen Harper, August 2008, Inuvik, NWT

(2011,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MICHAEL R. BOUCHARD

In October 2002, one year after the Washington D.C. terrorist attack on the Pentagon, residents of the area once again found themselves under assault. This time, the attack lasted 23 days when two individuals randomly shot and killed 10 innocent people and wounded three more. This was the first major multi-jurisdictional crisis that many public officials faced. Officials later found the pair had shot several other people across the U.S.

(2011,
issue 1)
BY ROBERT DAY [field_writer2]

A Strategic Overview

Seldom do Canadians, as a nation, look much beyond next week, next month or next year. We tend to be laid-back and blasé about our future. We engage in a game of self-deception by assuming that the threat of any major harm is restricted solely to a major environmental event, such as blizzards, hurricanes or flooding, created by climate change.

(2011,
[field_writer2] Published by by the Henry Jackson Society and tThe Centre for Social Cohesion

(July 2011) Islamic extremism is not the only terrorist threat to the United Kingdom, but it remains far and away the greatest, and the least predictable. This report provides insight into the background and history of Islamism-related terrorism in the UK over the past 20 years. Its research means that even more can be understood about the dangers Islamic terrorism and extremism have brought and still threaten British citizens and UK government assets, at home and abroad.

(2010,
issue 3)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

Today’s changing and complex environment of national security and ­public safety has underlined the role that innovation plays in battling terrorism and mitigating the effects of large scale national disasters. The need for cooperation and the coordination of resources is required if the world is to be effective in battling sustained terrorist threats or to ­mitigate major disasters.

Vic Toews
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

This year has been very productive at the Department of Public Safety, from both the legislative and policy implementation points of view. As well, there has been a greater degree of coordination and integration with our U.S. neighbour in many security domains.


Minister Vic Toews delivers a speech at the CentrePort Construction milestones event in Winnipeg, June 18, 2010.

Hugh Segal
(2010,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Canadians, generally, are concerned about the threat of ­terrorist activities. With the potential return of Omar Kadhr, the recent sentencing of a Toronto 18 member, and other events around the world, most realize that we are not immune to “home grown” terrorism.

(2010,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY AARON WYNN and KIERAN MOORE

The global population is approaching 7 billion people and, combined with the ease and frequency of modern air travel, this gives rise to a rapidly increased public health risk at major world events. Mass gatherings, as they have come to be called, are largely pre-planned events, held for a limited time and attended by more than 25,000 people. These events can include any number of purposes – political, religious, athletic – and can be attended by, for instance, 300,000 rabid soccer fans at a FIFA World Cup, or 2.5 million pilgrims at the Hajj in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As promised, this Summer 2010 edition deals with criminal financing and its effects on our security. To open, we called upon the expert perspectives of two former RCMP authorities well-versed in the subject of what we call ‘Dirty Money,’ for our first look on this specific topic.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY EDWARD R. MYERS [field_writer2]

(2010,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In a recent book entitled Tainted Money, author Avi Jorisch states: ‘As Washington reaches out to financial and foreign ministries around the globe, policymakers and laymen alike should be keenly aware of the financial dangers we will need to counter – whether they stem from rouge regimes like Iran and North Korea, the Osama bin Laden’s of the world, or criminals that are engaged in illicit activity.

(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY STEVEN HUTCHINSON

A Look at the Legal Landscape

“Financial and material gains from criminal activity should not be enjoyed by criminals. ­Not even after they have served prison terms.”

(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY STEPHEN I LANDMAN

‘Within three to five years, Al-Qaeda will be utilizing the Internet and mobile phones to centralize their fundraising.’ This sobering assessment from Richard Barrett of the United Nations is a stark reminder of the threat posed by terrorist use of developing technologies – the virtualization of terrorism.

(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY MARIO D'ANGELO

Post September 11, 2001, an increased sense of urgency has been paid to the threat of terrorism; more specifically, to the possibility that terrorists might resort to the use of a chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear resources in a deliberate act of aggression. This notion was certainly reinforced when, in 2001, a domestic terrorist(s) mailed letters containing anthrax through the United States Postal System.

(2010,
issue 2)
BY YIAGADEESEN SAMY [field_writer2]

Terrorism financing is a global problem requiring effective and coordinated solutions at the national, regional and multilateral levels. Fighting it, however, is costly; and measuring success is challenging.

Intergraph Corporation
(2010,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY SHANE LOATES


ETS dispatcher uses Integrah CAD to respond to security incidents.

One Last Thing
(2010,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

This issue of FrontLine Security provides a fascinating look into the full spectrum of financial issues in the security and crime investigation worlds. These subjects are frequently overlooked especially by our increasingly sound byte-driven media and political decision makers.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY INDUSTRY SHOWCASE

Safeguard personnel from all types of hazards

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] A PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE U.S.

The Homeland Security Institute (HSI) was conceived in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on 9/11. In its report Making the Nation Safer, the National Academies proposed the creation of a dedicated, not-for-profit technical ­analysis and support institute for homeland security to provide the U.S. Federal Government with much needed analytic capabilities in support of effective counterterrorism-related decision making and program execution.

(2010,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY FRONTLINE STAFF

Sneak Preview

(2010,
[field_writer2] By FinTrac

(Dec 2010) This report Summarizes relevant group-based, activity-based and country-based money laundering and terrorist activity financing issues. It alerts readers to new developments that could possibly be exploited for money laundering or terrorist activity financing purposes in Canada.

(2010,
[field_writer2]

This Special Report, authored by Athol Yates and Anthony Bergin argues that it's time for Defence to more fully incorporate domestic disaster assistance tasks as part of its core business. Defence is likely to be used more frequently in the future to assist in domestic disaster management. There will be larger and more frequent extreme weather events with a growing community and political expectation to use military resources to support whole-of-government counter-disaster efforts.
Three key actions should be taken:

(2009,
issue 4)
BY BLAIR WATSON [field_writer2]

For six generations, approximately 95 percent of the Canada-US border was undefended; official crossing points were the chief exception. The boundary between our nation and the United States spans 6,416 kilometres – 2,878 km on land and 3,538 km on water – and includes terrain that is flat, hilly, and mountainous, vast tracks of prairie and forests, and lakes, rivers, creeks, and marshes. For decades, governments on both sides have tried to curtail smuggling and human trafficking.

(2009,
issue 4)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2] and DOUG HALES

In a way, the “Brampton 18” is also an indicator of the change we have seen since 9/11. In one corner, we have seen civil liberties be reaffirmed with the demise of the vague and damaging security certificate; in the other corner we see the Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Anti-Terrorism Act in triumph with the pleas of guilty to terrorism charges that three of the 18 have made.

One Last Thing
(2009,
issue 3)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Canadians can be forgiven for wondering which way is up when trying to decipher the flood of news recently surrounding the status of Canada’s actions in security related cases. One day we’re subjected to shrieking headlines announcing the judge ordered “end” of security certificates – complete with a grinning Adil Charkaoui cutting off his electronic monitoring ankle bracelet – and the next it’s confirmed one of the ringleaders from the 2006 Toronto terrorism plots has just plead guilty.

(2009,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

First, Canada’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. David Butler-Jones, provides a ­snapshot of his current challenges, reflects on pandemic preparedness, and gives sound advice on our individual responsibilities with H1N1 on the immediate horizon.

Jennifer Giroux from the Centre for Security Studies in Zurich, highlights the importance of community involvement in preparation for a pending natural disaster. She notes that, with proper training,  we can all have a local role to play.

(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY LAUREN WALTON

An Awakening

(2009,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY JEZ LITTLEWOOD

Canada is a safe, stable, secure democracy. That is not to say that Canada faces no challenges to its security, but as the 2007-2008 annual report of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) states, the number of actual terrorist incidents in Canada has been minimal over the last few years. Nothing similar to September 11, 2001 has occurred since that date, and it has been over two decades since the tragic Air India bombing that originated in Canada.

(2009,
issue 1)
BY JACQUES BRUNELLE [field_writer2]

Aircraft enthusiasts watch from behind the runway fenceline as Emirates airline flight EK207 touches down on runway 24L at Toronto-Pearson airport, ending its 15-hour nonstop run from Dubai. For these enthusiasts, however, watching aircraft is more than just a hobby. These uniformed volunteers are also contributing to the safety and security of a major Canadian airport.

(2009,
issue 1)
BY ANGELA GENDRON [field_writer2]

Muslims should be prepared to kill "every single person on earth, in order to eradicate shirk." (idolatory)

(2009,
issue 1)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]

A Strategic Imperative

One Last Thing
(2009,
issue 1)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

I think it was during Day Three of SARS Outbreak Two that the wisdom of what Dr Jim Young had been saying really struck me. “The best strategy to manage an emergency or mitigate a disaster is to prevent it from happening in the first place, beginning with understanding what causes it.” I couldn’t help but reflect on that as I read the intriguing article in this issue of FrontLine entitled. “When Faith Becomes a Political Force.”

(2009,
[field_writer2] Research Institute for European and American Studies

(May 2009) Recent conflicts have featured innovative approaches to communications intelligence, which include utilizing civilian telephone networks to achieve tactical and psychological objectives. The 'cell war' between the IDF and Hamas is indicative of an ongoing global struggle between asymmetrical insurgents and state actors to control large-scale telecommunications structures.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(Feb 2009) This paper addresses sources of societal tensions and violent conflict involving minority groups of Muslim culture in contemporary Europe. Six country studies are presented: Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Russia and the United Kingdom.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(April 2009) This paper by Luis de la Corte and Andrea Giménez-Salinas offers a short review of the recent scientific literature regarding three main issues related to suicide violence.

(2009,
[field_writer2]

(June 2009) In the preparation of the new Australian white paper on counter-terrorism, this policy analysis, authored by Anthony Bergin, recommends a wide array of policy measures.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Putting this Border Security edition together, in the wake of the world-wide recession, increased tension in the Middle East, and much turbulence in both Canada and the U.S. over government regimes, was indeed a wonderfully stimulating challenge. Yet, it turns out, the real challenge remains to secure our borders without isolating ourselves (which would reduce our chances of mutual prosperity)… the same issue we have tackled for over 50 years.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS A. TASS [field_writer2]

From 1990, travel restrictions out of the post communist states almost evaporated. Simultaneously entry restrictions were significantly eased in the U.S., Canada and most western European countries.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our common border with the United States stretches across 8,893 kilometers (5,526 miles) of land and three oceans. According to Gov­ernment of Canada statistics, the annual two-way trade in goods and services between Canada and the U.S. in 2007 was worth over C$576 billion. Clearly, border security is a vital component of our ­economic security.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY ANGUS SMITH [field_writer2]

Should we have been surprised by the terrorist siege of Mumbai? Probably not.
In a January 2005 article in The Atlantic, former White House security official Richard A. Clarke posited an “alternate future” for the post-9/11 decade. Clarke chronicled a series of terrorist attacks on the US homeland. The first wave consisted of simultaneous assaults on hotels and amusement parks; the second of a series of carefully planned shooting and bombing rampages in America’s largest shopping malls. In both ­scenarios, thousands died.

(2008,
issue 4)
BY TIM LYNCH [field_writer2]

On November 27, 2008, while vacationing in Goa, India, I checked my email to discover a message from a friend in Toronto; he was inquiring if I was affected by events in Mumbai, 600 km up the road. Instinctively, I switched on CNN and immediately became aware that the city was under siege. Terrorists were killing innocent bystanders, destroying some of Mumbai’s landmarks, attacking Jewish ­residents and seeking out holders of British and American passports.

(2008,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY ADRIAN KING

Piracy on the high seas has been making the news headlines; most notably with the audacious hijacking in November of the Saudi-owned super tanker Sirius Star. At present the vessel, together with its multinational crew, languishes off the Somali coastal town of Hardeheere while negotiators attempt to reach an agreement with the present illegal custodians over a ransom payment for its release. The Sirius Star is just one of many vessels hijacked in recent times by pirates operating from Somali coastal towns and ports.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

As our renewed government faces new and major economic readjustments on a global scale, I am pleased to present this issue on Cyber Security.  


Constable Les Gramantik, of the Firearms Training Unit, demonstrates the new rifle power. (Photo courtesy of the Calgary Police Service)

(2008,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

While preparing for this edition, I wanted to improve my own knowledge of cyber security. In my search, I discovered some rather interesting facts and some downright scary issues. As is usual in many matters related to security, I found the usual industry trick, which is to scare the customer, define the problem and sell your product to avoid it, and, eventually, improve upon this protection with even more costly technical fixes.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY THOMAS QUIGGIN [field_writer2]

The intelligence needed to support our national security interests, is becoming increasingly difficult to acquire. Today, national security ­intelligence has to be developed in a complex and uncertain world where the rate of change in the external ­environ­ment makes past experience of increasingly questionable value.

(2008,
issue 3)
BY GEORGE KOLISNEK [field_writer2]

The assumption stated above is misleading though many, including some ­intelligence producers and consumers, believe that is indeed the only true role of intelligence organizations.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our Spring issue on Terrorism and Critical Infrastructure Protection ­generated much interest and comment. As we embark on the key trial of Momin Khawaja, the first Canadian-born to be charged under the new ­terrorist legislation, the issues brought up in our last edition by Howie Marsh and Tom Quiggin will surely resonate in the minds of our readers.

(2008,
issue 2)
BY PETER HOLT [field_writer2]

Introduction

One Last Thing
(2008,
issue 2)
BY SCOTT NEWARK [field_writer2]

Country and Western singer Toby Keith immortalized this phrase in his gravelly ballad about relationship expectations. His sentiment was right at home last month at the Conference Board of Canada’s Critical Infrastructure (CI) Security Conference. As several presenters and delegates noted, despite the passage of six and a half years since 9/11, Canada still lacks a comprehensive, clear strategy aimed at securing Critical Infrastructure and ensuring, to the extent possible, its business resiliency.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our main theme for this edition is on Critical Infrastructure Protection. The protection of these essential assets (80% of which are privately owned) is a major government responsibility that requires proper legislation and ­coordination. It is saddening how little progress and attention seems to have been brought to this real safety concern for all Canadians. The pleas go ­unanswered, but we continue – it is that important!

(2008,
issue 1)
[field_writer2]

History reminds us that the advent of freedom is regularly confronted by campaigns of terror. Today’s elevated levels of terrorism, in my view, are largely the result of the increasing availability of information to nations where information has long been censored or unavailable. This block of nations is a ­disparate agglomeration of states with serious internal struggles. Let’s examine some current terrorist trends and relate them to our own counter-­terrorism strategy in the War on Terror.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY THOMAS QUIGGIN [field_writer2]

The Network Centric War and Terrorism

AComm Bud Mercer
(2008,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY J.K.M. BAMBI

Canadians are looking forward to celebrating and participating in the Vancouver 2010 Olympics and Paralympics Winter Games.

Ward Elcock
(2008,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Mr. Elcock is a respected veteran of security matters in the higher levels of the federal Public Service, having headed CSIS and been more recently the Deputy Minister of National Defence. FrontLine Security’s Executive Editor, Clive Addy, welcomes his perspective as a follow-up to our recent edition on the security of the 2010 Olympics.

(2008,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

Al Qaeda Has a New Weapon of Choice

(2008,
[field_writer2]

(Dec 2008) When it comes to a future cyberwar, the issue is no longer if it'll happen. Instead, the concern is when it'll happen, how bad it'll be, and how many attacks we'll have to withstand.

(2008,
[field_writer2]

(April 2008) In an annual report on terrorism, the State Department says "Al-Qaeda remained the greatest terrorist threat to the United States and its partners" even though its structures have weakened and public support has waned. And it warns that Al-Qaeda "has reconstituted some of its pre-9/11 operational capabilities" by using the Pakistan border areas, replacing key leaders, and restoring some "central control" by its top leadership.

(2007,
issue 4)
BY THOMAS QUIGGIN [field_writer2]

One comment currently being heard in British Columbia is that the upcoming 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics will be “a sporting event, not a security event.”

(2007,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY ALICE D'ANJOU

Over the past several years, a series of previously unthinkable events have caused the RCMP to consider its state of operational readiness. Sept 11th, Hurricane Katrina, and massive bombings in Madrid and London required extra­ordinary efforts from a wide range of responding agencies. Here at home, reports of flooding, forest fires, severe weather, blackouts, terrorist threats, and warnings of an inevitable flu pandemic arrive from all quarters on a regular basis.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In this our Fall issue, we have chosen to focus on Canada’s Maritime Security – ­primarily because of concerns following recent Senate Committee reports, and the obvious impact that a continued lack of reasonable maritime security would have on our safety and prosperity.

(2007,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY TONY BAUMGARTNER

As the nation reassesses its response to large scale disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and its preparedness for the threat of H5N1 flu pandemic, planners must also begin thinking about and preparing for the inevitable – mass fatality management. A mass fatality incident is defined as “any incident where the number of fatalities is greater than normal local arrangements can manage.” Any plan for dealing with fatalities needs to be integrated with all aspects of the response to and recovery from such incidents.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY SUNIL RAM [field_writer2]

In the wake of independence in 1962, Algeria came under the growing authoritarian governance of the socialist National Liberation Front (FLN). Tensions exploded in 1988 when a series of youth riots, which left over 500 dead, set off a new Islamic revolt in Algeria. The government subsequently acquiesced to the first multiparty election, however, when the Islamic Salvation Front (Front Islamique du Salut – FIS) won a round of parliamentary elections for local councils in 1990, the FLN changed the electoral laws so it could win in the future.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY THOMAS QUIGGIN [field_writer2]

Despite the last six years of pressure, Al Qaeda and its inspired followers are still capable of taking the initiative in operations. Recent events in Pakistan, especially in the North West Frontier Province, demonstrate that Al Qaeda is rebuilding its core capabilities. Its highly successful propaganda and recruiting media machine, “As-Sahab,” also continues to function with a high degree of effectiveness.

(2007,
issue 3)
BY DOUG HARRISON [field_writer2]

Although it is difficult to actually pinpoint when emergency management emerged as a recognizable and distinct profession, it can safely be said that the idea or concept of practitioners schooled in risk management started to evolve in the 1990’s. By the early 2000’s, emergency management was both the buzzword and the business!

(2007,
issue 2)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Idassa 2007 Croatia

IDASSA 2007 is the second Natural Disaster exercise that the Republic of Croatia, in cooperation with NATO’s Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coord­ina­tion Centre (EADRCC), has organized on its territory. The majority of Croatian work for the exercise was organized and conducted by the National Protection and Reserve Directorate.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY RICHARD COHEN [field_writer2]

‘Big Ideas’ have long been a feature of Canada-U.S. relations. One recent very Big Idea is the Security and Prosperity Partnership (SPP), launched in 2004 by the Prime Minister of Canada, President Bush, and the Mexican president. Several other Big Ideas co-exist with the SPP and some of them nestle under its wing. But there are many less-grand ideas, most initiated well below national level both by government and the private sector. Several of these smaller ideas may well have just as big an impact in the longer term on our lives and prosperity.

(2007,
issue 2)
BY DOUG SILVER [field_writer2] and CAROL-LYNN CHAMBERS

Heavy Urban Search and Rescue (HUSAR) teams are multi-disciplinary in nature. Personnel and equipment used by these teams can be deployed locally, provincially, and across Canada to provide the specialized search and rescue to free and recover trapped victims.


Toronto HUSAR team members work to remove heavy debris and secure safe positions within a collapsed structure.

(2007,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY ROBERT BERGEN

The next time a Canadian soldier is killed, in Afghanistan or anywhere else, think about his or her death, and ask the following two questions:

  • When a police officer is killed in the line of duty, do Canadians want the police to stop protecting their ­communities?
  • When a firefighter dies on the job, do Canadians ask them to stop fighting fires?

Canadian troops don’t understand those who get squeamish or question Canada’s contribution to rebuilding Afghanistan when soldiers are killed or wounded by the Taliban.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

Our winter Borders and Biometrics edition was very timely.

(2007,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

The protection of critical infrastructure is a key national security issue in a way that it has not been since the ‘snakes and ladders’ days of the late 1950s and the early Cold War civil defence program. Today’s threat has changed from Soviet rockets to various state and non-state actors armed with an equally wide variety of weapons. With this revolution in military affairs, has come a renewed interest in asymmetric confrontation of the Superpower and its NATO and Western Allies.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY PHILIP DAWE and KEN MARSHALL

Many threats and hazards have the potential to undermine the security and safety of Canadians. These threats and hazards can be man-made, such as acts of terrorism, or they can be natural, such as floods, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. The ability of the public safety and security community to manage these emergencies and disasters can be aided by information technology. In particular, ‘geospatial’ information technology (technology that ties information to a location – a mapping system) is proving increasingly useful to emergency managers.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MARK GILES

Set between the Rhone River and the “Parc Tete d’Or” in Lyon, France – about an hour’s drive southwest of the Swiss border – is a rather unique looking building. As some of its security features become visible to the casual passer-by, including marked police vehicles and uniformed officers at the entrance, some might wonder what purpose it serves.


The General Secretariat in Lyon, France, serves as Interpol headquarters.

(2007,
issue 1)
[field_writer2] BY MICHAEL ABRAMSON

It’s been a little over a decade since I began my quest for the holy grail of computing: the delivery of sustainable information INTEROPERABILITY. Known by many names over the years, the terminology that is growing on me is “semantic interoperability.” The objective, most can agree, is the “guaranteed access to quality information requisite to making sound business or operational decisions.” So why, after more than a decade, does this goal still appear as elusive as ever?

(2006,
issue 4)
[field_writer2] BY MAJ HAROLD BOTTOMS

Few would argue that 9/11 changed the world in fundamental ways. The impact in Canada was almost as profound as in the U.S. and the response by governments here and south of here was laudable – lots of scurrying round with new anti-terrorism committees, intergovernmental talks, and cross ­border treaties.

(2006,
issue 4)
BY CATHERINE JOHNSTON [field_writer2]

In a world plagued by terrorism, identity fraud, hackers and other security risks, there is a question of whether we need to give up our privacy to gain security. Canadians should refuse to enter this debate, because this is the wrong question if we seek to find a balance between our right to privacy, need for personal ­security and desire to conduct business electronically.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY CLIVE ADDY [field_writer2]

In this fickle Canada of six-month business plans and two-year governments influenced by the latest polls or stock-market prices, and where “second quarter results” are used as an indication of long term profitability, and “reality” TV is ­distracting us from the dangerously true reality, are we ready for a necessary, ­difficult and prolonged commitment to... anything? Is there the pragmatic ­realization that we are now at war… really?

(2006,
issue 3)
BY PETER AVIS [field_writer2]

It’s up to us to disrupt it

(2006,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY TIM CONNORS

Chief among their conclusions ought to be that this threat has global reach and is alive and well – and that there is no silver bullet counter measure that will prevent the next attack. Both assessments have profound meaning for how our state and local public safety agencies are organizing and preparing their people for this new age of security.

(2006,
issue 3)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

Canada and her European allies had best beware of the Lebanon-based ­terrorist group Hezbollah as UN negotiations to halt Iran’s military nuclear program continue in stalemate, and tensions rise with Israel and the U.S.

On July 11, the eve of the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers that sparked the recent conflict, Ali Larijani, the head of Iran’s National Security Council, threatened European Union negotiators that Iran would harm Western interests if its nuclear program was referred back to the UN Security Council.

(2006,
issue 3)
[field_writer2] BY SHELDON DICKIE, CAM BOULE and SUSAN McINTYRE

In the fall of 2001, Canada’s federal government took steps to enhance preparedness through new programs and funding aimed specifically at countering terrorism.  In its budget of December 12, 2001, the government committed $7.7 billion to bolster defences against terrorism which could have devastating affects on national security, the economy and collective psyche.  Of this funding, $170 million was given to the federal S&T community to address Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) hazards or weapons of mass destruction (WMD).

(2006,
issue 3)
BY PETER HILLIER [field_writer2]

Outsourcers have a responsibility to protect client data regardless of where it flows or is stored – as is certainly highlighted by a barrage of client data security breaches of late.

(2006,
issue 2)
[field_writer2] BY KEN DUNLAP

Protecting our passengers and employees with effective and efficient security measures is the highest priority for the aviation industry. However, since the tragic events of September 11, 2001, the airline industry has endured a continuous stream of stopgap security measures – many of these were rushed into effect with little or no industry input. What we are finding, is that a security system designed through hastened reaction to a crisis may not be the best long-term solution for the industry.

(2006,
issue 2)
BY JAMES COX [field_writer2]

Some analysts have noted inadequacies in certain Canadian national security strategies. The fault may lie elsewhere. Any strategy, no matter how robust and well thought out, will not be fully effective in a policy vacuum, because strategy is derived from policy, or at least it should be. Without a sound policy to provide guidance and context, strategy is like the Maple Leafs at the end of the regular hockey season – lots of activity, but going nowhere.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY JOE VARNER [field_writer2]

In the aftermath of this past summer’s July 7th Al Qaeda terrorist attacks in London, Canada must move rapidly to adopt an integrated counter-terrorism strategy before it is too late.

(2006,
issue 1)
BY RODGER B. SLOAN [field_writer2]

While the risk of a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) attack is small, the consequences of such an attack are enormous: the public’s perception of personal security, and the enormous costs associated with detection, identification, treatment of affected persons and cleanup ensures that this risk must be mitigated by preparation. Timely and reliable identification of suspect areas and materials is also essential to minimize risks of exposure, costs of cleanup and threat to public security.

(2005,
[field_writer2] By the Library of Congress

(2005) Marine shipments of hazardous chemical cargo may be attractive terrorist targets because of their large volume and inherent toxicity or flammability. The Maritime Transportation Security Act and the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code give the U.S. Coast Guard far-ranging authority over the security of hazardous marine shipping. The agency has developed port security plans addressing how to deploy federal, state, and local resources to prevent terrorist attacks.